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Image Transfer

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  • wolfblood76
    Hi everyone, I hope you guys don t mind me asking this leather related question here. I was wondering if anyone here has ever done a heat transfer on leather
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 9, 2011
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      Hi everyone,
      I hope you guys don't mind me asking this leather related question here. I was wondering if anyone here has ever done a heat transfer on leather using their home printer and an iron. If it's possible to do, is there a specific type of heat transfer paper you recommend? Thanks.
    • tasha_medvedeva
      ... What kind of leather? I wouldn t do that for anything, especially on veg tan. Not when it s so easy to transfer a carving pattern using printing vellum
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 10, 2011
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        --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "wolfblood76" <drakula@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi everyone,
        > I hope you guys don't mind me asking this leather related question here. I was wondering if anyone here has ever done a heat transfer on leather using their home printer and an iron. If it's possible to do, is there a specific type of heat transfer paper you recommend? Thanks.
        >

        What kind of leather? I wouldn't do that for anything, especially on veg tan. Not when it's so easy to transfer a carving pattern using printing vellum and a stylus.

        Tasha
      • ISAK010@aol.com
        OK, You would be better off to use a printer with cheap non water proof ink. Case the leather then carefully lay the paper on it. There will be some bleed
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 10, 2011
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          OK, You would be better off to use a printer with cheap non water proof
          ink. Case the leather then carefully lay the paper on it. There will be
          some bleed mind you and the wetter the leather the more bleed.

          What I do is copy the designs then use clear packing take to cover both
          sides of the design. Make sure the tape goes about 1/4 past the edge of the
          paper to keep water from getting to the paper and the strips overlap each
          other slightly. Then I use a stylus and trace the design onto lightly cased
          leather. Then tool away...
          I have patterns like this that I use that are over 10 years old.

          Feel free to contact me with questions.

          Michael Walden
          A Leather Crafter
          _Isak010@..._ (mailto:Isak010@...)

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Henry Plouse
          What I find works very well is to take my picture or pattern down to a place like Kinkos and have them print it as an iron on transfer (what s nice about
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 10, 2011
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            What I find works very well is to take my picture or pattern down to a place like "Kinkos" and have them print it as an iron on transfer (what's nice about that is that they can reverse or not reverse the design, so you can do half a pattern, print one each way, and get an elaborately detailed and symmetrical pattern for half the work).  The pattern can then be ironed onto the leather, just like ironing it on a T-Shirt.  Note, this works with BOTH chrome tanned and veg-tanned leather, but you need it to be fairly light colored leather (don't try to print on black leather...).  It works if you just want to apply a pattern for carving or tooling or if you actually want to impress an illustration onto the leather.
             
            While obviously not an authentic decorative technique, I occasionally use this method for what I call my "Medievalesque" items.  For instance, I made a very competent leather first aid kit (with a large, shoulder slung bag for the big items and the main supplies, along with a couple detachable pouches, which could be removed and then worn on a belt, for first aid stuff such as bandaids, Neosporin, etc.) which I decorated with some decorative "cameos" onto which I'd ironed a nice illustration (of Iduna and/or Freya) by Arthur Rackham.  Looks wonderful and the transfer has proven surprisingly durable (more so than painting the leather).
             
            YOS,
            ALRIC
             
             
             
             
             
            --- On Sun, 4/10/11, ISAK010@... <ISAK010@...> wrote:


            From: ISAK010@... <ISAK010@...>
            Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Image Transfer
            To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, April 10, 2011, 7:31 AM


             



            OK, You would be better off to use a printer with cheap non water proof
            ink. Case the leather then carefully lay the paper on it. There will be
            some bleed mind you and the wetter the leather the more bleed.

            What I do is copy the designs then use clear packing take to cover both
            sides of the design. Make sure the tape goes about 1/4 past the edge of the
            paper to keep water from getting to the paper and the strips overlap each
            other slightly. Then I use a stylus and trace the design onto lightly cased
            leather. Then tool away...
            I have patterns like this that I use that are over 10 years old.

            Feel free to contact me with questions.

            Michael Walden
            A Leather Crafter
            _Isak010@..._ (mailto:Isak010@...)

