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  • Peter Adams
    I suspect the answer is yes. As I stated in an earlier post (if that one went through that is! I have hosts of email problems) the Harness Polishers in the
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 25, 2001
      I suspect the answer is yes.
      As I stated in an earlier post (if that one went through that is! I have
      hosts of email problems) the Harness Polishers in the Mendel Hausbuch
      ad1450-1550 used an item which pictorialy bears a strong profile resemblence
      to a piece of leather affixed to a wooden board with a handle at each end.
      Each polisher has several of these items, implying to me several grades of
      polishing agent.
      I will check Theopholis asap to ascertain his descriptions of polishing
      agents.
      To sharpen a blade, you would be working from grinding wheel to whetstone,
      and then possibly to such strop rubbed with a polishing agent.
      Marc, how old is the word Razor, and what does it mean?

      Peter






      --
      From: Dave Hewitt (Will Styles) [mailto:historylive@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2001 7:57 AM
      To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [medieval-leather] Stropping


      Hi again

      I asked a question earlier about a technique that you current use to
      sharpen your tool to a fine edge, i.e. stropping. What I would like to
      know is was this a technique used by the early craftsmen or is it
      something more recent. The only reference to sharpening that I can
      find is Harrison's reference to fine English wetstones in his
      Description of England. A reply would be appreciated even in the
      negative. My particular interest is in my role as a Tudor Barber.
      Would I have sharpened my razors on a leather or on a wetstone?

      Thanks in anticipation

      Dave Hewitt
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