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Re: Dutch Urban Archaeology exhibition: some pics

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  • Bertus Brokamp
    I think the three long iron pointy pieces of iron in http://www.bertbrok.dds.nl/rmo-leather/PC150052.JPG are supossed to be the awls. I went looking on the
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 22, 2004
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      I think the three long iron pointy pieces of iron in
      http://www.bertbrok.dds.nl/rmo-leather/PC150052.JPG
      are supossed to be the awls.
      I went looking on the webspace of the Dordrecht Archeoligal Centre and
      found this:
      http://cms.dordrecht.nl/dordt?nav=swjjEsHaKnPTotbBrtbBjBIHqB

      The 'deskundige' (expert), which is the community archeologist Johan
      Hendriks, says this (translated by me):

      Our object is of natural stone. One side is flat with round sides, the
      other side has two small holes on both sides of a small flat surface
      with in front of that nine recesses. The two holes are indeed there to
      fasten a counter-mould to. The measurements are 13,5 cm length, 7 cm
      width and 2,5 cm height.
      Contradictory to what the gentleman Verboom (owner of a tool store)
      thinks the ridges are not there to give give shape/structure/texture
      to another material. They are nine independent ridges that have
      nothing to do with each other. Well, other than the fact that the same
      objects come out of them. If we look closely at the ridges then it
      becomes clear that they really are some V-shaped recesses. If this was
      the case with the counter-mould (which we assume) then they will
      produce longitudinal rhomboidal cavities which can be filled from one
      side. With liquid metal or some such. Possibly liquid iron. Luckily
      for us we found at our dig/research (1997) on the Statenplein (=
      Statensquare), because this is where it originates from, a number of
      these small iron rhomboidal rods. These are leatherneedles or awls,
      which were used by leather workers to prick holes in leather. Round
      holes are useless because the leather will then close again. So it is
      a mould to cast nine awls per time with. From the archeological
      context it can be dated to the 14th c.

      So there's you answer.
      I think they are a bit too large to be awls but who am I ;)

      By the way, there are some more interesting things on that website of
      what they excavated in Dordrecht.
      What do you think of this one for example:
      http://cms.dordrecht.nl/dordt?nav=joxeIsHaKnPTotbBrtbBjBIHA

      Conservator/restorator Mirjam van Oeveren (translated by me):
      The shoe from the dig at the Head of the Winestreet shows a unique
      painting. Often these kind of paintings are, regrettably, less visible
      when the conservation measures have been applied. In the phase prior
      to the conserving of archeological leather the leather is still
      submerged in water. Only in this phase are the red en golden yellow
      lines, dots and the french lillies of the shoe visible. Of course the
      fragment was extensively photographed during this 'wet' phase. Next to
      the painting also a impressed pattern of rhomboids was applied as
      decoration. The diagonally crossing lines only became visible in the
      dry phase.

      It is rare to find painted objects in the ground, even more so when
      the colours of the paint are still really present. Especially red
      (ironoxide) is a much used colour that lasts longest. In the
      Netherlands a total of five painted shoes where found, of which four
      in Dordrecht and one in Huissen. These shoes all date from the 14th c.

      To give an impression of the model and the applied decoration a
      reconstruction from new leather was made by leatherspecialist Olaf
      Goubitz. After the reconstruction was sewn it became clear why the
      leather of the original had split above the upper foot. Even though it
      has been made of supple goat leather and even with the laces untied
      the opening of the shoe appears to be much too narrow. The splitting /
      tearing of the leather became unavoidable when putting on the shoe.


      For more finds look here:
      http://cms.dordrecht.nl/dordt?nav=ppqiEsHaKnPTotbBrtbBjBIH


      Bertus



      --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Carlson"
      <marccarlson20@h...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Bertus Brokamp"
      > <bertbrok@d...> wrote:
      >
      > > 40
      > > Knife for cutting leather
      > > P: Dordrecht, Statenplein
      > > D: 14th c.
      > >
      > > 41
      > > Three awls
      > > P: Dordrecht, Statenplein
      > > D: 14th c.
      > > Awls are meant to make holes in leather.
      >
      > I saw the knife - beautiful; I didn't see any awls though. Did you
      > get pictures of them?
      >
      > Marc
    • Marc Carlson
      ... I was afraid you might say that :) ... Thank you for the translation (if forced to i can translate most languges using Roman characters, but I d rather not
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 22, 2004
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        --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Bertus Brokamp"
        <bertbrok@d...> wrote:
        > I think the three long iron pointy pieces of iron in
        > http://www.bertbrok.dds.nl/rmo-leather/PC150052.JPG
        > are supossed to be the awls.

        I was afraid you might say that :)

        > ...Statensquare), because this is where it originates from, a number
        > of these small iron rhomboidal rods. These are leatherneedles or
        > awls, which were used by leather workers to prick holes in leather.
        > Round holes are useless because the leather will then close again.
        > So it is a mould to cast nine awls per time with. From the
        > archeological context it can be dated to the 14th c.
        > So there's you answer.
        > I think they are a bit too large to be awls but who am I ;)

        Thank you for the translation (if forced to i can translate most
        languges using Roman characters, but I'd rather not if I don't have
        to). Mmm, large... maybe. They might be awl blades - although I
        have some other questions for the expert before I'd just dive in and
        say they are awl blades (like are there local 14th century examples of
        leather with a triangular holes? (And who told him that a round awl
        blade is useless? 'cause they wrong).

        Don't ever be reluctant to question interpretations. Skepticism is a
        good thing. It's only unwillingness to be convinced that is a problem :)

        > By the way, there are some more interesting things on that website
        > of what they excavated in Dordrecht.
        > What do you think of this one for example:
        > http://cms.dordrecht.nl/dordt?nav=joxeIsHaKnPTotbBrtbBjBIHA

        Very pretty. The narrowness might be a problem, but judging from the
        fact that it looks like we're missing a good sized wedge out of the
        one side, I'm not positive (copy the picture, cut it out and try
        taping the side seams together and you'll see what I mean. The bend
        to the left in the shoe may be there, or it may be missing even more
        of the side, but at the very least there is a roughly triangular piece
        from the upper half of the side seam to the vamp throat that isn't
        there. I'll need to take a look at Goubitz's stuff since I think this
        one may be depicted there (or it's one that looks something like it).

        Marc
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