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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Is this book any good?

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  • Dave Ordway
    I have seen reference to the Glastonbury style chair being from the family of faldistorium or fauldstool. I feel this may be in era as the only thing in
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 25, 2008
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      I have seen reference to the Glastonbury "style" chair being from the family of faldistorium or fauldstool.  I feel this may be in era as the only thing in common is the crossed leg design.  The Glastonbury does not fold nor was it designed to.  It does however disassemble which is handy for transporting it to events.
       
      Lagerstein
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2008 10:53 AM
      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Is this book any good?

      He does call it a "folding chair." 
       
      Will


      From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of James Winkler
      Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2008 7:23 PM
      To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Is this book any good?

      ...  ummm... wonder if it's the one that sez' "Glastonbury chairs fold up?"   ;-)
       
      Chas.



      To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
      From: robin@gallowglass. org
      Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2008 14:28:07 -0400
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Is this book any good?


      > It also perpetuates the "Glastonbury Chair" myth, and the dubious 19th-c.
      > reconstruction of same... but that's another thread!

      This is the first I've heard of this myth, and it actually is the Glastonbury
      Chair that first attracted me to the book. What is this myth?

      >
      > Cheers,
      > Colin

      Robin

    • Alex Haugland
      I am unsure what you mean by the glastonbury chair being unique... When I was last in the UK, we drove around quite a bit and saw several chairs of this style
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 26, 2008
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        I am unsure what you mean by the glastonbury chair being unique...  When I was last in the UK, we drove around quite a bit and saw several chairs of this style in cathedrals and churches all around the UK...  I certainly can't speak for the provenance of those chairs and they may have been 19th or even 20th century copies of the period design...

        --Alysuandre Weldon d'Ath
        Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

        AlbionWood wrote:

        1.  The original "Glastonbury Chair" is only one example of a style more common on the Continent in the late 15th and early 16th c - it is only called the "Glastonbury" style by Anglophones - and it is, in its current configuration, significantly different from all other examples.  (Much more complicated to build.)  As far as I can tell it is in fact unique.


      • julian wilson
        Gentles of the List, This humble veteran soldier can confirm that the so-named Glastonbury Chair was much-coped for Church furniture during the English
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 26, 2008
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          Gentles of the List,
          This humble veteran soldier can confirm that the so-named Glastonbury Chair was much-coped for Church furniture during the English "Gothick Revival", which saw so many English Churchs  "renovated & re-modelled" by eager Victorian Architects..
          For example, in St. Helier, Jersey, our late-19th Century Catholic-"cathedral" Church of St. Thomas. has at least two examples of that chair, which are known to have been supplied from Breton Furniture Makers when the Church was built around 1875 - being mentioned in the orginal Accounts of the fitting-out.

          Servus,
          Matthew Baker.

          --- On Fri, 26/9/08, Alex Haugland <ahauglan@...> wrote:
          From: Alex Haugland <ahauglan@...>
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Is this book any good?
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, 26 September, 2008, 5:13 PM

          I am unsure what you mean by the glastonbury chair being unique...  When I was last in the UK, we drove around quite a bit and saw several chairs of this style in cathedrals and churches all around the UK...  I certainly can't speak for the provenance of those chairs and they may have been 19th or even 20th century copies of the period design...

          --Alysuandre Weldon d'Ath
          Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

          AlbionWood wrote:

          1.  The original "Glastonbury Chair" is only one example of a style more common on the Continent in the late 15th and early 16th c - it is only called the "Glastonbury" style by Anglophones - and it is, in its current configuration, significantly different from all other examples.  (Much more complicated to build.)  As far as I can tell it is in fact unique.


        • AlbionWood
          There are a couple of unique aspects to the Glastonbury chair. One is the carving - including the name of the man* it was made for, and the year. It s
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 26, 2008
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            There are a couple of unique aspects to the Glastonbury chair.  One is the carving - including the name of the man* it was made for, and the year.  It's extremely rare to find a date on medieval furniture, and AFAIK this is the sole specimen on which the owner's name appears.

            The other is the way the seat and back go together.  In all other examples of this style, the seat is narrower than the back, which allows the arms to be parallel.  The Glastonbury chair, as currently configured, has the seat wider than the back, so the arms must cant at an angle to the rest of the structure.  This greatly (and unnecessarily) complicates construction.

            There are thousands of copies of this chair in England, especially in the West and South.  Beginning in the Gothic Revival era of the 19th century, these came to be identified as a "church chair" and repros were furnished to churches and cathedrals for all kinds of uses. 

            * A monk of Glastonbury, John Arthur Thorne.  He was later hanged, along with the Abbot.

            Cheers,
            Colin


            Alex Haugland wrote:
            I am unsure what you mean by the glastonbury chair being unique...  When I was last in the UK, we drove around quite a bit and saw several chairs of this style in cathedrals and churches all around the UK...  I certainly can't speak for the provenance of those chairs and they may have been 19th or even 20th century copies of the period design...
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