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Re: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer

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  • Oakes, George
    I may not have stated this before but the trailer is 13foot long from the tounge to the back and 6foot wide. The cargo area is 6 x9 10 . So its not a rinky
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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      Re: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer

      I may not have stated this before but the trailer is 13foot long from the tounge to the back and 6foot wide. The cargo area is 6'x9' 10".

      So its not a rinky dink trailer. It is a single axle though. But the axle is pretty beefy.

      --------------------------
      Sent from my BlackBerry Wireless Device


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Mon Jun 02 11:56:00 2008
      Subject: Re: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer

      Depends what you're facing it with...  If the material is pretty sturdy in it's own right i.e. 1/2" marine-grade plywood and the studs are just providing a framework to hold it up, go with 24" to reduce weight.  This is also a factor of how big of a trailer you're looking at building.  A heavy plywood and 2x4 frame would potentially max out the load of a cheap 4'x8' trailer reducing the 2x4's to 2x2's using thinner plywood, increasing the spacing, and using diagonal cables to tension the framework against racking (leaning one way or the other out of square), you can build a much lighter framework with much wider spacing than even 24" that would be every bit as strong and reliable.

      --Alysaundre Weldon d'Ath
      Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

      gavin.kinkade wrote:

              rather simple question I hope.
             
              When making the studs for the walls, houses use 18 inches between
              studs? and garages and non-living spaces sometimes use 24 inches
              between studs?
             
              what would you guys recommend for stud distances? 18" or 24"?
             
              The trailer will be towed on the highway at speeds around 60 mph.
             
              Thanks
              Gavin
             
              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com <mailto:medievalsawdust%40yahoogroups.com> , <maf@...> <mailto:maf@...>  wrote:
              >
              > I stripped a trailer apart a couple of years ago for the frame and
              it had the black landscape fabric. You can buy the same fabric from
              an industrial fabric supplier, it's called endbond and last time I
              used it came in 60" wide rolls and was about $1 per linear yard if
              you purchased a 250 yard roll. It's nice it stops most water and will
              breath, they also use it for the underside of high end couches (as
              opposed to that really thin stuff on cheaper furniture). It only has
              one problem, it has an affinity for hydrocarbons. If you spill oil or
              grease on it they never come out because the polypropelene the
              endbound is made of bounds with it. You can also weld this fabric
              together with an impulse heater to make a very strong perfect seam.
              >
              > Mark
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Ralph Lindberg
              > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com <mailto:medievalsawdust%40yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2008 7:54 AM
              > Subject: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer
              >
              >
              > You've already gotten some great advise, another idea is to use
              the
              > same material as RV manufacturers put underneath their plywood
              floors.
              > It is a (generally) black, woven fabric that allows water vapor to
              > pass, but stops the liquid. This allows the plywood to dry out
              (really
              > important)
              > You should be able to buy this material from your local RV store
              or
              > Camping World (chain camping supply store)
              > I couldn't find it on-line (in a 30 second search), but I know the
              > stuff exists and you can buy it, because I have bought and used it
              >
              > Ralg
              > AnTir
              >
             
             



    • Rebekah d'Avignon
      Ripping a 2 x 4 into 3 pieces each being (a true) 1 1/2 x 1 in should be strong enough. I would brace the leading end (front) to prevent racking from the
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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        Ripping a 2 x 4 into 3 pieces each being (a true) 1 1/2 x 1 in should be strong enough. I would brace the leading end (front) to prevent racking from the headwind....that is, run a support diagonally from the top-front to the bottom-middle or bottom-rear. I know that some of the box stores sell sheet aluminum, but you could probably go cheaper at a specialty store. You also might want to check into buying a wheel lock so that someone doesn't drive off with your trailer (they cut the hitch locks). A good wheel lock will cost you a couple hundred dollars, but it's cheaper than replacing everything.
         
        Just a thought.


        RdA
        Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

      • Trevor Payne
        Actually I would think something like this:
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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          Actually I would think something like this:

          http://www.heartlandlock.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=46&zenid=2389d22f516f28e7f37b7f6169c02f62

          Would be sufficient. I mean if the theives are willing to use a cutting torch to get at the trailer, no lock is going to keep them out. :)

          Aiden
          From: Rebekah d'Avignon <rebekahdavignon@...>
          .....
          You also might want to check into buying a wheel lock so that someone doesn't drive off with your trailer (they cut the hitch locks). A good wheel lock will cost you a couple hundred dollars, but it's cheaper than replacing everything.
           
          Just a thought.


          RdA
          Tools alone do not a craftsman make.


        • Tracy Swanson
          The closer the studs, the stronger the structure, but also the heavier. 24 would be the better option for a trailer - better yet, save on weight and use metal
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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            The closer the studs, the stronger the structure, but also the heavier. 24" would be the better option for a trailer - better yet, save on weight and use metal studs. Once the sheeting is attached they become monolithic.
             
            In Magical Service,
            Malaki
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of gavin.kinkade
            Sent: Monday, June 02, 2008 9:40 AM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SPAM][MedievalSawdust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer

            rather simple question I hope.

            When making the studs for the walls, houses use 18 inches between
            studs? and garages and non-living spaces sometimes use 24 inches
            between studs?

            what would you guys recommend for stud distances? 18" or 24"?

            The trailer will be towed on the highway at speeds around 60 mph.

