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Re: [medieval-leather] Vinegar black/vinegaroon

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  • Ginny Phillips
    Thank you for posting this! I have been away from email for a while, sorry for the delay in my reply. Gillian ________________________________ From: Ron
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 5, 2012
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      Thank you for posting this!
      I have been away from email for a while, sorry for the delay in my reply.

      Gillian



      ________________________________
      From: Ron Charlotte <ronch2@...>
      To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2012 4:53 PM
      Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Vinegar black/vinegaroon


       
      It's been awhile since this one was asked, but I
      have at least one valid answer.

      Recipe #168 from _The Plitcho_(LOC# 68-18235), a
      dyers manual from 1548. This comes from a
      version published by MIT in 1968 that includes
      the original Italian text in facsimile. The last
      section of the book has numerous leather tanning and dying recipies.

      "To dye skins in black color.
      Measure one pound of crushed gallnuts that is
      pestled. Make it boil at least one hour, and
      then take it from the fire. With a brush give it
      two strokes per skin of the said water and leave
      it to dry in the shade. When they are dry, take
      again of this water and with the brush return to
      dye them. Then having done this, take some
      vinegar, very strong, and make it boil with some
      rusty iron inside so that the iron was not good
      for any other service, and that the vinegar be
      two or three fingers above the iron. When it has
      boiled four hours take it from the fire and allow
      to cool. Then with this boiled vinegar give two
      or more hands to the above said skins with the
      brush and set them in the shade. Take the
      polisher and stroke them that they become black, very black."

      Since most of the accompanying tanning recipes
      are alum based or alum/oil they were using the
      gall nut liquid to put tannin in the leather for
      the rusty vinegar to react with. I've used this
      recipe on oak tan leather and gotten a pretty
      good black after a couple of coats. The reaction
      continues awhile, and the belt I did this with
      originally actually got darker over the course of
      about a week. Since some tannages are lighter
      than others, even veg-tan leather might benefit
      from the additional tannin. i've not tried that, yet.

      At 10:01 PM 5/13/2012, you wrote:
      >
      >
      >Hi, Folks,
      >
      >I know that there has been discussion here on
      >the use of vinegaroon/vinegar black in the
      >middle ages. Does anyone have good documentation
      >for it. I seem to be turning up only anecdotal references.
      >
      >Thanks!
      >
      >Gillian
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
      ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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