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Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Embroidering Leather

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  • Diane Sawyer Dooley
    Yes, but I wouldn t want to use those for embroidery, lest I snag and cut the embroidery thread. Sinew and waxed linen for sewing leather is sterner stuff.
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 20, 2013
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      Yes, but I wouldn't want to use those for embroidery, lest I snag and cut the embroidery thread. Sinew and waxed linen for sewing leather is sterner stuff.

      Tasha





      >________________________________
      > From: "silveroak@..." <silveroak@...>
      >To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Saturday, July 20, 2013 3:20 PM
      >Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Embroidering Leather
      >
      >
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      >
      >Greetings,
      >
      >What about chamois leather?  I had the unexpected pleasure of handling some 2 months ago, and it was amazingly soft.  I can't sew to save my life, my embroidery makes cats laugh (and I have the pics to prove it), but I could embroider on it.  I'd still use an awl, though.  For that matter, I'd use a designated embroiderer....
      >
      >Aren't there special needles for leather sewing?  Triangular, if I recall correctly, to prevent ripping?
      >
      >-Carowyn
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    • R Schooley
      I do, but only in more modern pieces.  I m usually working on garment leather, around 2 to 4 oz but the technique should work on something heavier.  I just
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 20, 2013
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        I do, but only in more modern pieces.  I'm usually working on garment leather, around 2 to 4 oz but the technique should work on something heavier.  I just pre-punch the holes for the outline, either with and awl or using stiching chisels (I've gotten some that have the prongs about 3 mm apart which is perfect) and embroider the outline using a back stitch.  I've used cotton, linen and silk floss with no problems although I have found I have to have the floss a bit thicker to get the right look.  The biggest thing to watch for is stitch length, you can't let it go too small or you just end up creating a perforated line, at this point the 3 mm I can get with my chisels it smallest I'm comfortable going.   I have not been able to figure out how to do a fill, couching might work, but I have not tried it yet.
         
        To give you an idea of how it looks on a finished piece this is a card case I recently finished.   I used silk floss to outling the embossed design on the leather, holes pre-punched using an awl.
         
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/ravenshold/8873879116/
         
        Rebecca


        ________________________________
        From: Sean <mapshaker2000@...>
        To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, July 19, 2013 8:57 PM
        Subject: [medieval-leather] Embroidering Leather


         

        Has anyone ever had experience in embroidering leather? I have a large piece of 4-5 oz leather that I want to make into a satchel and embroider it. I know that isn't quite medieval in design, but it's for me to use not for display. My main issue is whether to just do an outline type of embroidery or trying to do a fill. I can't even start to think about how to do a fill on thick leather.




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      • Henry Plouse
        I love chamois - I use it all the time: To line bracers and my leather armor (because it is great at absorbing sweat and keeping you cool), to line sheaths
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 20, 2013
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          I love chamois - I use it all the time: To line bracers and my leather armor (because it is great at absorbing sweat and keeping you cool), to line sheaths (when size considerations don't allow the use of woolen hide) and quivers (to help prevent rusting of blades and arrowheads), and, occasionally, to make bags and gloves (rather than as a lining leather).  Here's a hint - the first time I bought chamois, at a leather shop, it was grossly pricey, however, I then discovered that I could get the same quality chamois for a fraction of that price at places like "Harbor Freight Tools", where it is sold for washing and polishing cars.
           
          As for "special needles" for leatherworking, the answer is "yes" and "no".  I have fairly stout, sharp needles for hand use and for use in my "Speedy Sewing Awls" however those are not always suitable to the purpose and, moreover, they're not really necessary if you pre-punch the leather, which is why I own just about every kind of punch on the market.  Even so, for some jobs, it's back to a brad, a hammer and a pair of needle nose pliers. It's worth the effort, tho', because pre-punching means that you can use a needle appropriate to the thread and the job, without worrying aout the medium you are sewing.
           
          YOS,
          ALRIC, Glyn Dwfn   


          ________________________________
          From: "silveroak@..." <silveroak@...>
          To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Saturday, July 20, 2013 12:20 PM
          Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Embroidering Leather





          Greetings,

          What about chamois leather?  I had the unexpected pleasure of handling some 2 months ago, and it was amazingly soft.  I can't sew to save my life, my embroidery makes cats laugh (and I have the pics to prove it), but I could embroider on it.  I'd still use an awl, though.  For that matter, I'd use a designated embroiderer....

          Aren't there special needles for leather sewing?  Triangular, if I recall correctly, to prevent ripping?

          -Carowyn



          ____________________________________________________________
          Moviefone - Official Site
          Find the Latest Movie Showtimes and Your Nearest Theaters at Moviefone.
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        • petemonahan
          Looks like we re all headed in the same general direction. I m luck enough to have a real finder in my city [Toronto] - Capital Findings - so I too have a
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 21, 2013
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            Looks like we're all headed in the same general direction. I'm luck enough to have a real 'finder' in my city [Toronto] - Capital Findings - so I too have a very wide selection of awl points and have never felt the need to use a brad. have used the needle noses to pull through needles though, which is why I buy packs of 20! And once you've pre-punched you can use nice blunt tipped needles if you like and never snag or cut your floss!



            Yes, triangular pointed glover's needles will punch their own holes, but are meant for fine leather - chamois weight and lighter - where pre-punching hundreds of holes for a pair of gloves would be excessively tedious. I too pre-punch everything, so technically I 'stitch' rather than 'sewing'. And, yes, I've created perforated lines by stitching with holes too close together. very frustrating when the work rips apart immediately upon use! # cm spacing sounds about he closest I'd try to, but as Alric says, if you're gonna wind up adding a backing for strength, why not just do it on the backing anyway? My final two cents worth!

            Peter
          • Diane Sawyer Dooley
            3 cm or 3mm? TAsha ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 21, 2013
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              3 cm or 3mm?

              TAsha





              >________________________________
              > From: petemonahan <petemonahan@...>
              >To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
              >Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2013 7:59 PM
              >Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Embroidering Leather
              >
              >
              >

              >Looks like we're all headed in the same general direction. I'm luck enough to have a real 'finder' in my city [Toronto] - Capital Findings - so I too have a very wide selection of awl points and have never felt the need to use a brad. have used the needle noses to pull through needles though, which is why I buy packs of 20! And once you've pre-punched you can use nice blunt tipped needles if you like and never snag or cut your floss!
              >
              >Yes, triangular pointed glover's needles will punch their own holes, but are meant for fine leather - chamois weight and lighter - where pre-punching hundreds of holes for a pair of gloves would be excessively tedious. I too pre-punch everything, so technically I 'stitch' rather than 'sewing'. And, yes, I've created perforated lines by stitching with holes too close together. very frustrating when the work rips apart immediately upon use! # cm spacing sounds about he closest I'd try to, but as Alric says, if you're gonna wind up adding a backing for strength, why not just do it on the backing anyway? My final two cents worth!
              >
              >Peter
              >
              >
              >__.
              >
              >

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