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Weird question

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  • Marc Carlson
    Ok, we all buy our leathar from whomever (Leather Factory, etc.) and take it home. Does anyone acutally prepare their leather, curry it and let it cure for a
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
      Ok, we all buy our leathar from whomever (Leather Factory, etc.) and
      take it home. Does anyone acutally prepare their leather, curry it
      and let it cure for a while, or whatever BEFORE they use it?

      Marc
    • Leather Work
      Actually never considered that it would have to cure . IF I had the space and $$$ I would purchase in larger quantities, store flat and covered. But I dont
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
        Actually never considered that it would have to 'cure'.  IF I had the space and $$$ I would purchase in larger quantities, store flat and covered.  But I dont build significant inventories.
         
        McPhereson Leather in Seattle has some bark tanned leather that certainly has a different feel to it than veg tanned.  Kinda like it has a bit more tanning oil in it than the usual veg tanned I have gotten.
         
        I did get a roll of 12 oz from a friend who got it from a friend.. etc etc.  It seems when I asked about it that it was originally purchased in the late 50s.  That chunk is extremely difficult to work with.  So much firmer and dense than todays 12 oz leathers available.  Without spending cazillion bucks for the best leather.  Thankfully I dont work in 12 oz very often.  When I do it does have to be prepped.  I will give it a bit of tooling solution a couple days ahead of time.  Tanning oil, glycerin, and water mixture.  When relatively dry it cuts and works much better.
         
        Charles

        Marc Carlson <marccarlson20@...> wrote:
        Ok, we all buy our leathar from whomever (Leather Factory, etc.) and
        take it home.  Does anyone acutally prepare their leather, curry it
        and let it cure for a while, or whatever BEFORE they use it?

        Marc



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      • Alasdair Muckart
        ... Curry it? -- Al.
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
          On Sat, 2003-12-20 at 08:55, Marc Carlson wrote:
          > Ok, we all buy our leathar from whomever (Leather Factory, etc.) and
          > take it home. Does anyone acutally prepare their leather, curry it
          > and let it cure for a while, or whatever BEFORE they use it?

          Curry it?

          --
          Al.
        • Marc Carlson
          ... The reason I was asking about the curing it thing, was that since most of the recipes I ve sen lately for currying stuff - at least the English recipes
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
            --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Leather Work
            <lthrwrk2000@y...> wrote:
            > Actually never considered that it would have to 'cure'. IF I had
            >the space and $$$ I would purchase in larger quantities, store flat
            >and covered. But I dont build significant inventories.

            The reason I was asking about the curing it thing, was that since most
            of the recipes I've sen lately for "currying" stuff - at least the
            English recipes have all got cod oil as a component, and when that
            starts to oxidise it gets that fishy smell, but that goes away after a
            week or so leaving only a faintly sweet "fish" smell. of course while
            it's oxidising it's soaking into the leather and chemically altering
            it a little more as well.

            > McPhereson Leather in Seattle has some bark tanned leather that
            >certainly has a different feel to it than veg tanned. Kinda like it
            >has a bit more tanning oil in it than the usual veg tanned I have
            >gotten.

            Hmm. Then they may be currying the leather or getting it curried from
            the tanner. The small sample I got from Muir and McDonald had been
            curried as well. The stuff I get from say, Tandy, has not been.

            > I did get a roll of 12 oz from a friend who got it from a friend..
            >etc etc. It seems when I asked about it that it was originally
            >purchased in the late 50s. That chunk is extremely difficult to work
            >with.

            Cut a small swatch, soak it in water for about 10 minutes and see what
            it does :)

            >dont work in 12 oz very often. When I do it does have to be prepped.
            >I will give it a bit of tooling solution a couple days ahead of
            time. >Tanning oil, glycerin, and water mixture. When relatively dry
            it >cuts and works much better.

            Okie dokie.

            Marc
          • Marc Carlson
            ... Curry, you know, stuffing the hide with dubbin to loosen it... :) Sorry, couldn t resist :) Simply, oiling up the leather with some form of grease or
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
              --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Alasdair Muckart
              <silver@w...> wrote:
              >> ...and let it cure for a while, or whatever BEFORE they use it?
              > Curry it?

              Curry, you know, stuffing the hide with dubbin to loosen it... :)

              Sorry, couldn't resist :)

              Simply, oiling up the leather with some form of grease or other to
              make it stronger or easier to use.

              Marc
            • Phlip
              Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu... ... Been wondering that myself. I ve curried many a hide, but always with the hair still on and the animal still living in it
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
                Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu...

                >
                > Curry it?
                >
                > --
                > Al.

                Been wondering that myself. I've curried many a hide, but always with the
                hair still on and the animal still living in it ;-)

                Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry" in this context, and
                where did you get this usage?

                Saint Phlip,
                CoDoLDS

                "When in doubt, heat it up and hit it with a hammer."
                Blacksmith's credo.

                If it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it is probably not a
                cat.

