Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: A Wood finish

Expand Messages
  • Trevor Payne
    Try using a food grade varnish.  That way when baby chews on it there is not toxic chemicals. Aiden Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Try using a food grade varnish.  That way when baby chews on it there is not toxic chemicals.

      Aiden

      "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
      --Benjamin Franklin--

      --- On Thu, 8/7/08, Rodrigo Belmonte <rodrigo_belmonte@...> wrote:
      From: Rodrigo Belmonte <rodrigo_belmonte@...>
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: A Wood finish
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, August 7, 2008, 10:05 PM

      If you are making what I think you are making, I have seen them several times in doctors offices and the like. The kids love them, and spend hours playing with them! My only cautions would be to consider the metal used very carefully, as well as the size of the wooden baubles.. perhaps you could encorporate a learning tool with it, make it fun, and educational!

       

      In service to the Dream,

       

      Rodrigo Belmonte

      Oakheart Company of Archers

      Shire of Oakheart

      Kingdom of Calontir



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: i_griffen <i_griffen@yahoo. com>
      To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Thursday, August 7, 2008 7:59:52 PM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: A Wood finish

      Since my grand daughter is only 3 weeks old I have time to look for
      the right material for the toy.

      What I want to make is formed wire device that has several shapes
      that are secured to a couple of pieces of wood with different shapes
      that rides on the wires.

      As for the wood I am thinking about wooden beads, brcaues of the
      various shapes.

      what do you all think?

      Iain Griffen

      --- In medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@.. .>
      wrote:
      >
      > what wood are you using? most toys for babys made out of wood are
      > safer if NOT finished.
      >
      > On Thu, Aug 7, 2008 at 12:37 PM, i_griffen <i_griffen@. ..> wrote:
      > > Can anyone recommend a wood finish that is baby safe? I want to
      make a
      > > toy for my grand daughter and want to make it paint/finish safe.
      > >
      > > thanks
      > >
      > > Iain Griffen
      > >
      > >
      >



    • donat0
      Thank you, Paul for your quick response. This is becoming a good conversation. To preface my response, I would like to say I prefer to use a wooden board.
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you, Paul for your quick response. This is becoming a good
        conversation. To preface my response, I would like to say I prefer
        to use a wooden board. Its easier on the cutting blades, and I clean
        up soon after cutting, especially meats.

        Your first source, was very interesting...

        http://www.naturalhandyman.com/iip/infxtra/infcuttingboard.html

        But I would like to point out...

        "Although the bacteria that have disappeared from the wood surfaces
        are found alive inside the wood for some time after application, they
        evidently do not multiply, and they gradually die. They can be
        detected only by splitting or gouging the wood or by forcing water
        completely through from one surface to the other. If a sharp knife is
        used to cut into the work surfaces after used plastic or wood has
        been contaminated with bacteria and cleaned manually, more bacteria
        are recovered from a used plastic surface than from a used wood
        surface." (Quote from article)

        Really, the article stated that wood is OK, and actaully better than
        plastic if both are scarred from cutting. This doesn't mean wood is
        antibacterial, or even safe. Just better than plastic if both are
        scarred. I think what is not said in the article about lingering
        contamination beacons back to what I said before about anaerobic
        conditions. If you saturate your wood; replace air in the pores with
        water, the bacteria can stay alive a lot longer, where plastic is
        hydrophillic (repels water), and you wouldn't have that problem.

        This source also doesn't comment about wood being antibacterial..

        http://www.chefknivestogo.com/woodvsplascu.html

        But it DOES comment about sanitation practices,

        "A mild bleach solution will decontaminate plastic and other
        surfaces. But even at full strength, bleach does not sanitize wood
        cutting boards. The disinfectant quality of bleach is neutralized by
        the organic composition of wood. A good procedure for disinfecting
        both wood and plastic cutting boards, as well as other surfaces and
        utensils, is to spray them first with a mist of vinegar, then with a
        mist of hydrogen peroxide." (quote from article)

        Note, Bleach is totally ineffective against contamination on wood, I
        didn't know that and will adjust my own cleaning practices. Thanks.

        You need to read your source on this one again.

        http://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/health/foodsafety/az1076.html

        "However, more recent studies by the Food and Drug Administration
        found that microorganisms became trapped in wood surfaces and were
        difficult to dislodge by rinsing. Once trapped, bacteria survive in a
        dormant stage for long periods of time. The next time the cutting
        board is used, these bacteria could contaminate other foods,
        potentially causing food-borne illness. On the other hand, the study
        found that microorganisms were easily washed off plastic surfaces."
        (Quote from FDA article)

        The last source really didn't say anything one way or the other, so I
        won't comment on it.

        Thanks again Paul, for the response. Its always a good thing to get
        views from different perspectives to explore the "bigger picture" of
        life.

        Donato, Proprietor of Rifugio Del Bacchus.
      • leaking pen
        http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm Heres a study on salmonella that shows the bacteria was pulled into the wood,
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/docliver/Research/cuttingboard.htm

          Heres a study on salmonella that shows the bacteria was pulled into
          the wood, dehydrated and killed, did not multiply, and was not
          available to contaminate on the surface.

