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11636Re: [MedievalSawdust] Are Holdfasts period? (i.e. pre-17th century?)

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  • AlbionWood
    Jun 6, 2009
      >
      > is there a
      > period method of securing work to a bench to completely immobilize it
      > for working from the top side while mortising, etc, that I'm missing?
      >

      Yes, apparently. For carving, I hold the work with bench dogs and
      wedges. This is fast, easy, and works very well if the angle of the
      wedges is just right. My bench has round holes, and I use dogs with
      square heads, so they rotate to match the angle of the wedges. Spacer
      strips accommodate different widths of material. Nothing projecting
      above the surface of the work to get in the way, either. Try it, you'll
      like it!

      As for holdfasts - I'll look through some photos and see if there's any
      indication of them before the end of the 16th c. There are some good
      archaeological finds of woodworking tools; if holdfasts were in common
      use, they should appear in those collections.

      Gary Halstead should be consulted - he's done a great deal of research
      on medieval/renaissance woodworking tools, and wrote the CA pamphlet on
      the subject (which see.)

      Cheers,
      Tim



      Alex Haugland wrote:
      > So, I've been attempting to research and document tools and practices of
      > medieval and renaissance woodworking and I've run into a little bit of a
      > question... Does anyone know definitively if holdfasts (i.e. the metal
      > upside-down J-shaped things used with a mallet and holes in the
      > workbench to secure work) were a known technology before the 17th
      > century? Ideally, for this project, I want some solid written or visual
      > evidence, if anyone has seen any. I do have documentation to 1678, from
      > Joseph Moxon's Mechanick Exercises (The Art of Joinery) but I've yet to
      > solidly find anything before that point... Failing that, is there a
      > period method of securing work to a bench to completely immobilize it
      > for working from the top side while mortising, etc, that I'm missing?
      >
      > --Alysaundre Weldon d'Ath
      > Barony of Adiantum, An Tir
      >
      >
      >
      >
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