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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re:Query on Joinery

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  • AlbionWood
    If you mean the Mastermyr chest, it is certainly not finger-jointed, which is what I think you mean by box joint . The sides are treenailed to the ends and to
    Message 1 of 41 , Jun 30, 2008
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      If you mean the Mastermyr chest, it is certainly not finger-jointed, which is what I think you mean by "box joint".  The sides are treenailed to the ends and to the bottom; the bottom is tenoned into the ends.  The somewhat unusual arrangement of notching the ends and sides together is an odd feature, but clearly nothing like a box joint. 

      Have you actually cut a box joint by hand?  If so, why?  (And if not, then how can you be so sure it is quicker and easier to cut than a dovetail?)

      Cheers,
      Tim


      Tracy Swanson wrote:
      I don't know, what about the period Viking box - what was the joining method but one big box joint? Box joints are quicker because you don't have to fiddle with the funky angles that a dovetail would entail (pardon the pun). It is merely a 90 degree, which would be easier to cut and file smooth than a dovetail would.
       
      Just a thought... ; )
      In Magical Service,
      Malaki
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Craig Robert Pierpont
      Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2008 9:56 AM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re:Query on Joinery

      The finger joint is a product of the process. The finger joint is a result of the invention of the circular saw and other woodworking stuff not developed until long after the medieval period.

      Craig Robert

    • tracystar2000
      Why, if I have never cut either joint by hand, am I making comments on their relative difficulty? Because I have cut enough joinery (by hand & machine) and
      Message 41 of 41 , Jul 2, 2008
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        Why, if I have never cut either joint by hand, am I making comments on
        their relative difficulty? Because I have cut enough joinery (by hand &
        machine) and carved enough wood to know the relative difficulty between
        the execution of the two joints.

        No, the box joint is not period - yes, the dovetail is. That question
        has been answered repeatedly over the last several days. The question
        of whether the box or dovetail was easier to cut by hand was then
        posed, to which I thought I would interject a bit of humor. Had I known
        that I would then be called on my "experience" as to whether or not I
        was quallified to answer the question (regardless of my experience in
        working and carving wood), I would have kept my fingers off of the
        keyboard and allowed you to continue to argue this non-period question
        ad nauseum.

        Argue on, I'll not interject again.
        Malaki
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