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16219RE: [MedievalSawdust] piercers and wimbling irons

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  • Hall, Hayward
    Mar 24, 2014

      Here’s a set of images of creating a spoon bit and brace.  Sorry all the text is on FB.  Havent had a chance to put it on the website.  It’s really not overly complicated to make as long as you realize you need to make a dedicated swage/fuller for each size.  I made ¼” and ½”.  They work fantastically.  I also can’t imagine these selling well since they would have to be priced rather high to be worth making.

       

      http://personal.evangel.edu/hallh/web/medievalstuff/woodworking/spoonbit1.jpg

      http://personal.evangel.edu/hallh/web/medievalstuff/woodworking/spoonbit2.jpg

      http://personal.evangel.edu/hallh/web/medievalstuff/woodworking/spoonbit3.jpg

      http://personal.evangel.edu/hallh/web/medievalstuff/woodworking/spoonbit4.jpg

      http://personal.evangel.edu/hallh/web/medievalstuff/woodworking/spoonbit5.jpg

       

      There are so many things like period tools and locks that one can make to sell but come with inherent issues of tweaking and maintenance that unless you (the user) know how to do upkeep on it, it may cease to function for you.  Some are rather delicate, some rather finicky simply because that’s the way they work.  I don’t like the idea that someone would be unsatisfied with my product simply because they fail to grasp what it really represents.  Discuss.

       

       

      Guillaume

       

      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Baron Valerian of Somerset
      Sent: Monday, March 24, 2014 9:58 AM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] piercers and wimbling irons

       



      That should work.  When I'm turning, I often use a spindle gouge to drill a clearance hole for end grain pieces, rather than taking the time to switch to a drill.  Works fine.  Never tried it off the lathe, but should still work the same when turning the tool, rather than the work.   

       

      -Valerian

       

       

      On Mar 24, 2014, at 10:23 AM, kaisaerpren@... wrote:



      Hi all;

      I have been puzzling ("he puzzled and puzzed until his puzzler was sore") for some time about how to simulate historic examples of small wood boring implements.

      I have  two 19th century gimlets that are nearly Identical to 15th and 16th century ones, so I'm good to go there.

      i also have a nice set of new spoon bits made to go in a 19th century style chuck. I could permanently mount one or two in wooden braces. (4 of them , they go from 1/4 to 5/8 +-.  I'd like to find 1" and 1 1/2" spoons, not right now.)

      It's the shell augers I can't get/find. You know the ones that are like a long half cylinder sharpened sort of rounded at it's tip. Very like a spoon bit that has been sharpened so many times it's "spoon" tip part is gone. in sizes smaller than 1/4".

      Every "blacksmith" in the SCA seems to want to make either only knives or only armor. maybe I find one who occasionally makes throwing axes.

      well i'm looking through my copy of "manual of traditional wood carving" by Paul Hasluck. haven't cracked it open in years, and I think I've found my answer. there is a photo of someone using a small deep gouge to drill holes for pierced work. 

      tell me if I'm crazy! I take a small deep gouge, reshape the tip to cut right on deeper holes, and replace the handle with a medieval looking brace stock! viola!

      be well

      K

       

       

       




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