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RE: [medieval-leather] Re: Suggestion needed....

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  • Michael Sheldon
    Alum-tawing is a type of tanning/curing of leather. Rawhide leather is soaked in vats of alum salts. In other words, you buy it. :) Michael J. Sheldon
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 31, 2002
      Alum-tawing is a type of tanning/curing of leather. Rawhide leather is
      soaked in vats of alum salts.

      In other words, you buy it. :)

      Michael J. Sheldon
      http://www.whitehat.com
      PGP key available on request

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Phlip [mailto:phlip@...]
      > Sent: Thursday, October 31, 2002 11:20 AM
      > To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Suggestion needed....
      >
      >
      > > I would imagine that in period, alum-tawed leather was used for white
      > > leather.
      > >
      > > Michael J. Sheldon
      >
      > OK. Do you happen to know the technique? I've only used alum for adding to
      > my beeswax/parafin mix for drinking jacks.
      >
      > Phlip
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • Jonathan Hershey
      If this poor guy is still dyed, I have removed a number of substances from my hands using baby oil and salt - I just pour some of each in my hands and scrub
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 1, 2002
        If this poor guy is still dyed, I have removed a number of substances
        from my hands using baby oil and salt - I just pour some of each in my
        hands and scrub them hard -- there doesn't seem to be a specific ratio of
        either. I then wash with soap and water. This has worked when commercial
        mechanics hand cleaners have not.
        Jon


        > > Folks, I need your help.
        >
        > I have a friend who manages to creatively do himself in on a regular
        > basis, and he's done it again. He has managed to get the better part
        > of a bottle of leather dye all over his hands, and he's due to be
        > Laurelled in about a week and a half. Gloves won't do, and painting
        > the rest of himself green likely won't help either. Anybody got any
        > good ideas for removing leather dye (not sure whether it's oil or
        > spirit base) from one's anatomy- preferably while leaving the skin on?
        >
        > Considering this guy's proclivities (stabbed himself in the nose with
        > a needle, tried to castrate himself sewing together a tent, among
        > other things) do we have any suggestions for reasonably non-toxic,
        > non-flammable dye removal? I suggested cold cream, but as I said, I'm
        > not quite sure what type of dye he decorated himself with.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Phlip
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >


        --
        1
      • rmhowe
        ... Generally, I use Gojo with pumice and the little surgeon s scrub brush that comes on the side of the bottle it comes in. Prior to, or after that I may use
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 12, 2002
          Jonathan Hershey wrote:
          >
          > If this poor guy is still dyed, I have removed a number of substances
          > from my hands using baby oil and salt - I just pour some of each in my
          > hands and scrub them hard -- there doesn't seem to be a specific ratio of
          > either. I then wash with soap and water. This has worked when commercial
          > mechanics hand cleaners have not.
          > Jon

          Generally, I use Gojo with pumice and the little surgeon's scrub
          brush that comes on the side of the bottle it comes in.

          Prior to, or after that I may use lacquer thinner. I'm an old
          cabinetmaker and there is very little it won't remove to some
          degree. One step up would be acetone. The problem with these
          solvents is they also take all the oil out of your hands.
          The hardest places I've found to get stain/dye out of is
          of course the areas on every side of the nails.

          There are some hand cremes that you can put on prior to working
          with some things like old car grease. (Whenever I want to apply
          a really aged look to something I've found oily road soot on
          an engine to be ideal). These cremes form a barrier in the skin
          pores before the mess gets in. Thankfully I am not a mechanic,
          nor do my hands have those really deep cracks with black in
          them. I have some downstairs I bought at Northern Tools, just
          haven't had a suitable opportunity to use it. I seem to recall
          an Ann Landers column that suggested hand creme as a preventative
          to an embarassed woman to suggest to her suitor/husband.

          My most recent horrible attack had to do with some Max Black
          or Black Max metal blackener used on some etched silver.
          You then sand off/buff the high spots carefully. That particular
          little joy juice left areas of both hands medium s**t brown for
          a week. I'm pretty sure riogrande.com sells it. I was using it
          in conjunction with a photographic/asphaltum etching class at the
          time. After it dried I sanded it off on the high spots, somehow
          that transferred the stuff to my hands and it reacted of course.

