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[MedievalSawdust] Cooper's Information Find

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  • kjworz@comcast.net
    I just came back from Coopers to check on our communal kitchen trailer for repairs and such, and noticed something relevant to this group. Catty-corner from
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 25, 2008
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      I just came back from Coopers to check on our communal kitchen trailer for repairs and such, and noticed something relevant to this group.

      Catty-corner from the camp store is a building with flushies and showers and video games that was obviously a barn once.

      The exposed beams and joists are wonderful example of timber frame construction. There is bark still on the unworked sides, extensive use of adz and broad axe, and your standard mortise and tenon work. If you haven�t noticed or taken a look, it may be worth your while. While probably only 100 years old, timber frame methods haven�t changed much in 900 years. I want to make a closer look at the tool marks, myself. Changes over time have even left unused mortises to study, the tenon part long gone.


      --
      -Chris Schwartz
      Silver Spring, MD
    • conradh@efn.org
      ... That s so cool. I envy those of you who live in the East or Europe. I ve been in the oldest house in the Northwest--it was put up in 1837, with machine
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 25, 2008
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        On Wed, June 25, 2008 8:21 am, kjworz@... wrote:

        > The exposed beams and joists are wonderful example of timber frame
        > construction. There is bark still on the unworked sides, extensive use
        > of adz and broad axe, and your standard mortise and tenon work. If you
        > haven’t noticed or taken a look, it may be worth your while. While
        > probably only 100 years old, timber frame methods haven’t changed much in
        > 900 years. I want to make a closer look at the tool marks, myself.
        > Changes over time have even left unused mortises to study, the tenon part
        > long gone.

        That's so cool. I envy those of you who live in the East or Europe. I've
        been in the oldest house in the Northwest--it was put up in 1837, with
        machine -made nails and clapboards from the local sawmill. I told a
        Turkish friend from Istanbul about the visit, and he told me his family
        had cobwebs in the basement that were older than that.

        The only timber-frame originals I know of to explore around here are a few
        surviving Indian buildings, and they're all a long ways north of me. huge
        and impressive work though, like Stonehenge in timber. They did some nice
        mortice and tenon work, also tongue and groove, saddle notching and sewn
        joints for edge-to-edge work. On a smaller scale, their three-board
        chests are unique. The four sides are a single kerfed cedar plank, with
        the seams pegged or sewn, and all tight enough to hold water.

        Ulfhedinn
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