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Re: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

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  • Brian D.Murphy
    ... Actually he s talking about the piece of wood used to drive the froe. They are also called mauls. (See http://www.vannattabros.com/saw24.html for a quick
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 31, 1969
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      By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the "Handles" Of a froe.
      Wilhelm von Winkleried
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 7:33 AM
      Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

      Root ball?!  FROE CLUBS!!!!

      Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club.  The trunk of a
      dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the fiber addict in
      your life.

      (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking have someone
      close that is also into fiber?  Usually a wife.  Then there is Esther Heller,
      who is into all three...)




      > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
      > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
      > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
      > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
      >


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    • guydemontange
      I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place were felled recently. Although they ve been cut to firewood lengths already, there s still
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 17, 2003
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        I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place
        were felled recently. Although they've been cut to firewood lengths
        already, there's still some nice chunks out there.

        I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it seems a shame to me
        to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.

        The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
        have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
        None are currently split.

        My question is, what should I do to ensure the best usability out of
        the pieces? Should I store them outside under a tarp, or in the
        garage? Peel the bark, or leave it on? Wax the ends? Split the billets
        in advance, and let them cure that way? Saw them down to boards?

        I'm also open to any suggestions for uses.

        Guy de Mont Ange
      • marc adkins
        What I would do is Haul them into the garage and cover the ends with wax and let them sit about a year. We had a similar problem back in July when a major wind
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 17, 2003
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          What I would do is Haul them into the garage and cover the ends with wax and let them sit about a year. We had a similar problem back in July when a major wind storm hit our area. I ended up with more maple, mulberry and oak than I know what to do with
          Wilhelm von Winkleried
          MKA
          Marc Adkins
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 9:30 PM
          Subject: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

          I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place
          were felled recently. Although they've been cut to firewood lengths
          already, there's still some nice chunks out there.

          I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it seems a shame to me
          to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.

          The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
          have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
          None are currently split.

          My question is, what should I do to ensure the best usability out of
          the pieces? Should I store them outside under a tarp, or in the
          garage? Peel the bark, or leave it on? Wax the ends? Split the billets
          in advance, and let them cure that way? Saw them down to boards?

          I'm also open to any suggestions for uses.

          Guy de Mont Ange



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        • James Winkler
          Hummm... sounds like good turning stock (particularly the 12 stuff if billeted out properly... seal the ends so that it doesn t dry out too fast and start
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 17, 2003
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            Hummm... sounds like good turning stock (particularly the 12" stuff if billeted out properly...  seal the ends so that it doesn't dry out too fast and start checking and splitting all over the place... build a lathe... get some bowl turning tools... have way too much fun...
             
            Chas.

            >> I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it
            seems a shame to me
            to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.

            The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
            have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
            None are currently split.  <<
          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
            Fruit wood makes great handles, fiber working tools(spinning wheels, lace bobins, etc) pear is real nice for that just split the wood at the current cracks and
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 17, 2003
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              Fruit wood makes great handles, fiber working tools(spinning wheels, lace
              bobins, etc) pear is real nice for that just split the wood at the current
              cracks and keep it dry and away from bugs. Bugs and worms like fruit and
              some nut woods.

              James Cunningham
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "guydemontange" <guydemontange@...>
              To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 10:30 PM
              Subject: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood


              > I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place
              > were felled recently. Although they've been cut to firewood lengths
              > already, there's still some nice chunks out there.
              >
              > I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it seems a shame to me
              > to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.
              >
              > The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
              > have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
              > None are currently split.
              >
              > My question is, what should I do to ensure the best usability out of
              > the pieces? Should I store them outside under a tarp, or in the
              > garage? Peel the bark, or leave it on? Wax the ends? Split the billets
              > in advance, and let them cure that way? Saw them down to boards?
              >
              > I'm also open to any suggestions for uses.
              >
              > Guy de Mont Ange
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
            • The Luegges
              Mulberry? Really? What is it good for? By that I mean, what do you have in mind to make with it. I have a rather large mulberry that needs to come down soon
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 18, 2003
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                Mulberry? Really? What is it good for? By that I mean, what do you have in mind to make with it.  I have a rather large mulberry that needs to come down soon as well as a black walnut and the thought of using the walnut for turning had crossed my mind more than once (I am not sure there is a straight enough section of trunk to be worth having it planked). Has anyone else used Mulberry for anything and if so what?
                 
                Curious in S.W. Michigan (Oengus)
                 
                "O tell her, brief is life but love is long."
                - Alfred, Lord Tennyson
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: 9/17/03 10:47:35 PM
                Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

                What I would do is Haul them into the garage and cover the ends with wax and let them sit about a year. We had a similar problem back in July when a major wind storm hit our area. I ended up with more maple, mulberry and oak than I know what to do with
                Wilhelm von Winkleried
                MKA
                Marc Adkins
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 9:30 PM
                Subject: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

                I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place
                were felled recently. Although they've been cut to firewood lengths
                already, there's still some nice chunks out there.

                I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it seems a shame to me
                to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.

