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Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Leather stain and cliches?

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  • Scott Szakonyi
    If an even coloring is important, I would suggest using Fiebing s Professional Oil dyes, rather than the standard spirit dyes. They give a much more even
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 2, 2001
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      If an even coloring is important, I would suggest
      using Fiebing's Professional Oil dyes, rather than the
      standard spirit dyes. They give a much more even
      coverage than the spirit based dyes. I don't use
      anything else at this point.

      Best of luck,

      Scott

      --- jamesahowell@... wrote:
      > Sorrry, I have been swamped with e-mail
      > lately. Dyes-Feibings
      > Dyes are good quality leather dyes available in a
      > large number of
      > colors-available from Leather Factory and many other
      > leather goods
      > companies. As for the stamps, in period they were
      > made of many
      > materials, including antler-why not try making some?
      > You can carve
      > designs with a knife or use a dremel.
      >
      >
      > Regards, Finnr
      >
      >
      > On Fri, 30 Mar 2001 16:20:34 +0200 Anna Troy
      > <owly@...> writes:
      > > Okay clarification. First of all by "leather
      > stain" I mean that
      > > alcohol?
      > > based liquid that you wipe on to the leather and
      > that equally well
      > > colors
      > > your fingers 8-) most common colors black or
      > brown, called
      > > "narvsv�rta" in
      > > Swedish. As for cliches I was thinking of stamps
      > like the ones used
      > > on that
      > > neat book cover
      > >
      >
      http://www.mywackyworld.com/Championship/images/sabine01_JPG.jpg
      >
      > > Modern
      > > stamps are wrong since they have the background
      > raised. I'd like
      > > these type
      > > of stamps for knife sheaths and other stuff :-)
      > >
      > > Anna T
      > >
      > >
      > > "So many books, so little time."
      > >
      > > "Anna's Crafts Links Page" HAS MOVED! to:
      > > http://owly.terrashare.com
      > >
      > > http://www.terrashare.com/join/owly
      > >
      > >
      > >
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      >
      >
      > "Better is alive than lifeless to be; the living can
      > always get a cow.
      > The halt can ride a horse, the hand-less drive a
      > flock, the deaf can
      > bravely battle.
      > A blind man is better than a burned one; a corpse is
      > useless to all."
      > Havamal
      >


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    • rmhowe
      ... I was reading a book about the Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries of Caistor- by-Norich and Markshall. One thing I was really struck by was the huge amount of
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 23, 2001
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        Anna Troy wrote:
        >
        > Okay clarification. First of all by "leather stain" I mean that alcohol?
        > based liquid that you wipe on to the leather and that equally well colors
        > your fingers 8-) most common colors black or brown, called "narvsvärta" in
        > Swedish. As for cliches I was thinking of stamps like the ones used on that
        > neat book cover
        > http://www.mywackyworld.com/Championship/images/sabine01_JPG.jpg Modern
        > stamps are wrong since they have the background raised. I'd like these type
        > of stamps for knife sheaths and other stuff :-)
        >
        > Anna T
        >
        > "So many books, so little time."
        >
        > "Anna's Crafts Links Page" HAS MOVED! to:
        > http://owly.terrashare.com
        >
        > http://www.terrashare.com/join/owly

        I was reading a book about the Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries of Caistor-
        by-Norich and Markshall. One thing I was really struck by was
        the huge amount of decorative stamps on the pottery. The book
        is by Myre and Green, currently available for about $20 or less
        from Oxbow, and it's huge and hardbound.

        A man identified as only initials, whose last name probably was
        slyly referred to as Mann, apparently spent his whole adult life
        trying to replicate the early Anglo-Saxon pottery types.
        ** He also got extremely good at replicating the stamps out of
        branch ends.** A two page discussion of his techniques is included.
        He seems to have done the best replication the authors were
        aware of.

        I've been considering making some out of antler tips myself.
        I have not seen too much in the way of documentation on
        this that I recall, but I expect it's in the piles somewhere.
        I have most of MacGregor's writings at this point, just limited
        time to look at them.

        So I've grown a bit closer to Marc Carlson's theory of making
        wooden stamps, even though I've cited a couple of metal ones
        in the past and a number of impressions on early period books.

        One of the Caistor potters must have been a mystic. One of the
        stamps looks exactly like an imprint of the Union Jack Flag.
        Others have many variations on decorative themes, shapes, lines
        and animals. The pottery is quite beautiful.

        Keep in mind that we sometimes see pottery and leather items
        in books that replicate each other, particularly bottles and
        shoes used as lamps, etc.

