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Saddle stich.

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  • Chris Nickel
    Can anyone tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of the leather through the same hole) is a period stich? Do we have any documentation of when it
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 29, 2003
      Can anyone tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of
      the leather through the same hole) is a period stich? Do we have any
      documentation of when it was first used? I am putting together a
      class on how to make belt pouches for SCA folks and am trying to
      keep it accurate.
      Thanks
      -Chris
    • i_ mungo
      Chris, I am nooo expert, by any stretch of the imagination, but while researching shoe making from the 15th to the 18th century, I found several references to
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 29, 2003
        Chris,
        I am nooo expert, by any stretch of the imagination,
        but while researching shoe making from the 15th to the
        18th century, I found several references to this
        method of stitching, in shoes and other leather items
        like quivers for archery as well. You might get in
        touch with the SCA member who wrote this article on
        scabbard making.. He may be able to point you at some
        historically accurate sources of information.
        http://www.rencentral.com/jul_aug_vol1/cordwainer.shtml

        Chris Nickel <cnickel1@...> wrote:Can anyone
        tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of

        the leather through the same hole) is a period stich?
        Do we have any
        documentation of when it was first used? I am putting
        together a
        class on how to make belt pouches for SCA folks and am
        trying to
        keep it accurate.
        Thanks
        -Chris


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      • Marc Carlson
        ... Vased on the extant shoe and scabbard finds, and how neat the seams are, I d have to say that yes, it s a medieval stitch. Moreover they were apparently
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 29, 2003
          --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "Chris Nickel"
          <cnickel1@a...> wrote:
          > Can anyone tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of
          > the leather through the same hole) is a period stich? Do we have any
          > documentation of when it was first used? I am putting together a
          > class on how to make belt pouches for SCA folks and am trying to
          > keep it accurate.

          Vased on the extant shoe and scabbard finds, and how neat the seams
          are, I'd have to say that yes, it's a medieval stitch. Moreover they
          were apparently using it in Roman shoemaking, and while I don't hav
          ethe source in front of me, I think the stitches on the Egyptian shoes
          show that seam neatness that you just don't get with making tight
          stitches, doubling up a single running stitch. In fact the antiquity
          of its use with shoemakers may be why it's more traditionally known as
          "shoemaker stitch" :)

          (_Knives and Scabbards_ and _Shoes and Pattens_ will get you back into
          the Middle Ages at the least).

          Marc
        • Schaz
          I m not a scadian, I m a metal weapons fighter and yes saddle stitch is period. Some of our groups here in australia, for assessment have a 2 meter rule (well
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 29, 2003
            I'm not a scadian, I'm a metal weapons fighter and yes saddle stitch is
            period. Some of our groups here in australia, for assessment have a 2 meter
            rule (well all have the 2 meter rule just some take it to a 30cm rule!) and
            if you are very *very* lucky you can get away with machine stitching because
            I've seen hand-done saddle stitch and machine stitching and can't tell the
            difference.

            But to answer your question yes it is period. You should look in one of the
            history of costuming books to check.

            Cheers
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Chris Nickel" <cnickel1@...>
            To: <medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, August 29, 2003 10:27 PM
            Subject: [medieval-leather] Saddle stich.


            > Can anyone tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of
            > the leather through the same hole) is a period stich? Do we have any
            > documentation of when it was first used? I am putting together a
            > class on how to make belt pouches for SCA folks and am trying to
            > keep it accurate.
            > Thanks
            > -Chris
          • Ron Charlotte
            ... According to Waterer, in _Leather Craftsmanship_, there is a 2nd Century Roman tombstone depicting the saddle stitching process. It predates that from
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 1, 2003
              At 12:27 PM 8/29/2003 +0000, Chris wrote:
              Can anyone tell me if the saddle stich,(thread from both sides of
              the leather through the same hole) is a period stich? Do we have any
              documentation of when it was first used? I am putting together a
              class on how to make belt pouches for SCA folks and am trying to
              keep it accurate.

              According to Waterer, in _Leather Craftsmanship_, there is a 2nd Century Roman tombstone depicting the saddle stitching process.  It predates that from surviving articles to ancient Egypt, and (I think) the "Iceman's" era.  Truth be told, the use of thongs for assembly, at all, except closures (like the Irish book bags) only became common in the modern era (unless you go way back, not counting something a person might whip together for short term use).

                       Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                       ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

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