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[medieval-leather] leather shoe weight

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  • Melanie Wilson
    ... home, but when much foot travel was to be done, pattens were worn the majority of the time. Or. . . I m not sure pattens could be worn for long periods of
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3 12:01 AM
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      >1) the shoes were worn by themselves, primarily indoors or around the
      home,
      but when much foot travel was to be done, pattens were worn the majority of
      the time. Or. . .

      I'm not sure pattens could be worn for long periods of walking or servere
      discomfort, basically I find the pretty useless, unless you are going
      straight from A to B (short distance) and want to keep your feet dry &
      warmer. You certainly can work on the land with them, or near animals you
      want to get out of the way of quickly :)

      >2) we are just underestimating the toughness of these people's feet.
      After
      all, there are many cultures today who go barefoot exclusively. Those
      furry
      Gaelic curarans I wear have only the thickness of one deer or cow hide and
      yet
      that is what the Gaels wore for over 2000 years. Just because our modern
      tootsies are sensitive just means we are papmered.

      I'm sure you are I go barefoot most of the summer & in costume in wet
      coditions in preferance to wearing shoes, as I prefer wet feet that dry
      easily than feet with damp lumps of leather on them :) I had an op on my
      foot a few years ago the surgen complained I had skin like rhino hide, I've
      also troddon on glass barefoot without it cutting and walked around the
      Lake District (England) on an event where we skirmish through a large wood
      all day, most od which is covered with slaty sharp stones.

      As a youngster, when I waLKED A LOT, I'd do it barefoot and that way I
      NEVER got blisters from my walking books and that was 20 + miles a day.

      Mel

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    • EoganOg@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/3/99 3:02:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... My point exactly! When one does go barefoot more often than not, one tends to develop tough
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 3 5:37 AM
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        In a message dated 3/3/99 3:02:12 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        MelanieWilson@... writes:

        > I'm sure you are I go barefoot most of the summer & in costume in wet
        > coditions in preferance to wearing shoes, as I prefer wet feet that dry
        > easily than feet with damp lumps of leather on them :) I had an op on my
        > foot a few years ago the surgen complained I had skin like rhino hide, I've
        > also troddon on glass barefoot without it cutting and walked around the
        > Lake District (England) on an event where we skirmish through a large wood
        > all day, most od which is covered with slaty sharp stones.

        My point exactly! When one does go barefoot more often than not, one tends to
        develop tough skin, calouses (and flat feet!). But that does aid in the
        protection of the foot. Also, when people marvel that my Gaelic curarans had
        no hard soles, I have to remind them that most historic peoples did not have
        to contend with walking over what we have to walk on (rough gravel roads and
        paths, broken glass on the sidewalk, etc.)

        Aye,
        Eogan

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