                The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
                have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
                None are currently split.

                My question is, what should I do to ensure the best usability out of
                the pieces? Should I store them outside under a tarp, or in the
                garage? Peel the bark, or leave it on? Wax the ends? Split the billets
                in advance, and let them cure that way? Saw them down to boards?

                I'm also open to any suggestions for uses.

                Guy de Mont Ange



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              • marc adkins
                due to the diameter of both the silver maple and mulberry (3 tops) I am just curing them to be turned into walking sticks. I don t have any idea of the
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 18, 2003
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                  due to the diameter of both the silver maple and mulberry (3" tops) I am just curing them to be turned into walking sticks. I don't have any idea of the properties of either wood.
                  Wilhelm von Winkleried
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 7:10 PM
                  Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

                  Mulberry? Really? What is it good for? By that I mean, what do you have in mind to make with it.  I have a rather large mulberry that needs to come down soon as well as a black walnut and the thought of using the walnut for turning had crossed my mind more than once (I am not sure there is a straight enough section of trunk to be worth having it planked). Has anyone else used Mulberry for anything and if so what?
                   
                  Curious in S.W. Michigan (Oengus)
                   
                  "O tell her, brief is life but love is long."
                  - Alfred, Lord Tennyson
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: 9/17/03 10:47:35 PM
                  Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

                  What I would do is Haul them into the garage and cover the ends with wax and let them sit about a year. We had a similar problem back in July when a major wind storm hit our area. I ended up with more maple, mulberry and oak than I know what to do with
                  Wilhelm von Winkleried
                  MKA
                  Marc Adkins
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 9:30 PM
                  Subject: [medievalsawdust] Question about curing fruitwood

                  I have been most fortunate in that some fruit trees behind my place
                  were felled recently. Although they've been cut to firewood lengths
                  already, there's still some nice chunks out there.

                  I have no idea yet what I'll do with them, but it seems a shame to me
                  to let pear, plum and cherry wood be used for firewood.

                  The chunks are no more than 12" diameter, and most are at least 6". I
                  have some pieces with no branches (and thus no knots) and some with.
                  None are currently split.

                  My question is, what should I do to ensure the best usability out of
                  the pieces? Should I store them outside under a tarp, or in the
                  garage? Peel the bark, or leave it on? Wax the ends? Split the billets
                  in advance, and let them cure that way? Saw them down to boards?

                  I'm also open to any suggestions for uses.

                  Guy de Mont Ange



                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  </ TT>

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                • twobears@cts.com
                  Gunaydin! Mulberry is a traditional wood in the Near- and Middle-East for stringed instruments (Turkish saz, Persian tar) Sasha Temur Khanlar - traditional
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 18, 2003
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                    Gunaydin!

                    Mulberry is a traditional wood in the Near- and Middle-East for stringed
                    instruments (Turkish saz, Persian tar)

                    Sasha
                    Temur Khanlar - traditional instruments, traditional music

                    Califia, Caid
                    (San Diego, California)


                    The Luegges writes:
                    >Mulberry? Really? What is it good for? By that I mean, what do you have in
                    mind to make with it. I have a rather large mulberry that needs to come
                    down soon as well as a black walnut and the thought of using the walnut for
                    turning had crossed my mind more than once (I am not sure there is a
                    straight enough section of trunk to be worth having it planked). Has anyone
                    else used Mulberry for anything and if so what?
                    >
                    >
                  • guydemontange
                    My dad has scored some mulberry from somewhere. Diameters up to about 6-8 and maybe larger, although I haven t inspected all of it. Just one piece that size
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 18, 2003
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                      My dad has scored some mulberry from somewhere. Diameters up to about
                      6-8" and maybe larger, although I haven't inspected all of it. Just
                      one piece that size that he had sitting on his table out back. He
                      mentioned to me that he had seen Norm Abrams pick up an unusually
                      large piece on one of his shows. Apparently 'tree' sized (which could
                      mean anything, but which I understand to mean about a foot or more in
                      diameter.)
                      The grain looked fairly open to me, though I am no expert, of course.
                      (1/4" between rings until you reached the outside half inch or so,
                      where they closed up into thin rings.)
                      Color seemed pretty dark, except for that outside half inch.
                      I think it might make good carving material, myself. He's planning on
                      taking a hatchet to a small diameter piece to square it up, and give
                      it to my mom for some chip carving practice. The rest I think is
                      probably destined to be burned. :(
                      Thanks, by the way, to everyone who commented. Next I need to decide
                      how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
                      fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
                      root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
                      some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?

                      Guy de MA


                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "The Luegges" <luegge@e...>
                      wrote:
                      > Mulberry? Really? What is it good for? By that I mean, what do you
                      have in mind to make with it. I have a rather large mulberry that
                      needs to come down soon as well as a black walnut and the thought of
                      using the walnut for turning had crossed my mind more than once (I am
                      not sure there is a straight enough section of trunk to be worth
                      having it planked). Has anyone else used Mulberry for anything and if
                      so what?
                      >
                      > Curious in S.W. Michigan (Oengus)
                      >
                      > "O tell her, brief is life but love is long."
                      > - Alfred, Lord Tennyson
                      >
                    • kjworz@comcast.net
                      Root ball?! FROE CLUBS!!!! Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club. The trunk of a dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 19, 2003
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                        Root ball?! FROE CLUBS!!!!