          On Fri, Aug 8, 2008 at 6:33 AM, donat0 <donat0@...> wrote:
          >
          >> Wood is a natural antibiotic, which is why wooden cutting boards are
          >> safer than plastic.
          >
          > I don't mean to pick nits here, but I believe this is dangerous
          > misinformation. Could you please show us a source showing this is
          > true? Children are supposed to be exposed to contaminants to build
          > strong immune systems, but to claim sanitary values for kitchen
          > equipment is not good.
          >
          > One of the most common transfer points of Salmonella is through
          > improperly cleaned wooden cutting boards- the bacteria can live for
          > weeks if the board is saturated. Admittedly, most dangerous
          > bacteria's are aneorobic (must have no oxygen to live), and wood by
          > nature creates an aerobic environment, I think to assume its safe
          > because its wood beacons us back to "Assume means....."
          >
          > "Pieces of raw and painted wood were observed in the firm's class 100
          > and class 1,000 rooms. Wood is porous, difficult to disinfect, can
          > allow for the growth of bacteria and mold and contamination of the
          > environment."
          >
          > http://tinyurl.com/5g3fvw
          >
          > I am sorry, I don't mean to contradict anybody, but we must always
          > maintain a higher sanitation priority when preparing food for other
          > people.
          >
          > Donato Del Giardinier, Proprietor Rifugio Del Bacchus.
          >
          >
        • AlbionWood
          The bottom line on cutting boards is, both wood and plastic are safe if you keep them clean and keep them dry - and neither are safe if you do not. The
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            The bottom line on cutting boards is, both wood and plastic are safe if
            you keep them clean and keep them dry - and neither are safe if you do
            not. The differences between the two materials are interesting but
            negligible in terms of personal use. (Commercial food preparation use
            patterns are very different, the materials have less chance to dry out
            as they are in use more continuously, so bacteria populations can build
            up faster.)

            Wash well, wipe with vinegar, keep dry between uses, and you'll be safe
            with either material.

            Now back to the original question - as others noted, no finish at all is
            probably best for this application, but in practice all modern finishes
            are safe when fully cured. Bob Flexner has been trying for years to
            combat the persistent belief that wood finishes are toxic. They are
            not. But if you don't believe him, use shellac - it is in fact
            food-safe, used to coat pills, among other things.

            Cheers,
            Tim
          • Rebekah d'Avignon
            donat0 wrote: I don t mean to pick nits here, but I believe this is dangerous misinformation. Could you please show us a source
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              donat0 <donat0@...> wrote:
              I don't mean to pick nits here, but I believe this is dangerous misinformation. Could you please show us a source showing this is true? Children are supposed to be exposed to contaminants to build strong immune systems, but to claim sanitary values for kitchen equipment is not good.
              Um......wrong.
              One of the most common transfer points of Salmonella is through improperly cleaned wooden cutting boards- the bacteria can live for weeks if the board is saturated.
              Sorry.....read the item below.

              "Pieces of raw and painted wood were observed in the firm's class 100 and class 1,000 rooms. Wood is porous, difficult to disinfect, can allow for the growth of bacteria and mold and contamination of the environment. "

              Donato Del Giardinier, Proprietor Rifugio Del Bacchus.
              .

               
               


              RdA
              Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

            • bayard_turner
              Bob Flexner, author of Understanding Wood Finishing , wrote an article for the Spring 2008 American Woodturner. He says that all the Salad Bowl Finishes ,
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 8, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Bob Flexner, author of "Understanding Wood Finishing", wrote an
                article for the Spring 2008 American Woodturner. He says that all the
                "Salad Bowl Finishes", etc., are simply alkyd varnishes thinned with
                mineral spirits - "wiping varnishes." They contain the same driers as
                any other varnish and are no more or less safe. All the driers used
                in varnish and drying oils like BLO are approved by the FDA (Bob says
                to google "21CFR175.300" and click on the top link). His contention
                is that all finishes - varnish, drying oils, lacquer, etc. are
                "food-safe" after they have fully cured.

                Given that information, what finish would handle rough use over time
                best? A surface finish, like poly, lays on top of the wood, and
                provides good protection from water, drool, etc. An oil like BLO
                soaks in, but offers little protection at the surface. I'd go with
                what works best for you on other projects.

                Bayard

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "lambdakennels1@..."
                <lambdakennels1@...> wrote:
                >
                > You can get a can of "toy maker finish" from a wood store such as
                Rockler or Woordcraft. I have a can. It says it is child safe after
                three or four coats when cured 48 hours after the last coat. I have
                not used it -- stopped making things that needed that sort of thing,
                so can't tell you how it does.
                >
                >
                > Stephanie Smith, Ph.D
                > http://lambdafarm.mysite.com/
                > Owned by a Poodle and an Australian Cattle Dog
                > K5AMK
                >
                >
                > -- "i_griffen" <i_griffen@...> wrote:
                > Can anyone recommend a wood finish that is baby safe? I want to make a
                > toy for my grand daughter and want to make it paint/finish safe.
                >
                >
                > thanks
                >
                > Iain Griffen
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                >
                >
                > Get everything you need to hook up your own wireless network by
                clicking now!
                >
                http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/Ioyw6i3npyAf2LkMptkNUQyjKqiGPGPcfRcQPtSb9wTYXfQMkDehHH/
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.