Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

11114Re: Guidance

Expand Messages
  • Jeff Johnson
    Feb 26, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Ah. I misunderstood.

      Tim had good suggestions, but some of the woods he suggests may be
      difficult to work. Walnut is a tad heavy for something for your lap,
      and American walnut is also different from European species. Linden is
      a tad soft. Beech would work, (and is light colored like the tapestry)
      but might be harder to obtain. Oak should be quartersaw to prevent
      warping, and is likewise heavy for a lap device. Ash would be a good
      choice for this application in my book. It's strong, light in weight
      and color, not the easiest to work, but durable. I'd stay clear of
      pine, no matter how inexpensive. It'll break on you.

      For the joints, dovetailing is difficult for the beginner, so I'd
      suggest rabbet joints at the corner and wooden pegs.

      Overall, though, I'd suggest starting with an easier project.

      Jeff

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Barbara Tenbroek
      <tenbroek2008@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thank you. I had seen the loom and really thought it was a good
      price, but since I want to do this as an A&S project I need to make it
      myself.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Jeff Johnson <jljonsn9663@...>
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 7:47:21 PM
      > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Guidance
      >
      >
      > If you have little woodworking experience, this may be a difficult
      > project. Might I suggest you take a look at this page:
      >
      > http://www.spanishp eacock.com/ looms.htm
      >
      > Jeff
      >
      > --- In medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com, Barbara Tenbroek
      > <tenbroek2008@ ...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Wow he knows more about my source than I do! Thanks.
      > > Thanks for the information and wood help. I have added another two
      > pictures for clarification of what I am planing on creating.
      > >
      > >
      > > Cibella
      > >
      > >
      > > ____________ _________ _________ __
      > > From: AlbionWood <albionwood@ ...>
      > > To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
      > > Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2009 1:28:35 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Guidance
      > >
      > >
      > > The tapestry is early-to mid-16th century North European (probably
      > > Netherlandish or French). So dovetails aren't out of the question
      for
      > > box-corner joinery, in fact they would be quite appropriate. I don't
      > > know of any surviving boxlooms, but have seen a fair number of small
      > > coffers and larger chests from this period in European museums.
      > Many of
      > > them are dovetail-joined. Some are butted and nailed, or treenailed
      > > (wooden nails); I've never seen one that was just glued. Quite
      often,
      > > even with dovetail joinery, the corners are reinforced with metal
      > > brackets, nailed or riveted in place. I have a number of photos of
      > > these if you're interested; a few are in the folder "Dovetails" in
      the
      > > Photos section for this Group.
      > >
      > > Many types of wood were used for these coffers. Oak, beech, and
      walnut
      > > are common; linden was also used for carved coffers. I can get some
      > > documentary references later if you need them. You'll want
      quartersawn
      > > wood if you can get it, to reduce warping.
      > >
      > > A simple box with butted and treenailed joints is a pretty good
      project
      > > for a beginning woodworker. Adding the metal brackets will
      > > significantly increase durability, but also complexity; you'll
      want to
      > > fabricate your own brackets.
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > > Tim
      > >
      > > > I have posted a picture of a tapestry in a album titled Cibella.
      > > > I am a weaver and would like to recreate the boxloom on the lap
      of the
      > > > woman in the left of the picture. My skills and knowledge in wood
      > > > working are very limited (read NONE).
      > > >
      > > > Could any of you provide me with the type of wood that would
      have been
      > > > used in period and a source for documentation?
      > > >
      > > > I am also unsure of the type of joins this type of item would have.
      > > > >From the little I have read it seems that nails, dovetails or
      simple
      > > > butted ends with glue were used during this time frame.
      > > >
      > > > I would like to enter this as an A&S entry so documentation is very
      > > > important. I also plan to use this loom to weave on so
      durability as
      > > > well as weight are something I need to consider.
      > > >
      > > > Thank you in advance for your help
      > > >
      > > > Cibella Monmouth
      > > > mka Barbara tenBroek
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ------------ --------- --------- ------
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Show all 11 messages in this topic