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bombards and such

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  • jamesahowell@juno.com
    Thanks for filling in the missing pieces, so to speak....... :-{) Finnr
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 26 9:48 PM
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      Thanks for filling in the missing pieces, so to speak....... :-{)>
      Finnr

      > http://www.medievallife.com/Pages/ROM_Bombard.htm
      >
      > It is like a tankard only much bigger. Also it seems to have
      > a welt
      > around the base as well.
      >
      > As for hot drinks. I doubt there is any period way of having
      > hot
      > drinks in a leather tankard. Leather just isn't suited to having
      > boiling
      > water stored in it.
      > You can compromise with a modern sealant like Envirotex or
      > you could
      > just use a seperate ceramic mug.
      >
      > Vitale
    • Gregory G. Stapleton
      And thanks for referring to my web site! ;) If you want to do it by any existing period examples that I’ve ever seen, you need to make the body and handles
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 27 12:27 PM
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        And thanks for referring to my web site! ;)  If you want to do it by any existing period examples that I’ve ever seen, you need to make the body and handles out of one piece, add one or more stiffeners between the handles and sew it up.  I have several pictures of period jacks on my website.  I usually cut out a bottom with a radius somewhere between 3/8” and ½” greater than the radius of the sewn up Jack, wet it and fit it up into the bottom of the Jack with my fingers.  I then punch the holes with an awl as I sew up the bottom.  I’ve used the following to line my jacks, depending upon what they were going to be used for:  black or brewers pitch (for greatest authenticity), beeswax, two-part food grade epoxy (least authentic but will withstand hot and/or alcoholic beverages).

         

        Hope this helps,

        Gregory G. Stapleton

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: jamesahowell@... [mailto:jamesahowell@...]
        Sent: Thursday, June 27, 2002 12:48 AM
        To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [medieval-leather] bombards and such

         

        Thanks for filling in the missing pieces, so to speak.......  :-{)>
        Finnr

        >         http://www.medievallife.com/Pages/ROM_Bombard.htm
        >
        >         It is like a tankard only much bigger. Also it seems to have
        > a welt
        > around the base as well.
        >
        >         As for hot drinks. I doubt there is any period way of having
        > hot
        > drinks in a leather tankard. Leather just isn't suited to having
        > boiling
        > water stored in it.
        >         You can compromise with a modern sealant like Envirotex or
        > you could
        > just use a seperate ceramic mug.
        >
        >         Vitale

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      • Grooby, Peter
        ... I ve used that method in the past and although it works, I ve found it is tricky to get the base of the jack perfectly round. Also due to the fact that the
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 30 3:22 PM
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          > website. I usually cut out a bottom with a radius somewhere between
          > 3/8" and ½" greater than the radius of the sewn up Jack, wet it and fit
          > it up into the bottom of the Jack with my fingers. I then punch the
          > holes with an awl as I sew up the bottom. I've used the following to
          >
          I've used that method in the past and although it works, I've found
          it is tricky to get the base of the jack perfectly round. Also due to the
          fact that the stitching is pulling the leather into place, the stitching
          line is right next to the bottom seam of the jack. Which isn't ideal for
          sealing.

          What I do now is work out what size I want to make the base insert
          then cut out a circle from a scrap piece of plywood then mark out a second
          circle for an insert that is the thickness of my leather smaller than the
          first hole.

          I then soak an oversized piece of leather, place it between the two
          pieces of wood and press one into the other. This forces the leather into a
          cup shape.
          Originally I used my wood vice as a press to press the wood into the
          leather. But I have since found that it is easy enough just by putting my
          weight on the top piece of wood.

          I then take the wood and leather and place it in an oven at approx
          250F for about 20 minutes. (experiment with this) Until it is firm but not
          too hard. then I remove the mould and slip it inside the end of the jack and
          stitch as nomal.

          There are a couple of advantages to this. Firstly you can be sure of
          getting a round base. Secondly, you can recess your stitching line down a
          small way from the apex of the curve where the base turns down. This means
          that you have a section of base and body next too each other before the
          sealant reaches the sttiching. This provides a much better seal, that is
          less likely to leak in the future.

          I've also used a similar method for making the end pieces for
          bottells.

          Vitale



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