Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[medieval-leather] Strange new question regarding medieval shoes

Expand Messages
  • Marc Carlson
    Ian, I have an odd question for you. As I mentioned in your office, in looking at the shoes in the various museums, that there seem to be no lasting tack
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Ian,
      I have an odd question for you. As I mentioned in your office, in looking
      at the
      shoes in the various museums, that there seem to be no lasting tack holes
      (and yes,
      there are the couple you showed me, but those were -it-. I have just been
      informed
      by someone who's field of interest is 17th and 18th century shoes (but
      isn't Al),
      but studied with Olaf, that "Oh, well, medieval shoes were lasted with flat
      pins,
      so the holes dissapear."

      My thought is that it's a clever way to cover for the fact there seem to be
      no holes,
      but I haven't run into this before -- does this sound familiar to you? If
      you don't
      mind, if you could ask around, I want to know where this thing came from.
      Is there
      something unpublished someplace that I've just missed, or is this source
      just trying
      to feed me some bovine excrement?

      Marc
    • Ian Carlisle
      ... No, I m afraid that is the first I ve heard of it. To be honest, I can t see how the holes would completely disappear. On a related note, I ve been looking
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 2, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        On 1 Dec 99, at 10:34, Marc Carlson wrote:

        > Ian,
        > I have an odd question for you. As I mentioned in your office, in looking
        > at the
        > shoes in the various museums, that there seem to be no lasting tack holes
        > (and yes,
        > there are the couple you showed me, but those were -it-. I have just been
        > informed
        > by someone who's field of interest is 17th and 18th century shoes (but
        > isn't Al),
        > but studied with Olaf, that "Oh, well, medieval shoes were lasted with flat
        > pins,
        > so the holes dissapear."
        >
        > My thought is that it's a clever way to cover for the fact there seem to be
        > no holes,
        > but I haven't run into this before -- does this sound familiar to you?

        No, I'm afraid that is the first I've heard of it. To be honest, I can't
        see how the holes would completely disappear.

        On a related note, I've been looking at the Anglo-Scandinavian last
        from Lloyds Bank, Pavement, York and it has nail holes in all the
        right places. There are three at the back, corresponding with the
        hole we see in triangular heel risers of the period. There are also
        two grooves on the bottom - one at the tread and one at the front of
        the seat. The one at the tread has had leather tacked into it. Our
        thinking is that these grooves were caused by repeated nailing in
        the same two places and that the leather tacked into one of them
        was a repair.

        Ian
      • jamesahowell@juno.com
        ... I realized after reading the post above that I must have been asleep when I replied to this the last time. However, a similar principle applies to wood.
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 2, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          > On a related note, I've been looking at the Anglo-Scandinavian last
          > from Lloyds Bank, Pavement, York and it has nail holes in all the
          > right places. There are three at the back, corresponding with the
          > hole we see in triangular heel risers of the period. There are also
          > two grooves on the bottom - one at the tread and one at the front of
          > the seat. The one at the tread has had leather tacked into it. Our
          > thinking is that these grooves were caused by repeated nailing in
          > the same two places and that the leather tacked into one of them
          > was a repair.
          >
          I realized after reading the post above that I must have been asleep
          when I replied to this the last time. However, a similar principle
          applies to wood. There is a well known technique for removing dents from
          wood (used primarily by those who refinish gunstocks) whereby the area in
          question is steamed, raising the fibres of the wood and many times making
          the dent disappear completely. Since wood generally survives best in
          water-logged conditions, it may be that the constant wetness performs a
          similar function.
          I have a last from the modern era, and it has a piece of leather tacked
          in place at the ball of the foot, for apparently the same reason as sited
          above, to compensate for costantly driving tacks into the same area on
          the last. Regards, James
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.