          This may have been someway chemically similar to the Yankee spy
          who used silver nitrate to infiltrate Confederate fortifications
          as a negro laborer during our Civil War. Didn't fool the blacks
          reportedly but nobody talked either. Touched it up repeatedly
          with applications from a silver nitrate bottle. I don't think
          his entire hide was covered but one might wonder how he handled
          the call of nature. Or he carried a pair of long-handled mirrors
          and a very large bent dauber.

          You could also try a counter dye I suppose for a more attractive
          color. Walnut or oak and possibly ash contain tannic acid. Handling
          that enough over part of a day will turn your hands light purple for
          about three days or so. How that would overlay brown I have no idea.

          Magnus Maximus

          > > > Folks, I need your help.
          > >
          > > I have a friend who manages to creatively do himself in on a regular
          > > basis, and he's done it again. He has managed to get the better part
          > > of a bottle of leather dye all over his hands, and he's due to be
          > > Laurelled in about a week and a half. Gloves won't do, and painting
          > > the rest of himself green likely won't help either. Anybody got any
          > > good ideas for removing leather dye (not sure whether it's oil or
          > > spirit base) from one's anatomy- preferably while leaving the skin on?
          > >
          > > Considering this guy's proclivities (stabbed himself in the nose with
          > > a needle, tried to castrate himself sewing together a tent, among
          > > other things) do we have any suggestions for reasonably non-toxic,
          > > non-flammable dye removal? I suggested cold cream, but as I said, I'm
          > > not quite sure what type of dye he decorated himself with.
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > >
          > > Phlip
        • cptkay2001
          Overdye with blue and call it woad? suggest he wear latex gloves next time, or just go with the flow, it illustrates HE is indeed the laurel (good color
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 12, 2002
            Overdye with blue and call it woad?
            suggest he wear latex gloves next time, or just go with the flow, it
            illustrates HE is indeed the laurel (good color choice) and that
            he does do hos own work!
          • Alan Andrist
            I suppose you are right that it shows he does his own work. I remember Tandy used to sell hides with lots of scars and great ugly brands on them. When I asked
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 12, 2002
              I suppose you are right that it shows he does his own work. I remember Tandy
              used to sell hides with lots of scars and great ugly brands on them. When I
              asked why the price was the same as the clean leather, the store manager
              told me, "Those marks are your guarantee of genuine leather." To date I've
              not found a use ugly brands or accidentally leather-dyed hands. Acetone
              works about a well as anything, then put hand cream on ASAP.

              This thread seems to bring up a common experience for most of us. By the
              way, does the gentleman with the odd skin tone still need our advise?

              Alan Andrist.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: cptkay2001 [mailto:cptkay@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, November 12, 2002 3:28 PM
              To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Suggestion needed....


              Overdye with blue and call it woad?
              suggest he wear latex gloves next time, or just go with the flow, it
              illustrates HE is indeed the laurel (good color choice) and that
              he does do hos own work!





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            • Phlip
              Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu... ... Tandy ... I ... No, he got safely Laurelled last weekend, and the dye that was left in the cuticles after he tried various
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 12, 2002
                Ene bichizh ogsen baina shuu...

                > I suppose you are right that it shows he does his own work. I remember
                Tandy
                > used to sell hides with lots of scars and great ugly brands on them. When
                I
                > asked why the price was the same as the clean leather, the store manager
                > told me, "Those marks are your guarantee of genuine leather." To date I've
                > not found a use ugly brands or accidentally leather-dyed hands. Acetone
                > works about a well as anything, then put hand cream on ASAP.
                >
                > This thread seems to bring up a common experience for most of us. By the
                > way, does the gentleman with the odd skin tone still need

                No, he got safely Laurelled last weekend, and the dye that was left in the
                cuticles after he tried various solutions exfoliated out. He's not really a
                leatherworker, he was just )just!) making apprentice belts for his imminent
                dependents, so I suspect he panicked- most of the rest of us with any
                experience would just say a choice word or two, sigh, clean up as we could,
                and not worry about it wearing off.

                He got through with only two minor disasters- one, he left the banner home
                that his Lady had been working her finger to the bones hand embroidering
                ;-O, and the other he hasn't 'fessed up to- I'm sure we'll hear about it
                sooner or later.

                Meantime, I've been stashing all the information for my files- I've enjoyed
                hearing different solutions, for future reference ;-)
                Phlip

                If it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it is probably not a
                cat.

                Never a horse that cain't be rode,
                And never a rider who cain't be throwed....
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