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Pictures of Recent Work

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  • bayard_turner
    Greetings to thelist, I posted some pictures of recent work to my album - Bayard s Work I made the 3-legged Backstool based on pictures posted on Tom
    Message 1 of 6 , May 30, 2008
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      Greetings to thelist,

      I posted some pictures of recent work to my album - "Bayard's Work"

      I made the 3-legged Backstool based on pictures posted on Tom Rettie's
      site. I think I got the overall proportions right, but failed to
      start with the critical measurement - distance from the front of the
      seat to the back. I ended up with a stool that requires you to perch
      on the very front rung. The only option I've come up with is to cut
      off the tall post and make a simple 3-legged stool which allows for
      more "overhang". Since this was my first attempt, I used poplar -
      inexpensive and easy to turn.

      The little footstool was a class project from a class I took at the
      Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, TN. Probably not
      period but I wasn't playing then. Also in poplar, with a chattered
      cherry disk inset to hide the screw-chuck hole.

      Finally, the little knock-down camping stool is somethng I put
      together to take to a camping event next weekend. I found a
      relatively straight and flat 1x10, 6 feet long, at a local yard, so
      the proportions were dictated by the wood at hand. It sits 16" tall,
      the legs are cut at a 10-degree angle. In order to make it easy to
      fold, I hinged the braces to the top - knock the legs off, fold the
      braces in, and the whole thing stacks up to 9-1/4"x22"x3". Not
      exactly period, but it passes the "3-ft test" as long as they don't
      pick it up and look underneath.

      Other projects in the works - a spring-pole lathe (first you have to
      build it, then figure out how to use it!) and the poles to support a
      sun shade made from a 9x12 canvas tarp.

      Is anyone else working on things to take to events this summer?

      Bayard the Turner
      Shire of Korsvag
      Northshiled
    • kirkdrago
      ... wrote: ... Well, not for me, but I m doing a Canfield Coffer workshop at the end of June. I m figuring to turn out 6 or 7 cooler boxes that day.
      Message 2 of 6 , May 31, 2008
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        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "bayard_turner" <williams@...>
        wrote:>
        > Is anyone else working on things to take to events this summer?
        >
        > Bayard the Turner
        > Shire of Korsvag
        > Northshiled
        >
        Well, not for me, but I'm doing a Canfield Coffer workshop at the end
        of June. I'm figuring to turn out 6 or 7 cooler boxes that day.
        Something for people headed for Pennsic, even though I can't go.

        I've held a couple of these before, and I primarily have the ladies in
        our local group show up. The gleam in various eyes as they get turned
        loose with power tools is almost frightening. (As a side note: the
        first half hour is spent on safety for those of you who might be
        wondering.) But we've managed to outfit the local canton with inkle
        looms, kumihimo looms, and a few assorted boxes, stools and tables.

        KirkD
      • scott gates
        This year we got lucky with some randomly free hardwood. We built a portable bar, to go with our bar on wheels. I will be laying finish on it the second week
        Message 3 of 6 , May 31, 2008
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          This year we got lucky with some randomly free hardwood.
          We built a portable bar, to go with our bar on wheels. I will be laying finish on it the second week of June.
          I will post a picture or two of it as it was being built. The front is our trademark burninated Pine. The sides are Maple plywood. The top being made from two Oak 2x12s. The top must weigh over 100 lbs. We put a padd railing on it with old water bed frame parts, and then put a strip of oak trim down to hide the screws in the railing.
          The padding is removable, with pine 2x4s underneath.  It runs six and half feet long, 24 inches deep, and the bar surface is 42 inches high. Supporting this, it 2 boxes built from old dorm loft 2x4 scraps. I installed a shelf for bottles, that is removable. To keep the bar top, and boxes in place, I also installed a sheet of 5/8 play, and a couple of 2x4s, that can if needs be screwed into the box frames. Except for a couple well hidden 1 inch screws on the facing, all the other hard ware is hidden, and applied from within. I also got a couple wrought iron 42 inch high Shepard's cooks to hang lamps that I will be making. They will be wooden boxes (pine or oak depends on what I can scrounge), with tin inserts. I will do some decorative scroll work on them, and paint the out faces in wrought iron black. Light will be reflected out the bottom, to light the bar, and surrounding areas.

          The next project is building a couple tents of the same or close design as are already in my pictures folder, using Red Oak, and Maple 4x3s we got donated. They will weigh even more then what we have already built, but gods they will be a thing of beauty. We only use this stuff for Pennsic, and it is huge, and heavy, and a pain to transport.

