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15713Re: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

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  • Jerry Harder
    May 6 1:11 AM
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      I modified my wood lathe to except a larger piece of wood/log than it was meant to.  Turned it on and the whole thing started  walking across the garage floor.   Undetoured, I pulled the plug, put a larger pulley on the motor and a smaller one on the spindle to slow in down, and piled the lower shelf full of anvils and concrete blocks.  This worked-well sort of.  The cheep "made in China" lathe tool I was using cought, bent, and caused my pinky to get sucked into the lathe.  That caused the permanent loss of a mouse sized bite of my left little finger.  I made new lathe tools on my forge out of 3/4 inch rebar and finished the job.  There's a lesson (maybe several) in there somewhere. Just say'in.

      On 5/3/2013 10:12 PM, Justin Crouch wrote:  
      ""Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
       
      Lagerstein""

      Done something like that before, didn't go to the bone, but I've cut myself plenty while working both wood and horn...although I never learn. lol

      LeO


      On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 6:45 PM, Dave Ordway <dabugler@...> wrote:
       

      Trimming a drinking horn stand made from a freshly cut limb with a chisel whist holding it and shaving a knot toward my hand.  Never do that again.  Chisel went straight to the bone.  Thankfully it was sharp and my son was available to provide paper towels.  A little super glue and a bandaid resulted in full recovery without even a scare.
       
      Lagerstein
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2013 1:00 AM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Woodworking Safety Day

       

      01 May is Woodworking Safety Day (used to be a whole week). I know I've gotten into some interesting challenges when working on reproduction pieces, I'm betting a few of the rest of you have as well. Anyone up for sharing the most useful woodworking safety thoughts?

      For me, I'd have to say that trying to cut a tenon or kerf without having something other than my off hand and clenched knees to hold the stock is a bad idea that no one should ever attempt.


      Vels


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