                        Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club. The trunk of a
                        dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the fiber addict in
                        your life.

                        (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking have someone
                        close that is also into fiber? Usually a wife. Then there is Esther Heller,
                        who is into all three...)




                        > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
                        > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
                        > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
                        > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
                        >
                      • marc adkins
                        By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the Handles Of a froe. Wilhelm von Winkleried ... From: kjworz@comcast.net To:
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 19, 2003
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                          By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the "Handles" Of a froe.
                          Wilhelm von Winkleried
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 7:33 AM
                          Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

                          Root ball?!  FROE CLUBS!!!!

                          Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club.  The trunk of a
                          dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the fiber addict in
                          your life.

                          (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking have someone
                          close that is also into fiber?  Usually a wife.  Then there is Esther Heller,
                          who is into all three...)




                          > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
                          > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
                          > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
                          > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
                          >


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                          medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                        • marc adkins
                          Thanks for the link. Wilhelm von Winkleried ... From: Brian D.Murphy To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 6:09 AM Subject: Re:
                          Message 12 of 14 , Sep 19, 2003
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                            Thanks for the link.
                            Wilhelm von Winkleried
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 6:09 AM
                            Subject: Re: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood


                            >
                            >By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the "Handles" Of a froe

                            Actually he's talking about the piece of wood used to drive the froe. They are also called mauls. (See http://www.vannattabros.com/saw24.html for a quick explanation).  Root wood was preferred because the wood is much harder.

                            Bran


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                            By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the "Handles" Of a froe.
                            Wilhelm von Winkleried
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 7:33 AM
                            Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

                            Root ball?!  FROE CLUBS!!!!

                            Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club.  The trunk of a
                            dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the fiber addict in
                            your life.

                            (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking have someone
                            close that is also into fiber?  Usually a wife.  Then there is Esther Heller,
                            who is into all three...)




                            > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
                            > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
                            > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
                            > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
                            >


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                            medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                            No he means a froe club. In days gone by the rule was to never hit iron with iron. If you did you would beat the tool out of shape like you see on the back
                            Message 13 of 14 , Sep 19, 2003
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                              No he means a froe club.  In days gone by the rule was to never hit iron with iron.  If you did you would beat the tool out of shape like you see on the back of many older froes.  The only ones who used iron on iron were stone workers who needed the sharp hit to shape stones in to blocks.
                               
                              James Cunningham
                              If you need the reference I will find it.
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 11:49 AM
                              Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

                              By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the "Handles" Of a froe.
                              Wilhelm von Winkleried
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 7:33 AM
                              Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood

                              Root ball?!  FROE CLUBS!!!!

                              Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club.  The trunk of a
                              dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the fiber addict in
                              your life.

                              (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking have someone
                              close that is also into fiber?  Usually a wife.  Then there is Esther Heller,
                              who is into all three...)




                              > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls from these
                              > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm thinking the
                              > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth doing
                              > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
                              >


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                              medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                            • guydemontange
                              *sighs* This group is simply amazing. Thanks, folks! Guy de M.A. ... iron with iron. If you did you would beat the tool out of shape like you see on the back
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 19, 2003
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                                *sighs*
                                This group is simply amazing.
                                Thanks, folks!
                                Guy de M.A.

                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
                                <cunning@f...> wrote:
                                > No he means a froe club. In days gone by the rule was to never hit
                                iron with iron. If you did you would beat the tool out of shape like
                                you see on the back of many older froes. The only ones who used iron
                                on iron were stone workers who needed the sharp hit to shape stones in
                                to blocks.
                                >
                                > James Cunningham
                                > If you need the reference I will find it.
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: marc adkins
                                > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 11:49 AM
                                > Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing fruitwood
                                >
                                >
                                > By froe clubs I am assuming that you are talking about the
                                "Handles" Of a froe.
                                > Wilhelm von Winkleried
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: kjworz@c...
                                > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 7:33 AM
                                > Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Question about curing
                                fruitwood
                                >
                                >
                                > Root ball?! FROE CLUBS!!!!
                                >
                                > Though dogwood would be superior for a root ball froe club. The
                                trunk of a
                                > dogwood should be used for making loom shuttle to please the
                                fiber addict in
                                > your life.
                                >
                                > (Have you noticed that a lot of guys into SCA and woodworking
                                have someone
                                > close that is also into fiber? Usually a wife. Then there is
                                Esther Heller,
                                > who is into all three...)
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > > how much effort I should put into acquiring the root balls
                                from these
                                > > fruit trees. The backhoe will be out on Monday, and I'm
                                thinking the
                                > > root areas might have some interesting qualities, and be worth
                                doing
                                > > some extra work to get ahold of. Thoughts, anyone?
                                > >
                                >
                                >
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