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Linseed oil and leather

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  • Colin
    I ve been talking to someone rescently who said that he d had problems with linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the leather
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 15, 2010
      I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
      linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
      leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
      have any experience in this area?

      Many thanks

      Colin
    • Edward DuBios
      Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 15, 2010
        Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.

        YIS
        Master Edward DuBois
        Duchy of Bisqaia
        Adrian Empire

        On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:

        > I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
        > linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
        > leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
        > have any experience in this area?
        >
        > Many thanks
        >
        > Colin
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • steve pole
        Doesn t the neetsfoot stop the dye from penetrating the leather?
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 16, 2010
          Doesn't the neetsfoot stop the dye from penetrating the leather?

          On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 07:29 GMT Edward DuBios wrote:

          >Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.
          >
          >YIS
          >Master Edward DuBois
          >Duchy of Bisqaia
          >Adrian Empire
          >
          >On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:
          >
          >> I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
          >> linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
          >> leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
          >> have any experience in this area?
          >>
          >> Many thanks
          >>
          >> Colin
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Ginny Phillips
          Was he using boiled linseed oil or raw linseed oil? I m familiar with both in a woodworking context, but not a leatherworking one. Boiled linseed oil
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 16, 2010
            Was he using boiled linseed oil or raw linseed oil?

            I'm familiar with both in a woodworking context, but not a leatherworking one.
            "Boiled" linseed oil contains some drying agents that can be dangerous and
            highly flammable. We had an incident with a rag used to apply boiled linseed oil
            that was not spread out to dry, and nearly set the house ablaze. The fumes were
            noxious. Plus, it's a thoroughly modern chemical.

            I've used raw linseed oil to finish wood, and it takes a long time to dry
            thoroughly, even when put on in a thin application. I would guess it would make
            the leather quite sticky until it dried.

            I concur with the suggestion to use neatsfoot oil on leather. Excellent stuff.

            Gillian







            ________________________________
            From: Colin <bigned@...>
            To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, November 15, 2010 12:16:54 PM
            Subject: [medieval-leather] Linseed oil and leather


            I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
            linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
            leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
            have any experience in this area?

            Many thanks

            Colin







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Edward DuBios
            Neatsfoot is a natural product made from cattle. It will darken the leather slightly. I apply it to the flesh side but after a couple of days it evenly
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 16, 2010
              Neatsfoot is a natural product made from cattle. It will darken the leather slightly. I apply it to the flesh side but after a couple of days it evenly distributes though out the leather. It helps condition and counter the drying effect of dyeing. The leather will be softer and more flexible (belts). Too much will soften leather to the point leather will lose it's structure. I apply it as if it were a light coating of dye.

              YIS
              Edward

              On Nov 16, 2010, at 5:10, steve pole <leathstitch@...> wrote:

              > Doesn't the neetsfoot stop the dye from penetrating the leather?
              >
              > On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 07:29 GMT Edward DuBios wrote:
              >
              > >Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.
              > >
              > >YIS
              > >Master Edward DuBois
              > >Duchy of Bisqaia
              > >Adrian Empire
              > >
              > >On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >> I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
              > >> linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
              > >> leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
              > >> have any experience in this area?
              > >>
              > >> Many thanks
              > >>
              > >> Colin
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Colin
              I use a 50% mix of olive oil and bees wax on my shoes and belts. It makes the leather lovely and supple. I m actually using the linseed oil on baked leather.
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 16, 2010
                I use a 50% mix of olive oil and bees wax on my shoes and belts. It makes the leather lovely and supple.

                I'm actually using the linseed oil on baked leather. My theory is that it will help to stiffen it further as it sets. I'm thinking that if this works, it might be how boiled leather was done. I know that Robin Wood dips his bowls into hot linsee oil to protect them. Would the same work for leather?

                Best wishes

                Colin

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Edward DuBios
                To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 7:29 AM
                Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Linseed oil and leather



                Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.

                YIS
                Master Edward DuBois
                Duchy of Bisqaia
                Adrian Empire

                On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:

                > I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
                > linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
                > leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
                > have any experience in this area?
                >
                > Many thanks
                >
                > Colin
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • steve pole
                I make a paste from 1/4 bees wax melted into 3/4 heated neatsfoot oil. ... From: Colin Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Linseed oil
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 16, 2010
                  I make a paste from 1/4 bees wax melted into 3/4 heated neatsfoot oil.

                  --- On Tue, 16/11/10, Colin <bigned@...> wrote:

                  From: Colin <bigned@...>
                  Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Linseed oil and leather
                  To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, 16 November, 2010, 21:08







                   









                  I use a 50% mix of olive oil and bees wax on my shoes and belts. It makes the leather lovely and supple.



                  I'm actually using the linseed oil on baked leather. My theory is that it will help to stiffen it further as it sets. I'm thinking that if this works, it might be how boiled leather was done. I know that Robin Wood dips his bowls into hot linsee oil to protect them. Would the same work for leather?



                  Best wishes



                  Colin



                  ----- Original Message -----

                  From: Edward DuBios

                  To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com

                  Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2010 7:29 AM

                  Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Linseed oil and leather



                  Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.



                  YIS

                  Master Edward DuBois

                  Duchy of Bisqaia

                  Adrian Empire



                  On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:



                  > I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with

                  > linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the

                  > leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else

                  > have any experience in this area?

                  >

                  > Many thanks

                  >

                  > Colin

                  >

                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • ren_junkie
                  Actually, no. The manager over at the nearest Tandy showed me how to use it to get better coverage. And if it s an oil dye, it ll work even better. I don t use
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 17, 2010
                    Actually, no. The manager over at the nearest Tandy showed me how to use it to get better coverage. And if it's an oil dye, it'll work even better.

                    I don't use it, cause it's an extra step and what I do works to my satisfaction already. Except for black. I hate dyeing things black. Maybe I should use it with the black.

                    Christopher

                    --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, steve pole <leathstitch@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Doesn't the neetsfoot stop the dye from penetrating the leather?
                    >
                    > On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 07:29 GMT Edward DuBios wrote:
                    >
                    > >Use Pure Neatsfoot Oil next time. Its a fine conditioner if used in moderation. I treat any leather I work with right after cutting my shape and before any carving or dyeing. Tandy Leather or tack shops should carry it.
                    > >
                    > >YIS
                    > >Master Edward DuBois
                    > >Duchy of Bisqaia
                    > >Adrian Empire
                    > >
                    > >On Nov 15, 2010, at 12:16, "Colin" <bigned@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >> I've been talking to someone rescently who said that he'd had problems with
                    > >> linseed oil and leather. I can see that there might be a problem with the
                    > >> leather getting stiff, but I wouldn't expect it to perish. Does anyone else
                    > >> have any experience in this area?
                    > >>
                    > >> Many thanks
                    > >>
                    > >> Colin
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                  • Ron Charlotte
                    ... That s the formula that I ve been using, give or take a bit. I mix it to the cold consistency of soft shoe polish, so my version is probably more 1/3 oil,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 17, 2010
                      At 04:52 PM 11/16/2010, Steve wrote:
                      >I make a paste from 1/4 bees wax melted into 3/4 heated neatsfoot oil.

                      That's the formula that I've been using, give or take a bit. I mix
                      it to the cold consistency of soft shoe polish, so my version is
                      probably more 1/3 oil, 2/3 wax. For stuff that gets sweated on/wet,
                      I add a few drops of the antifungal that I use for my roses (fungenix).

                      For something rigid, the linseed oil probably isn't much of an
                      issue. Using it on anything that's supposed to flex is a fair
                      certainty of cracking down the line.


                      Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                      ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
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