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12180Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: New.. Intro~ Hi..Want to Make A 2-Wheel Cart For a Portable Oven

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  • Sean Powell
    Mar 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      My first instinct is the Oseberg Cart but that's a 4-wheel job.
      http://abe.midco.net/vikingskald/Oseberg_cart/fullcart_files/cart_files/cart.jpg
      ... but you will notice how wide the hubs are for wheel stability.

      Flip through Karen Larsdatter's links until you find a few you like the
      design of and then we can talk construction specifics.
      http://www.larsdatter.com/wagons.htm

      P.S. I'm a house-builder when it comes to carts. My first siege engine
      had 4 wheels but no way to steer so it couldn't even turn around in the
      whole town green. My ballista base is a 2-wheel job but it requires 2
      people to play the part of the mule over rough terrain. Sticking to
      medieval proportions is probably best. :)

      Sean

      On 3/1/2010 12:05 AM, unknown wrote:
      > Thanks for all the suggestions on the cart. The cable spool ends were free, not a big deal if there not used. I would like the cart to be period looking as much as possible with my basic skills and knowledge. I hope to find cart plans, why re-invent the wheel...lol.
      >
      >
      > Thanks
      >
      > Theresa
      > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart<baronconal@...> wrote:
      >
      >> put some sort of support on the cart somewhere so that it
      >> can sit with the oven on it in a 'mostly level' manner without
      >> someone standing there holding it.
      >>
      >> I want a cart too..... and I'm probably gonna over engineer it.
      >>
      >> I'm willing to admit that up front.
      >> Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
      >>
      >> Aude Aliquid Dignum
      >> ' Dare Something Worthy'
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ________________________________
      >> From: "conradh@..."<conradh@...>
      >> To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      >> Sent: Sun, February 28, 2010 5:05:23 PM
      >> Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] New.. Intro~ Hi..Want to Make A 2-Wheel Cart For a Portable Oven
      >>
      >>
      >> On Sun, February 28, 2010 12:28 pm, Sean Powell wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >>> The first is to have a wide hub. I believe the complete blacksmith has
      >>> some recommendations for wheel hub length to diameter but on a 36 wheel I
      >>> would suggest at least 4" of bearing surface. I like black-iron pipe from
      >>> home depot as an axle. Very strong for it's weight. Cross drilling and
      >>> using a large washer plus cotter-pin is no more anachronistic then
      >>> wore-spool wheels and they can be removed for easy transport.
      >>>
      >> Wide hubs also have a strength advantage when wheels are strained and
      >> twisted by uneven ground. For a more cosmetic version of his suggestion,
      >> you could bore a blind hole into a round or squarish block of wood and
      >> have it masquerade as a traditional wooden axle-end. A wedge would hold
      >> it to the pipe inside (and also hold the wheel on). In other words, the
      >> block serves as the "washer" and the wedge replaces the cotter pin.
      >>
      >>>
      >>
      >>> Why a 2-wheel cart and not a 4-wheel wagon? 200lbs is burdensome to keep
      >>> balanced and unstable on it's own (without the donkey). You can add a
      >>> collapsing 3rd leg to support the handles level when not pushing it but
      >>> there is always the risk of it collapsing when you don't want it to. Your
      >>> basic red-ryder wagon framework is period and actually rather convenient.
      >>> You might be able to thicken the hub area and carefully
      >>> re-drill holes for the axles and mount them with either lag-bolts or
      >>> threaded rod and castle nuts. The last solution is what we did your our
      >>> trebuchet wheels. 16" diameter 1.5" thick and 2.25" length hubs on 3/4"
      >>> axles. Works nicely.
      >>>
      >> Or do what the owners of carts have done for thousands of years--learn to
      >> load in a balanced way. If your oven is going to be most of the load, how
      >> about sliding it in until the desired balance is achieved, (I would prefer
      >> about 20 pounds weight on the shafts, so that I _know_ which way it will
      >> want to tilt, but arrange it however you like) and then tack a cleat to
      >> the bed of the cart so the oven can't slip forward on a bump. The cleat
      >> defines how far you slide the oven in, so it loads right every time, and
      >> then a bit of rope can keep it from slipping back.
      >>
      >> The advantages of two-wheeled carts are economy, ease of construction and
      >> the ability to maneuver in less space. If you go the four-wheel route,
      >> you may discover that the wagon has a _very_ large turning circle unless
      >> you build a pivoting front axle assembly, and that makes the whole project
      >> considerably more complicated. Wheelwrights used to make jokes about
      >> wagons built by house carpenters, because they needed the whole of the
      >> village common just to turn around in....
      >>
      >> Free advice, and probably worth every penny. Good luck with your project,
      >> whichever choices you try.
      >>
      >> Ulfhedinn
      >>
      >>> Sean
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> On 2/28/2010 1:21 PM, unknown wrote:
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>> I am a cook more than a woodworker, but I want to make a 2 wheel cart
      >>>> to drag a portable oven around. Something small and very simple, but
      >>>> it needs to hold some weight. I have 3 sets of 36" round wood cable
      >>>> spool ends to make wheels. I was thinking of bolting 2 sets to make a
      >>>> 1½" wide wheel.
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> The best I can describe without 10,000 words is a donkey cart or a
      >>>> Mormon hand cart with out spokes (which would be more complex).
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> I am stuck at the axle part. Getting the wheel to go round without
      >>>> wobbling or dumping a 200 pound oven to the ground, or taking up the
      >>>> entire trailer.
      >>>>
      >>>> I have made a couple break down thrones and a simple box.
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Does anyone have plans even I can follow?
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> HELP
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Theresa
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
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      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>
      >>
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