                Never a horse that cain't be rode,
                And never a rider who cain't be throwed....
              • i_ mungo
                You know.. curry, maybe a little black pepper, some paprika.. depends on your tastes.. ;) ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo!
                Message 7 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
                  You know.. curry, maybe a little black pepper, some
                  paprika.. depends on your tastes..

                  ;)

                  --- Phlip <phlip@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu...
                  >
                  > >
                  > > Curry it?
                  > >
                  > > --
                  > > Al.
                  >
                  > Been wondering that myself. I've curried many a
                  > hide, but always with the
                  > hair still on and the animal still living in it ;-)
                  >
                  > Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry"
                  > in this context, and
                  > where did you get this usage?
                  >
                  > Saint Phlip,
                  > CoDoLDS
                  >
                  > "When in doubt, heat it up and hit it with a
                  > hammer."
                  > Blacksmith's credo.
                  >
                  > If it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it
                  > is probably not a
                  > cat.
                  >
                  > Never a horse that cain't be rode,
                  > And never a rider who cain't be throwed....
                  >
                  >
                  >


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                • Marc Carlson
                  ... Well, let s see... The entire currier s tool section of Salaman s Dictionary of Leatherworking tools. http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm The
                  Message 8 of 15 , Dec 19, 2003
                    --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Phlip" <phlip@9...> wrote:
                    > Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry" in this context,
                    > and where did you get this usage?

                    Well, let's see...
                    The entire currier's tool section of Salaman's Dictionary of
                    Leatherworking tools.
                    http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm
                    The OED (n1, and v1.2)

                    Still looking for sources - you'll have to excuse me, but this is
                    actually a term I hadn't considered that leatherworkers wouldn't know.
                    That's not meant to be insulting or belittling or anything - I'm just
                    taken by surprise is all. Since it's not a current occupation, I can
                    see why people wouldn't know it, but as to where I learned it - I
                    learned it growing up in Colorado in the 60s (my family had horses, so
                    I learned both definitions).

                    Marc
                  • LDMundy
                    Perhaps this is a case of Curry Flavel for which there may be no cure (hint) Ld Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu... ... Been wondering that myself. I ve curried
                    Message 9 of 15 , Dec 20, 2003
                      Perhaps this is a case of Curry Flavel for which there may be no cure (hint)
                      Ld

                      Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu...

                      >
                      > Curry it?
                      >
                      > --
                      > Al.

                      Been wondering that myself. I've curried many a hide, but always with the
                      hair still on and the animal still living in it ;-)

                      Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry" in this context, and
                      where did you get this usage?

                      Saint Phlip,
                      CoDoLDS

                    • Ron Charlotte
                      ... The most I ve ever done is a wipe down with a very dilute glycerine solution, and that was with some shoulders that I got really cheap, and discovered that
                      Message 10 of 15 , Dec 20, 2003
                        At 07:55 PM 12/19/03 +0000, Marc wrote:
                        Ok, we all buy our leathar from whomever (Leather Factory, etc.) and
                        take it home.  Does anyone acutally prepare their leather, curry it
                        and let it cure for a while, or whatever BEFORE they use it?

                        The most I've ever done is a wipe down with a very dilute glycerine solution, and that was with some shoulders that I got really cheap, and discovered that they were so dry that any bend would crack on the grain side.

                                 Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                                 ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

                      • Ron Charlotte
                        ... Currying of leather was often a separate trade from tanning, especially prior to the modern era. The leather went from the tanner to the currier as a
                        Message 11 of 15 , Dec 20, 2003
                          At 03:25 AM 12/20/03 +0000, Marc wrote:
                          --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Phlip" <phlip@9...> wrote:
                          > Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry" in this context,
                          > and where did you get this usage?

                          Well, let's see...
                                The entire currier's tool section of Salaman's Dictionary of
                          Leatherworking tools.
                                http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm
                                The OED  (n1, and v1.2)

                          Still looking for sources - you'll have to excuse me, but this is
                          actually a term I hadn't considered that leatherworkers wouldn't know.
                          That's not meant to be insulting or belittling or anything - I'm just
                          taken by surprise is all.  Since it's not a current occupation, I can
                          see why people wouldn't know it, but as to where I learned it - I
                          learned it growing up in Colorado in the 60s (my family had horses, so
                          I learned both definitions).

                          Currying of leather was often a separate trade from tanning, especially prior to the modern era.  The leather went from the tanner to the currier as a separate treatment stage.  It's a pretty old term.

                                   Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                                   ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

                        • i_ mungo
                          I still think it has to involve paprika and pepper in there someplace.. ... __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New Yahoo! Photos - easier
                          Message 12 of 15 , Dec 21, 2003
                            I still think it has to involve paprika and pepper in
                            there someplace..

