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[medieval-leather] Re: Turf cutters = leather knives? Hey, Ian! was Nail holes on shoe so

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  • Glenda Robinson
    ... From: Ian Carlisle To: medieval-leather@egroups.com Date: Monday, 26
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 30, 1999
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: Ian Carlisle <ICarlisle.Artefact_Research.YAT@...>
      To: medieval-leather@egroups.com <medieval-leather@egroups.com>
      Date: Monday, 26 April 1999 5:28
      Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Hey, Ian! was Nail holes on shoe so


      Ian wrote about half moon knives v. Roman turf cutters:

      >I'd be glad of a reference if you have one?
      >
      Exercitus Vol 2, No 4, Spring 1988 on p60 in an article titled "The
      Turf-Cutter and the Roman Army" by Nicholas Fuentes (2 Ex 60, 1988)

      The main argument of the article is that implements which have been
      identified as "turf cutters" are misnamed, particularly there is no evidence
      for the use of the tools and they are generally found in civilian, rather
      than military contexts. Three size categories of "turf cutters" are
      identified, 120mm, 165mm and 205mm across, the smallest is plainly
      inadequate for cutting turf. Two extant blades, one from Great Casterton and
      the other from Colchester almost exactly match the size and shape of the
      modern half moon knife made by Dixon. Fuentes also suggests that the larger
      ones are barking irons for stripping tree bark to be used in tanning.

      Exerecitus is the bulletin of the Ermine Street Guard. Contact details are:
      The Ermine Street Guard,
      Oaklands Farm, Dog Lane,
      Crickley Hill, Witcombe
      Gloucestershire, GL3 4UG

      Wayne



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    • Peter Adams
      Turf cutters, can be seen illustrated in drawing (p25) and in text (p26) _The Spade in Northern and Atlantic Europe_ (ed. Alan Gailey and Alexander Fenton,
      Message 2 of 2 , May 2 6:35 PM
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        Turf cutters, can be seen illustrated in drawing (p25) and in text
        (p26) _The Spade in Northern and Atlantic Europe_ (ed. Alan Gailey and
        Alexander Fenton, Ulwter Folk Museum, Institute of Irish Studies, Queens
        University of Belfast 1970)
        The discussion claims the Roman introduction of the turfcutter of the
        style described as having a "half moon blade and a long socket" I would
        desccribe the blades in this book as more of a crescent than a half
        moon, and the shanks are far longer than that I would consider
        practical. My demi-lunar had a short handle, which I further shortened
        in accordance with what I read in an Al Stohlman book, so that it would
        fit in the palm.
        I am still wondering if anyone knows the provenance of the demi-lunar
        which I saw in the Museum of London in 1992-3 It had a spike and handle
        so that it almost looks like a miniature halberd. A similar knife is
        illustrated twice in the same woodcut, laying on a table and on a
        counter, on p58,"the Shoemaker" (_The Book of Trades (standebuch)_ Jost
        Amman and Hans Sachs With An Introduction by Benjamin A. Rifkin, Dover
        Publications, NY 1973 isbn 0-486-2286-X)

        Citaciously,
        Peter



        Glenda Robinson wrote:
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Ian Carlisle <ICarlisle.Artefact_Research.YAT@...>
        > To: medieval-leather@egroups.com <medieval-leather@egroups.com>
        > Date: Monday, 26 April 1999 5:28
        > Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Hey, Ian! was Nail holes on shoe so
        >
        > Ian wrote about half moon knives v. Roman turf cutters:
        >
        > >I'd be glad of a reference if you have one?
        > >
        > Exercitus Vol 2, No 4, Spring 1988 on p60 in an article titled "The
        > Turf-Cutter and the Roman Army" by Nicholas Fuentes (2 Ex 60, 1988)
        >
        > The main argument of the article is that implements which have been
        > identified as "turf cutters" are misnamed, particularly there is no evidence
        > for the use of the tools and they are generally found in civilian, rather
        > than military contexts. Three size categories of "turf cutters" are
        > identified, 120mm, 165mm and 205mm across, the smallest is plainly
        > inadequate for cutting turf. Two extant blades, one from Great Casterton and
        > the other from Colchester almost exactly match the size and shape of the
        > modern half moon knife made by Dixon. Fuentes also suggests that the larger
        > ones are barking irons for stripping tree bark to be used in tanning.
        >
        > Exerecitus is the bulletin of the Ermine Street Guard. Contact details are:
        > The Ermine Street Guard,
        > Oaklands Farm, Dog Lane,
        > Crickley Hill, Witcombe
        > Gloucestershire, GL3 4UG
        >
        > Wayne
        >
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