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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: wood question

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  • julian wilson
    ... QUOTE If you look through 15th -16th c. illuminations (and paintings, and tapestries) you will indeed see a lot of unpainted furniture. You can also find
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 13, 2008
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      --- On Fri, 13/6/08, AlbionWood <albionwood@...> wrote:
      QUOTE
      If you look through 15th -16th c. illuminations (and paintings, and tapestries) you will indeed see a lot of unpainted furniture. You can also find quite a lot of it in museums, including some very high-quality (and obviously upper-market) carved pieces. But go to 13th c. French MSS and you will search in vain for a piece of unpainted wooden furniture! SNIPPED FOR BREVITY
      Can we please remember to include some temporal and cultural referents to identify the "period" we are talking about, whenever we make these kinds of statements? UNQUOTE

      COMMENT
      Thank you, Colin, I couldn't have described the situation any better myself. The "Treaty of Calais Chest" comes to mind as an example of an artifact which has remained in Government archives ever since the signing of the Treaty, and is therefore unlikely to have been re-decorated at any time. It's very-thoroughly painted; and the paintwork is original to the time of the Treaty.
      There are pictures of the chest on line.
      I realise that "one swallow doesn't make a summer" - but I was aware [in making my own earlier statements on this subject elsewhere]  -  of the existance of at least some of the 13th and 14th century illustrations that you cite. And of the highly-organised supra-national Trading network that covered the whole of Western Europe during that period.
      "Fashion" was then - [and to a certain extent is now - ] a high-value, low-weight trade item,  - and I have always argued that those burghers, gentles, and Nobles with the money to spend would have "followed the fashions" whenever possible.
       
      Servus,
      Matthew Baker
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