                            --- Ron Charlotte <ronch2@...> wrote:
                            > At 03:25 AM 12/20/03 +0000, Marc wrote:
                            > >--- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Phlip"
                            > <phlip@9...> wrote:
                            > > > Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of
                            > "curry" in this context,
                            > > > and where did you get this usage?
                            > >
                            > >Well, let's see...
                            > > The entire currier's tool section of
                            > Salaman's Dictionary of
                            > >Leatherworking tools.
                            > >
                            >
                            ><http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm>http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm
                            > > The OED (n1, and v1.2)
                            > >
                            > >Still looking for sources - you'll have to excuse
                            > me, but this is
                            > >actually a term I hadn't considered that
                            > leatherworkers wouldn't know.
                            > >That's not meant to be insulting or belittling or
                            > anything - I'm just
                            > >taken by surprise is all. Since it's not a current
                            > occupation, I can
                            > >see why people wouldn't know it, but as to where I
                            > learned it - I
                            > >learned it growing up in Colorado in the 60s (my
                            > family had horses, so
                            > >I learned both definitions).
                            >
                            > Currying of leather was often a separate trade from
                            > tanning, especially
                            > prior to the modern era. The leather went from the
                            > tanner to the currier
                            > as a separate treatment stage. It's a pretty old
                            > term.
                            >
                            >
                            > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                            > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...


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                          • Argent Company Listbox
                            Ok here is a stupid question. I will be the first to admit that Leather is not my strong craft. But wouldn t the currying as decribed below cause problems
                            Message 13 of 15 , Dec 26, 2003
                              RE: [medieval-leather] Re: Weird question

                               Ok here is a stupid question. I will be the first to admit that Leather is not my strong craft.  But wouldn't the currying as decribed below cause problems with the dyeing of the leather later?  I have always tried not to do any oiling before the dyeing step, am I doing something wrong?

                              Doug

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Marc Carlson
                              To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: 12/19/03 10:25 PM
                              Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Weird question

                              --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Phlip" <phlip@9...> wrote:
                              > Educate uf, guys, what's your definition of "curry" in this context,
                              > and where did you get this usage?

                              Well, let's see...
                                      The entire currier's tool section of Salaman's Dictionary of
                              Leatherworking tools.
                                      http://www.maybole.org/home/pettit/currier.htm
                                      The OED  (n1, and v1.2)

                              Still looking for sources - you'll have to excuse me, but this is
                              actually a term I hadn't considered that leatherworkers wouldn't know.
                               That's not meant to be insulting or belittling or anything - I'm just
                              taken by surprise is all.  Since it's not a current occupation, I can
                              see why people wouldn't know it, but as to where I learned it - I
                              learned it growing up in Colorado in the 60s (my family had horses, so
                              I learned both definitions).

                              Marc




                               

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                            • Ron Charlotte
                              ... The kind of currying that s being discussed is normally the final step of the post tanning process, to replenish oils that tanning and tawing deplete.
                              Message 14 of 15 , Dec 26, 2003
                                At 03:28 PM 12/26/03 -0500, Doug wrote:

                                 Ok here is a stupid question. I will be the first to admit that Leather is not my strong craft.  But wouldn't the currying as decribed below cause problems with the dyeing of the leather later?  I have always tried not to do any oiling before the dyeing step, am I doing something wrong?

                                The kind of currying that's being discussed is normally the final step of the post tanning process, to replenish oils that tanning and tawing deplete.  Bear in mind, that modern leather is usually done so in a rotating drum type process, and the leather is given a lot of time to rest and absorb before you ever handle it (and it's a relatively small amount of oil).  Medievally, the dying process frequently (usually to all indications) was either part of the tan/taw process, or was the immediate next step, currying would come after dye, generally (remember, they tended to dye whole hides/skins).

                                         Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                                         ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

                              • cmiddleton2002
                                English Medieval Industries describes Currying as occuring between the Tanning/Tawing stage and the actiual use of the leather. The Currier would stretch the
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jan 3 3:26 AM
                                  English Medieval Industries describes Currying as occuring between
                                  the Tanning/Tawing stage and the actiual use of the leather. The
                                  Currier would stretch the leather and even out its thickness. He
                                  would also oil and prepare it for use.

                                  Colin

                                  --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Ron Charlotte <ronch2@b...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > At 03:28 PM 12/26/03 -0500, Doug wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > Ok here is a stupid question. I will be the first to admit that
                                  Leather
                                  > > is not my strong craft. But wouldn't the currying as decribed
                                  below
                                  > > cause problems with the dyeing of the leather later? I have
                                  always tried
                                  > > not to do any oiling before the dyeing step, am I doing something
                                  wrong?
                                  >
                                  > The kind of currying that's being discussed is normally the final
                                  step of
                                  > the post tanning process, to replenish oils that tanning and tawing
                                  > deplete. Bear in mind, that modern leather is usually done so in a
                                  > rotating drum type process, and the leather is given a lot of time
                                  to rest
                                  > and absorb before you ever handle it (and it's a relatively small
                                  amount of
                                  > oil). Medievally, the dying process frequently (usually to all
                                  > indications) was either part of the tan/taw process, or was the
                                  immediate
                                  > next step, currying would come after dye, generally (remember, they
                                  tended
                                  > to dye whole hides/skins).
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                                  > ronch2@b... OR afn03234@a...
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