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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Period paint finishes (was: wood question)

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  • jtstewart@westnet.com.au
    In The Craftsman s Handbook Il Libro dell Arte by Cennino d Andrea Cennini written in Florence during the 15th century (1437 maybe) is a description of how
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 12, 2008
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      In "The Craftsman's Handbook" "Il Libro dell'Arte" by Cennino
      d'Andrea Cennini written in Florence during the 15th century (1437
      maybe) is a description of how to turn gold or silver leaf into
      paint.

      Basically it suggests you take 10 or 20 gold or silver leaves on a
      porphyry slab and work it up with some well beaten white of egg, then
      put it into a little glazed dish with enough tempera for it to flow
      from the quill or brush. You grind it with gum arabic for use on
      parchment.

      p102, Dover edition, 1960.

      So there you go. The method that at least one person used to make
      metallic paints in medieval times.
      Cheers
      John of the Hills

      ---- Original Message ----
      From: tstar2000@...
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Period paint finishes (was: wood
      question)
      Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2008 17:07:28 -0500

      >Just as today paint was given an opalescent appearance by adding
      >crushed
      >oyster shell. Metallic paints I would assume would have powders of
      >that
      >metal added, similar to bronzing powders.
      >
      >In Magical Service,
      >Malaki
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      >[mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Trevor Payne
      > Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2008 12:17 PM
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Period paint finishes (was: wood
      >question)
      >
      >
      > can you point me in the direction of research on that? I
      >have not
      >heard of gold painting. Only gold leaf gilding.
      >
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