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Pouches

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  • Peter Grooby
    I was looking at some pictures last night of the type of 14/15th century pouches that have a gap at the top for a dagger. ... __ __/ _______/ Sort of
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3 2:22 PM
      I was looking at some pictures last night of the type of 14/15th century
      pouches that have a gap at the top for a dagger.

      ____ ____
      -------| |-----| |---------------
      | | | |
      -------|..+-----+..|---------------
      || ||
      |+-----------+|
      \__ __/
      \_______/

      Sort of like this.

      The thing I was wondering about was how the flap was fastened down.
      Although there are a number of options, toggles, loops, buckles etc, I could
      use, I would like to find out what was most commonly done in period,

      The book I was looking at is redrawings of manuscript pictures so is not
      very reliable, but the most common method, seemed to be, no fastening at
      all.

      I was consicering this. If I semed across the loops where the ..s are above,
      to hold the pouch in place, this would tend to make the flap push down. Also
      if the puch was reasonably deep, it would have to open out quite a ways
      pushing the flap outwards before it would spill its contents.

      I did see one example that had a buckle holding the flap shut, so that is
      another option.

      Any comments observations?

      Vitale
    • Anna Troy
      I ve made one of those. They are very simple to make. The flap and the back is one piece and then front is one piece sewed on all the way round. A slit was
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 4 1:22 AM
        I've made one of those. They are very simple to make. The flap and the back
        is one piece and then front is one piece sewed on all the way round. A slit
        was then made so there is an opening. There are no extra hangers. You tuck
        the flap itself under your belt and then you just let it hang over the
        belt. The flap is as large as the rest of the pouch and it has an extra
        leather edge sewn on to make it a little heavier. It works though. You can
        find pictures of them in one of the "Medieval Finds from Excavations in
        London" books. I think it was the one about Dress Accessories. I hope I
        understood what type of pouch you wrote about :)

        Anna T.




        At 09:22 2000-08-04 +1200, you wrote:
        >I was looking at some pictures last night of the type of 14/15th century
        >pouches that have a gap at the top for a dagger.
        >
        > ____ ____
        >-------| |-----| |---------------
        > | | | |
        >-------|..+-----+..|---------------
        > || ||
        > |+-----------+|
        > \__ __/
        > \_______/
        >
        >Sort of like this.
        >
        >The thing I was wondering about was how the flap was fastened down.
        >Although there are a number of options, toggles, loops, buckles etc, I could
        >use, I would like to find out what was most commonly done in period,
        >
        >The book I was looking at is redrawings of manuscript pictures so is not
        >very reliable, but the most common method, seemed to be, no fastening at
        >all.
        >
        >I was consicering this. If I semed across the loops where the ..s are above,
        >to hold the pouch in place, this would tend to make the flap push down. Also
        >if the puch was reasonably deep, it would have to open out quite a ways
        >pushing the flap outwards before it would spill its contents.
        >
        >I did see one example that had a buckle holding the flap shut, so that is
        >another option.
        >
        >Any comments observations?
        >
        >Vitale
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
        "Librarians are Academia Nuts"

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        http://hem.fyristorg.com/owly/crafts

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        http://hem.passagen.se/owly/index2.html
      • TJ Brunzie
        ... At the International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, MI, this year, Robert Charrette of La Belle Compagnie, Inc. gave a paper about his attempts to
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 4 9:03 AM
          > The thing I was wondering about was how the flap was fastened down.
          > Although there are a number of options, toggles, loops, buckles
          > etc, I could
          > use, I would like to find out what was most commonly done in period,

          At the International Medieval Congress in Kalamazoo, MI, this year,
          Robert Charrette of La Belle Compagnie, Inc. gave a paper about his
          attempts to reconstruct a pouch much like the one you drew in ASCII
          characters. His paper was called "Purse Styles and Construction".
          I believe he used a buckle to hold shut his reconstruction. If you
          want to contact him about it, their website is
          http://www.labelle.org/home.html.

          Cheers,
          Violante
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