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Period suede

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  • taran@gci.net
    Greetings, I am trying to find any documentable sources for suede being used between 600-1600. The earliest I have seen the word suede was in the Oxford
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 28, 2000
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      Greetings,

      I am trying to find any documentable sources for suede being used
      between 600-1600. The earliest I have seen the word suede was in the
      Oxford English Dictionary with a date of 1859 defining it as soft kid
      skin. Does anyone have sources showing suede as we know it today?

      Thanks in advance,
      Taran
    • The_redman@compuserve.com
      In a message dated 11/28/00 1:33:06 AM, taran@gci.net writes:
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 28, 2000
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        In a message dated 11/28/00 1:33:06 AM, taran@... writes:

        << Oxford English Dictionary with a date of 1859 defining it as soft kid
        skin. Does anyone have sources showing suede as we know it today? >>

        Well, my understanding of "real" suede is that it is regular grain leather
        with the surface sanded to produce a "nap". The term is also used to refer to
        the "flesh" side of the leather, and "suede splits" are interior pieces of
        the leather with the outer grain leather layer removed.

        If you interpret the term suede to mean a non-grain surface of leather, I'm
        sure it must have been used (every piece of leather has two sides, after
        all). So do you present the smooth (grain) side, or the rough (flesh) side?
        Depends on what you're trying to do with it, strength and appearance-wise.

        There's my two cents

        Duryn/John
      • Jonathan T Getty
        ... If nothing else, leather garments with the fur intact and on the inside would leave the flesh side out. I ve seen shoes and a coat done this way. jon/todde
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 29, 2000
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          > If you interpret the term suede to mean a non-grain surface of leather, I'm
          > sure it must have been used (every piece of leather has two sides, after
          > all). So do you present the smooth (grain) side, or the rough (flesh) side?
          > Depends on what you're trying to do with it, strength and appearance-wise.

          If nothing else, leather garments with the fur intact and on the inside
          would leave the flesh side out. I've seen shoes and a coat done this way.

          jon/todde
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