            Thanks
            Gavin

            --- In medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com, <maf@...> wrote:
            >
            > I stripped a trailer apart a couple of years ago for the frame and
            it had the black landscape fabric. You can buy the same fabric from
            an industrial fabric supplier, it's called endbond and last time I
            used it came in 60" wide rolls and was about $1 per linear yard if
            you purchased a 250 yard roll. It's nice it stops most water and will
            breath, they also use it for the underside of high end couches (as
            opposed to that really thin stuff on cheaper furniture). It only has
            one problem, it has an affinity for hydrocarbons. If you spill oil or
            grease on it they never come out because the polypropelene the
            endbound is made of bounds with it. You can also weld this fabric
            together with an impulse heater to make a very strong perfect seam.
            >
            > Mark
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Ralph Lindberg
            > To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
            > Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2008 7:54 AM
            > Subject: [SPAM][MedievalSawd ust] Re: RE-Making a Trailer
            >
            >
            > You've already gotten some great advise, another idea is to use
            the
            > same material as RV manufacturers put underneath their plywood
            floors.
            > It is a (generally) black, woven fabric that allows water vapor to
            > pass, but stops the liquid. This allows the plywood to dry out
            (really
            > important)
            > You should be able to buy this material from your local RV store
            or
            > Camping World (chain camping supply store)
            > I couldn't find it on-line (in a 30 second search), but I know the
            > stuff exists and you can buy it, because I have bought and used it
            >
            > Ralg
            > AnTir
            >

          • Liedtke Goetz
            What about tension panels - like a hollow-core door? You could use the 1.5 *1 structural members with a 1/4 hardboard or plywood surface panel glued to the
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 2, 2008
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              What about tension panels - like a hollow-core door? You could use
              the 1.5"*1" structural members with a 1/4" hardboard or plywood surface
              panel glued to the structures (you can also use other fasteners). The
              skin acts as both a structural support (as in the 1/2" plywood
              mentioned in an earlier message) and as a tension member equivalent to
              the wire cross-braces.

              I have a closet filled with shelves made from tension panels and I
              put very heavy objects on the shelves.

              Götz

              --- Rebekah d'Avignon <rebekahdavignon@...> wrote:

              > Ripping a 2 x 4 into 3 pieces each being (a true) 1 1/2 x 1 in should
              > be strong enough. I would brace the leading end (front) to prevent
              > racking from the headwind....that is, run a support diagonally from
              > the top-front to the bottom-middle or bottom-rear. I know that some
              > of the box stores sell sheet aluminum, but you could probably go
              > cheaper at a specialty store. You also might want to check into
              > buying a wheel lock so that someone doesn't drive off with your
              > trailer (they cut the hitch locks). A good wheel lock will cost you a
              > couple hundred dollars, but it's cheaper than replacing everything.
              >
              > Just a thought.
              >
              >
              > RdA
              > Tools alone do not a craftsman make.
              >
              >
              >
            • Rebekah d'Avignon
              For some reason my browser (or whatever) doesn t like those strings. However, they have the Trimax wheel lock which is an example of what I was talking about.
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 3, 2008
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                For some reason my browser (or whatever) doesn't like those strings.
                However, they have the Trimax wheel lock which is an example of what I was talking about.


                Trevor Payne <littleaiden@...> wrote:
                Actually I would think something like this:

                http://www.heartlan dlock.com/ index.php? main_page= product_info&products_id= 46&zenid=2389d22f516f2 8e7f37b7f6169c02 f62

                Would be sufficient. I mean if the theives are willing to use a cutting torch to get at the trailer, no lock is going to keep them out. :)

                Aiden
                .




                RdA
                Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

              • Rebekah d'Avignon
                You are talking about a Torsion Box. I understand that they are incredibly strong and not difficult (there s a relative term) to make. One person made a
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 3, 2008
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                  You are talking about a Torsion Box. I understand that they are incredibly strong and not difficult (there's a relative term) to make. One person made a torsion box shelf then considered listing his house as "For Sale: shelf with house attached".
                   
                  The point that I was trying to make (and others as well) is that the repeated pressure of air on the front of the trailer will  tend to push it into a parallelagram instead of a rectangle - like the mast on a ship. A round-nose trailer would help alleviate that, but is more difficult to make.


                  Liedtke Goetz <goetzliedtke@...> wrote:
                  What about tension panels - like a hollow-core door? You could use
                  the 1.5"*1" structural members with a 1/4" hardboard or plywood surface
                  panel glued to the structures (you can also use other fasteners). The
                  skin acts as both a structural support (as in the 1/2" plywood
                  mentioned in an earlier message) and as a tension member equivalent to
                  the wire cross-braces.

                  I have a closet filled with shelves made from tension panels and I
                  put very heavy objects on the shelves.

                  Götz
                  .




                  RdA
                  Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

                • Liedtke Goetz
                  ... That s probably the correct name. They are very strong. ... Well, the way that trailer manufacturers handle this is to build a vee-shaped nose. If you
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 3, 2008
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                    --- Rebekah d'Avignon <rebekahdavignon@...> wrote:

                    > You are talking about a Torsion Box.

                    That's probably the correct name. They are very strong.

                    > The point that I was trying to make (and others as well) is that
                    > the repeated pressure of air on the front of the trailer will tend
                    > to push it into a parallelagram instead of a rectangle - like the
                    > mast on a ship.

                    Well, the way that trailer manufacturers handle this is to build a
                    vee-shaped nose. If you look at trailers in the parking lot of Lowes
                    or Home Depot, the shorter trailers that can reasonably be expected to
                    be in the "wind shadow" of the towing vehicle have flat fronts. Once
                    you get to the larger trailers, you'll see vee-shaped fronts. If the
                    trailer chassis is not vee-shaped, one can build the shape partially on
                    the square front and partially on the tongue.

                    Götz
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