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My crazy wood weekend (very long)

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  • Robin Gallowglass
    As some of you may know, I ve been making slat beds based on the Gokstad find (but not exact replica s) for a number of years. I ve had a number of people
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 7 12:49 PM
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      As some of you may know, I've been making slat beds based on the Gokstad find
      (but not exact replica's) for a number of years. I've had a number of people
      commission me to make beds for them as well. No, this is not a commercial
      message :)

      In late June, I only had to make 2 beds before Pennsic -- one for us (for some
      reason, the bed that we use at Pennsic never comes home with us. Somebody
      sees it and wants it!) and a commission. In the space of a week, I had
      inquires from 3 other people who wanted to commission a bed before Pennsic!

      So I did some time estimates, one of the inquires didn't pan out and I took
      the other 2. So now I had to make 4 beds before Pennsic. Yes, I'm crazy,
      but I had the long July 4th weekend. So here is my tell, because I think you
      all will enjoy it!

      So Thursday, July 3rd, I got into work god awful early so I could leave early
      and go buy the Poplar for the 4 beds. Earlier in the day, I had called the
      lumber yard, and according to their computer, they were out of stock on the
      sizes I wanted (1" x 6" and 1" x 8"). They had plenty of 1" x 10" and 1" x
      12", so my plan was to rip 1" x 12" down to 2 1" x 6" and the 1" x 10" to 1"
      x 8".

      I got to the lumber yard and was pleasantly surprised to find lots and lots of
      1" x 6" and 1" x 8" in longer lengths, but that's ok, it's easy to turn a 12'
      1" x 6" into 2 6' 1" x 6"!

      So when it was all said and done, I had $850 worth of Poplar in the back of
      the van, and boy did it smell great!

      I only got about 4.5 hours of sleep, so I decided that playing with wood and
      sharp power tools would not be a good idea, so I worked on the plans for the
      bed and then hit the sack.

      I got up Friday morning and headed down to the shop after eating breakfast. I
      wanted to jump right in and start cutting boards, but decided that I would
      clean up the shop a bit before I started. Well, one thing led to another, and
      6 hours later, I had the shop clean, re-arranged and organized. For those of
      you who have seen the shop, there is now plenty of room to move around, the
      tables of all the tools are not being used to stack and store stuff and I
      even put hand tools up on peg board!

      After getting that done, I unloaded the wood into the shop and took a dinner
      break. After dinner, I head back down, dismounted the POS blade that came
      with my compound miter saw and put my 80 tooth narrow kerf Freud blade on it.
      It made nice clean cuts in the poplar! I squared off the ends of all the
      slats, setup a jig and then cut all slats to length (12 longer one and 24
      short ones) then called it a night. Not as much as I wanted to get done that
      day, but the time spent cleaning and re-arranging the shop paid off in the
      end.

      But at the end of the weekend, the status is:

      Amount of Poplar purchased: $850.00
      Number of boards squared off and cut to length: 56
      Number of mortises cut using jigs and my plunge router: 88
      Number of tenons cut: 96
      Number of 4' billets of 12/4 Poplar planned to thickness: 6
      Number of sore feet: 2
      Number of injuries: 0! (I'm not cutting nicks and scrapes, those are part and
      parcel of wood working)


      This is with me getting all OCD Friday morning on the shop (6 hours) and
      having to stop at 5pm on Saturday to prep for a sleep study, so all told,
      that's 9 to 10 hours I could have been making saw dust. Considering that I'm
      only, at best, 4 hours away from where I wanted to be tonight, I'm pretty
      pleased.

      Still left to do:


      1. Run one edge of each billet through the jointer
      2. Rip the billets into slightly over sized posts
      3. Run each post through the thickness planner to bring it down to it's
      finished size
      4. Cut the mortises in the posts
      5. Round over all the boards
      6. Mark and drill the holes for the pegs
      7. Make the pegs
      8. Sand
      9. Put the finish (stain/sealant) coat on.


      I should be able to get 1 - 4 done Monday after work, 5, 6 and maybe 7 done
      Tuesday night and then I can start sanding.

      Some random thoughts about the weekend:


      * I wish the sliding compound miter saw I ordered had arrived in time. It
      would have made things even easier
      * Well designed jigs rock! (Thanks Haraldr!)
      * A well tuned bandsaw rocks!
      * If you fill a 14 gallon shop vac 4 times, that's a lot of saw dust :)
      * A well laid out shop is a dream
      * I need to put my table saw on wheels so I can more easily move it out of the
      center of the shop
      * A vacuum port on a router rocks!
      * How did I ever get by without a plunge router with a vacuum port, a turret
      depth stop and a template bushing?
      * The one short coming of the plunge router I got is that it doesn't have a
      light source shining on the work area like my POS Ryobi. Must come up with a
      solution......

      I have some photo's up from Friday at http://gallowglass.org/gallery/mk4 if
      anybody is interested.

