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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Digest Number 1976

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  • Dan Baker
    I have never understood the distressing or artificial aging of projects for the SCA. I know many who have done it. And by trying to use period wood, you are
    Message 1 of 2 , May 24, 2008
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      I have never understood the distressing or artificial aging of projects for the SCA.  I know many who have done it.  And by trying to use period wood, you are doing the same thing.  Like Master Avery said, they didn't use 600 year old wood in the 1400s, why would we?  I would rather see someone harvest the wood in a period manor, and work it in a period manor as well.  A period artisan is going to make something brand new.  So if we try to do anything else we lose authenticity in my book. 

      Sure we don't have access to even the same species.  But I can also make a case that a carpenter in England is going to use different wood then one in say Poland or Russia.  I found an example of viking beds on a funeral ship where the same design beds where one ship they were all made from ash and the other ship they were all made from oak.  My guess is when the order came in one guy had a pile of oak handy and they other guy had a pile of ash all ready to go. (Oseberg and Gokstad ships if anyone is interested).  To my way of thinking this shows that the carpenters were thrifty, and used available materials.  So if we in the modern world use available materials, white oak, ash, even maple we are being true to the methods and materials of the day.  Now if you come in with plastics and pressure treated lumber..... then we can talk.

      -Rhys

      On Sat, May 24, 2008 at 2:57 PM, Avery Austringer <avery1415@...> wrote:

      >I wasn't suggesting that Misi should actually do that.
      >Merely that for some people free timber that is actually dateable to
      the >SCA period - or to any other re-enactment period, Say the
      Napoleonic War >or even the "War Between The States" - or the "Crimean
      War" - is more >valuable than free timber that isn't dateable.

      While there are some pretty major differences that can be attributed to
      climate, growing conditions and the like, is it reasonable to expect
      that if you had some 600 year old-ish wood, it look or behave at all
      like it did when it was cut in the 1400's? Or would you get a better
      match if you got wood of the same species that was recently cut?

      Seems a little like converting to Catholicism for that added bit of
      authenticity.

      Avery




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