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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Bourdichon Shop replica tool pix (was: Hello--New to group)

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  • conradh@efn.org
    ... Thanks for the kind words. Of course, you could say we d both been scooped about 500 years ago by one or more French craftsmen, but that kind of goes with
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 3, 2008
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      On Thu, July 3, 2008 2:42 pm, Jeff Johnson wrote:
      > That's a great looking plane and drill, Ulfhedinn. I'm a woodworker
      > who's been looking at getting into blacksmithing from a toolmaking side. My
      > intent has been to do the exact same project you are working on (curses,
      > scooped again!).
      >

      Thanks for the kind words. Of course, you could say we'd both been
      scooped about 500 years ago by one or more French craftsmen, but that kind
      of goes with replication!

      I don't see how the world would be harmed by two good sets of these tools,
      either. Especially if we live on opposite sides of the continent or
      something like that. OTOH, if you live nearby, perhaps we could
      collaborate. I'm a long way from finished on this, and knowing me it
      could take years.

      Speaking of collaboration, I'd welcome a chance to brainstorm details of
      this drawing with someone who shares my interest in it. Some of my
      interpretations are guesswork, and someone else might have an very useful
      insight I haven't thought of myself.

      Also, I've been working from a full-page B&W illo in the Metropolitan
      Museum's _Secular Spirit_ book. I know the original was in color; I've
      seen a small version on the Net, but haven't been able to find a high-res
      copy. If you have or can find such a thing, it might settle several
      questions I've had about materials, construction details, etc.

      If you go ahead making some of these tools yourself, I'd be glad to share
      details of what I've already done, if that would be helpful. A book I
      found extremely helpful was Alan Moore and Musaemura Sithole's _How to
      Make Carpentry Tools_, Intermediate Technology Publications ltd, London,
      1997. The ISBN is 1-85339-406-8 and you can order it online from Powells
      Books in Portland.

      They also have a companion volume, _Basic Blacksmithing_, by Harries and
      Heer. These are some of the best how-tos I've ever read--they include
      _all_ the steps in a way most books do not. They are written for village
      development teachers in Africa, and they assume that all wood needs to be
      sized and squared, and that all metal is scrounged not bought. They
      casually mention the use of old motor oil for a quench "if it is available
      in your area" and say the same thing about old oil drums. Have you ever
      been so far out in the boondocks that they don't have old oil drums? Or
      motor vehicles of any kind? Their first illustration of how to make a
      bellows shows a goat carcass hung up with a rope, and marked to show where
      you cut the skin. The skin is filled with sand and hung up in the sun,
      rubbed with vegetable oil and tenderized with a stick. When they say
      "basic" they really mean it.

      Another useful book is _Wooden Planes and how to Make Them_, by Perch and
      Lee, Algrove Publishing, Almonte, Ontario, 2001. ISBN 1-894572-49-1.

      Farid ther vel ok heill,

      Ulfhedinn
    • Jeff Johnson
      Ulfhedinn Thanks for the pointers. I ve picked up a couple of plane books and a friend is going to teach me smithing at his place, but I ll pick up the books
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 4, 2008
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        Ulfhedinn

        Thanks for the pointers. I've picked up a couple of plane books and a
        friend is going to teach me smithing at his place, but I'll pick up
        the books you mention to help get going. I plan on taking years on
        this project as well.

        I suspect that you are correct about not being the first to do this
        project. And we certainly don't conflict, with me being in Maryland.
        As with the Mastermyr chest, it's enticing in it's completeness. I can
        help with getting a better image. Here's a link to a place that sells
        copies of the image:

        http://tiny.cc/93a86

        My wife bought me a small poster from this place last year. I might be
        able to scan some portions of it for better study.

        Regards,

        Jeff/Geoff
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