      Covered in poplar saw dust,

      Robin
    • Barbara Dodge
      I wish I could have been so productive this weekend! Barb _____ From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 7 5:42 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        I wish I could have been so productive this weekend!
         
        Barb


        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robin Gallowglass
        Sent: Monday, July 07, 2008 3:49 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] My crazy wood weekend (very long)

        As some of you may know, I've been making slat beds based on the Gokstad find
        (but not exact replica's) for a number of years. I've had a number of people
        commission me to make beds for them as well. No, this is not a commercial
        message :)

        In late June, I only had to make 2 beds before Pennsic -- one for us (for some
        reason, the bed that we use at Pennsic never comes home with us. Somebody
        sees it and wants it!) and a commission. In the space of a week, I had
        inquires from 3 other people who wanted to commission a bed before Pennsic!

        So I did some time estimates, one of the inquires didn't pan out and I took
        the other 2. So now I had to make 4 beds before Pennsic. Yes, I'm crazy,
        but I had the long July 4th weekend. So here is my tell, because I think you
        all will enjoy it!

        So Thursday, July 3rd, I got into work god awful early so I could leave early
        and go buy the Poplar for the 4 beds. Earlier in the day, I had called the
        lumber yard, and according to their computer, they were out of stock on the
        sizes I wanted (1" x 6" and 1" x 8"). They had plenty of 1" x 10" and 1" x
        12", so my plan was to rip 1" x 12" down to 2 1" x 6" and the 1" x 10" to 1"
        x 8".

        I got to the lumber yard and was pleasantly surprised to find lots and lots of
        1" x 6" and 1" x 8" in longer lengths, but that's ok, it's easy to turn a 12'
        1" x 6" into 2 6' 1" x 6"!

        So when it was all said and done, I had $850 worth of Poplar in the back of
        the van, and boy did it smell great!

        I only got about 4.5 hours of sleep, so I decided that playing with wood and
        sharp power tools would not be a good idea, so I worked on the plans for the
        bed and then hit the sack.

        I got up Friday morning and headed down to the shop after eating breakfast. I
        wanted to jump right in and start cutting boards, but decided that I would
        clean up the shop a bit before I started. Well, one thing led to another, and
        6 hours later, I had the shop clean, re-arranged and organized. For those of
        you who have seen the shop, there is now plenty of room to move around, the
        tables of all the tools are not being used to stack and store stuff and I
        even put hand tools up on peg board!

        After getting that done, I unloaded the wood into the shop and took a dinner
        break. After dinner, I head back down, dismounted the POS blade that came
        with my compound miter saw and put my 80 tooth narrow kerf Freud blade on it.
        It made nice clean cuts in the poplar! I squared off the ends of all the
        slats, setup a jig and then cut all slats to length (12 longer one and 24
        short ones) then called it a night. Not as much as I wanted to get done that
        day, but the time spent cleaning and re-arranging the shop paid off in the
        end.

        But at the end of the weekend, the status is:

        Amount of Poplar purchased: $850.00
        Number of boards squared off and cut to length: 56
        Number of mortises cut using jigs and my plunge router: 88
        Number of tenons cut: 96
        Number of 4' billets of 12/4 Poplar planned to thickness: 6
        Number of sore feet: 2
        Number of injuries: 0! (I'm not cutting nicks and scrapes, those are part and
        parcel of wood working)

        This is with me getting all OCD Friday morning on the shop (6 hours) and
        having to stop at 5pm on Saturday to prep for a sleep study, so all told,
        that's 9 to 10 hours I could have been making saw dust. Considering that I'm
        only, at best, 4 hours away from where I wanted to be tonight, I'm pretty
        pleased.

        Still left to do:

        1. Run one edge of each billet through the jointer
        2. Rip the billets into slightly over sized posts
        3. Run each post through the thickness planner to bring it down to it's
        finished size
        4. Cut the mortises in the posts
        5. Round over all the boards
        6. Mark and drill the holes for the pegs
        7. Make the pegs
        8. Sand
        9. Put the finish (stain/sealant) coat on.

        I should be able to get 1 - 4 done Monday after work, 5, 6 and maybe 7 done
        Tuesday night and then I can start sanding.

        Some random thoughts about the weekend:

        * I wish the sliding compound miter saw I ordered had arrived in time. It
        would have made things even easier
        * Well designed jigs rock! (Thanks Haraldr!)
        * A well tuned bandsaw rocks!
        * If you fill a 14 gallon shop vac 4 times, that's a lot of saw dust :)
        * A well laid out shop is a dream
        * I need to put my table saw on wheels so I can more easily move it out of the
        center of the shop
        * A vacuum port on a router rocks!
        * How did I ever get by without a plunge router with a vacuum port, a turret
        depth stop and a template bushing?
        * The one short coming of the plunge router I got is that it doesn't have a
        light source shining on the work area like my POS Ryobi. Must come up with a
        solution.... ..

        I have some photo's up from Friday at http://gallowglass. org/gallery/ mk4 if
        anybody is interested.

        Covered in poplar saw dust,

        Robin

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