        After a lifetime of experimentation with every type of kiln he
        came to the conclusion that the pots were made by an open
        green foliage fire, the coloring of the pots changing as the
        flames ability to touch them varied, and were coated with hot
        beeswax, while they were still hot from the kiln. This made
        them waterproof. He also tried many types of clay, finally
        settling on the river mud with additions of flint chips and
        ground pottery/tile (grog). He also discovered
        that the reason for the decorative bosses found on the Early
        Anglo-Saxon ware was that their presence on the shoulders of
        vessels permitted the construction of the higher, more closed
        mouthed containers, like flying buttresses on cathedrals.
        Decoration and polishing was done over a period of days and
        probably months.

        You might want to check it out.

        When I get caught up a bit I'll tell you about some other things
        I've found. In the meantime perhaps these things may be of
        interest to the potters among you. The rest of you leatherworkers
        and woodworkers can meditate on your sins and consider that the
        decorative techniques or designs of one craft may well transfer
        to another. Doubtless some of them had meaning. Fenrir is there.

        Pearce, Jacqui: Getting a Handle on Medieval Pottery; in London
        Archaeologist Magazine Winter 1984, Vol. 5, No. 1,
        pp.17-23 with 11 illustrations. Looks at the way potters
        attached handles to a vessel, apparently a lot of these
        were inserted into actual holes in the vessel sides,
        theorizes that the handles "could" have been made by
        throwing a cylinder off the hump and cutting the
        rings (handles) free. Jugs were stabbed at the point
        of attachment and the handles poked through. Sections of
        five baluster and drinking jugs are depicted as well
        as a number of actual photos of handle hole attachments.

        Jenner, Anne: The Potter’s Wheel; a product of function or
        tradition; in London Archaeologist Magazine, Winter 1985,
        Vol. 5, No. 5, pp. 130-4 with three illustrations depicting
        a "cartwheel" type potter’s wheel from C. Singer’s
        A History of Technology, Volume II, 1956 (apparently from
        a medieval illustration, looks to be window glass); the
        strutted wheel (one from a german playing card illustration
        (also from Singer apparently), and the "kickwheel" -
        Foster’s double wheel with depiction from Cipriano
        Piccolopasso’s Three Books of the Potter’s Art depicting
        kickwheels (2) from the side and front. Gives dates and
        provenances for each of the three types according to
        countries and probably centuries.

        Thorn, James and Dorothy: Heraldic Jugs of Forgotten Potters;
        London Archaeologist Magazine, Autumn 1972, Vol. 1, No. 16,
        pp. 372-77. Depicts three jugs in drawings and cross
        sections likely of the de Clare family, earls of Gloucester,
        shields with three chevrons, fleur-de-lys, and escallops
        or a vannet - a pilgrim’s symbol are on the jugs, which
        likely came from Surrey in the early 14th Century. Same
        magazine contains A Pottery at Vauxhall by Brian Bloice.
      • rmhowe
        Casting materials for Pewter and molding rtv rubbers may be had from http://www.micromark.com/ Allcraft Supply in New York -used- to carry, may still, an alloy
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 24, 2001
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          Casting materials for Pewter and molding rtv rubbers may
          be had from http://www.micromark.com/

          Allcraft Supply in New York -used- to carry, may still, an
          alloy that had a very low melting point, approx. 170 degrees F..
          This was used for making matrices (female type molding blocks)
          into which metal stamps with a sheet of metal under them were
          driven. The process that they were used in was an American Indian
          jewelry process. Making Squash Blossom necklaces for example.
          I am not aware of AllCraft having a webpresence. It's been a long
          time since I've purchased from them but they are very much
          in business, advertise in the back of MetalSmith Magazine.

          One way to make impression stamps to cover large areas is
          with a linoleum block carved with a negative imprint.
          In the matter of the size of these a hammer is generally
          not used, a VISE is. One could also use multiple clamps
          on boards on either side of the material. As you carve your
          Linoleum block (linoleum is about 3/16" thick on a 3/4" board)
          you can check your progress by taking impressions of clay
          or Silly Putty. This stuff is commonly had at art stores
          and hobby shops, as are the little carving tools (usually
          exacto gouge and chisel blades that fit the larger handled
          exacto knife handles). Carved dozens of the things in my
          teens.

          Tandy (now Leather Factory) used to make custom leather stamps
          for between $20 and $40. Up to 2 x 2" (4.08mm). I have one of
          my device. I'm pretty sure you can still order these.

          Magnus
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