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Henry Plouse
            As noted in my prior post, I routinely use iron-on transfers to decorate leather for items I make - nothing like transferring a Howard Pyle or a Wyatt
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 10, 2011
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              As noted in my prior post, I routinely use "iron-on transfers" to decorate leather for items I make - nothing like transferring a Howard Pyle or a Wyatt "Pirate" illustration onto a piece of leather that is then incorporated into a pouch or bag for a wannabe "Modern-Day Pyrate".  I've NOT tried it using a home computer printer and I don't know if the inks they use or the paper that's available are suitable, but I have done it using transfers made for me by "Kinkos" or a similar copying shop, on the assumption that they have the goods and the gear to do it right ("Custom T-Shirt Shops" will also do this for you and, of course, they have all the needful equipment and supplies).  A non-reversed transfer costs about $3.50 and a reversed one maybe $5.00.
               
              I've found that the technique works on either chrome or veg tanned leather and is surprisingly durable, especially on the former.
               
              After much experimentation, I can also tell you that you need to use a very light colored leather (white to light cream/tan - not all veg-tanned is light enough for it) and it is critical that the leather have as smooth and "closed grain" a surface as possible.  Even a lightly "pebbled" texture will ruin the transfer.  Otherwise, it's worked surprisingly well for me.  Using the transfer is far preferable to painting, especially when the leather is going to be flexed or bent or otherwise subjected to stresses which would cause paint to flake off.
               
              YOS,
              ALRIC 
               
               
               

              --- On Sun, 4/10/11, tasha_medvedeva <tasha_medvedeva@...> wrote:


              From: tasha_medvedeva <tasha_medvedeva@...>
              Subject: [medieval-leather] Re: Image Transfer
              To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, April 10, 2011, 6:36 AM


               





              --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "wolfblood76" <drakula@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi everyone,
              > I hope you guys don't mind me asking this leather related question here. I was wondering if anyone here has ever done a heat transfer on leather using their home printer and an iron. If it's possible to do, is there a specific type of heat transfer paper you recommend? Thanks.
              >

              What kind of leather? I wouldn't do that for anything, especially on veg tan. Not when it's so easy to transfer a carving pattern using printing vellum and a stylus.

              Tasha








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • nijso beishuizen
              Hello all, A late medieval shoe (1300-1350) with a bird design was shown on an exhibition in the Netherlands last year. A picture that I made can be seen here:
              Message 6 of 7 , May 16, 2011
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                Hello all,

                A late medieval shoe (1300-1350) with a bird design was shown on an exhibition in the Netherlands last year.
                A picture that I made can be seen here:

                http://m-silkwork.blogspot.com/2010/09/exhibition-dedicated-to-memory-of-olaf.html

                The description for this shoe said that to create the bird, the surface of the leather around the bird was scraped away.
                I tried to recreate this design by just using a sharp knife, but this is pretty difficult except for large surfaces.
                Especially the long straight thin lines between the open punchwork is difficult, I did not even attempt to do that.
                Does somebody know if there are special tools to do this? How would one scrape away a part of the surface of the leather
                in a long thin straight line? use a lancet or something?


                Regards,
                Nijso





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • tasha_medvedeva
                I d use a free-hand stitch gouger. Tasha Sent from my iPhone
                Message 7 of 7 , May 16, 2011
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                  I'd use a free-hand stitch gouger.

                  Tasha

                  Sent from my iPhone

                  --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, nijso beishuizen <bigfootedrockmidget@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > A late medieval shoe (1300-1350) with a bird design was shown on an exhibition in the Netherlands last year.
                  > A picture that I made can be seen here:
                  >
                  > http://m-silkwork.blogspot.com/2010/09/exhibition-dedicated-to-memory-of-olaf.html
                  >
                  > The description for this shoe said that to create the bird, the surface of the leather around the bird was scraped away.
                  > I tried to recreate this design by just using a sharp knife, but this is pretty difficult except for large surfaces.
                  > Especially the long straight thin lines between the open punchwork is difficult, I did not even attempt to do that.
                  > Does somebody know if there are special tools to do this? How would one scrape away a part of the surface of the leather
                  > in a long thin straight line? use a lancet or something?
                  >
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  > Nijso
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
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