          Evil is, as Evil does



          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          From: kith@...
          Date: Sat, 31 May 2008 17:36:46 +0000
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Pictures of Recent Work

          --- In medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com, "bayard_turner" <williams@.. .>
          wrote:>
          > Is anyone else working on things to take to events this summer?
          >
          > Bayard the Turner
          > Shire of Korsvag
          > Northshiled
          >
          Well, not for me, but I'm doing a Canfield Coffer workshop at the end
          of June. I'm figuring to turn out 6 or 7 cooler boxes that day.
          Something for people headed for Pennsic, even though I can't go.

          I've held a couple of these before, and I primarily have the ladies in
          our local group show up. The gleam in various eyes as they get turned
          loose with power tools is almost frightening. (As a side note: the
          first half hour is spent on safety for those of you who might be
          wondering.) But we've managed to outfit the local canton with inkle
          looms, kumihimo looms, and a few assorted boxes, stools and tables.

          KirkD




          Make every e-mail and IM count. Join the i’m Initiative from Microsoft.
        • gunwaldt
          ... The work looks nice. What are your seat height & width measurements? From the pics the seat appears to be an equilateral triangle, so the depth is
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2008
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            > I made the 3-legged Backstool based on pictures
            > posted on Tom Rettie's site. I think I got the
            > overall proportions right, but failed to start
            > with the critical measurement - distance from the
            > front of the seat to the back. I ended up with a
            > stool that requires you to perch on the very front rung.

            The work looks nice. What are your seat height & width measurements?
            From the pics the seat appears to be an equilateral triangle, so the
            depth is limited. Expanding the dimensions to create an "ample" seat
            may well cost you the proportions you desire. Or you could use an
            isosceles triangle to give you greater depth to the chair back.

            > The only option I've come up with is to cut off the
            > tall post and make a simple 3-legged stool . . .

            You could give it to someone of slender stature :>

            > Is anyone else working on things to take to events this summer?

            Most of my work this spring has been on tent poles for friends to kick
            off the camping season.

            Gunwaldt
            keep making sawdust!
          • bayard_turner
            I started with the seat height as my basis - I measured a standard chair and came up with 18 Eyeballing the pictures Tom Rettie posted, and a number of the
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 3, 2008
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              I started with the seat height as my basis - I measured a standard
              chair and came up with 18" Eyeballing the pictures Tom Rettie posted,
              and a number of the period paintings he referenced (and a bunch more I
              came across as I looked into the idea), I ended up with an equilateral
              triangle about 15" on a side, which gave me only 13" front to back.

              In hindsight, I realize that most of the stools shown in the paintings
              are fairly tall - in many, they seem to be used interchagably as a
              stool or a side table - check out Pieter Aertsen's "Peasants by the
              Hearth" http://www.wga.hu/art/a/aertsen/merry_co.jpg I could
              probably have kept the same proportions, but made it 22" tall and
              18.5" on a side and fit pretty well with the images.

              Thanks for your suggestions!

              Bayard

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "gunwaldt" <gunwaldt@...> wrote:
              >
              > > I made the 3-legged Backstool based on pictures
              > > posted on Tom Rettie's site. I think I got the
              > > overall proportions right, but failed to start
              > > with the critical measurement - distance from the
              > > front of the seat to the back. I ended up with a
              > > stool that requires you to perch on the very front rung.
              >
              > The work looks nice. What are your seat height & width measurements?
              > From the pics the seat appears to be an equilateral triangle, so the
              > depth is limited. Expanding the dimensions to create an "ample" seat
              > may well cost you the proportions you desire. Or you could use an
              > isosceles triangle to give you greater depth to the chair back.
              >
            • AlbionWood
              A lot of the Gothic boarded stools from the 15th -16th centuries appear to be taller than a modern chair seat, and are also frequently shown in use as side
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 3, 2008
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                A lot of the Gothic boarded stools from the 15th -16th centuries appear to be taller than a modern chair seat, and are also frequently shown in use as side tables.  Some surviving stools in European museums are around 22" tall.

                One thing I've noticed: when you're wearing joined hose, it's easier to "perch" on a taller stool than to sit in a chair.  Is it coincidence that these stools appear around the same time as joined hose?

                Cheers,
                Colin


                bayard_turner wrote:
                I started with the seat height as my basis - I measured a standard
                chair and came up with 18"  Eyeballing the pictures Tom Rettie posted,
                and a number of the period paintings he referenced (and a bunch more I
                came across as I looked into the idea), I ended up with an equilateral
                triangle about 15" on a side, which gave me only 13" front to back.
                
                In hindsight, I realize that most of the stools shown in the paintings
                are fairly tall - in many, they seem to be used interchagably as a
                stool or a side table - check out Pieter Aertsen's "Peasants by the
                Hearth"  http://www.wga.hu/art/a/aertsen/merry_co.jpg  I could
                probably have kept the same proportions, but made it 22" tall and
                18.5" on a side and fit pretty well with the images.
                  
                  
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