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binding stitch

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  • KenrickB
    Hi, I have a book on early medieval sheaths. The stitch on one particular example is called a binding stitch . From other descriptions in the book, I m taking
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 22, 2010
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      Hi,

      I have a book on early medieval sheaths. The stitch on one particular example is called a 'binding stitch'. From other descriptions in the book, I'm taking this to be kind of a tunnel stitch where one piece is laid on top of another where the stitches are only visible from one side (probably the side where the piece being attached is). What do you think?

      Kind of on the same subject, I've had trouble with getting a tunnel stitch such that it doesn't rip out the side of the leather. I'm guessing the leather I'm using may be too thin. Any tips on how to avoid this?
    • Filip De Clercq
      Hi, for tunnel-stitching I use an awl with curved blade, oval in cross section (not the diamond shape) After piercing, the thread is taken through the hole by
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 29, 2010
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        Hi,

        for tunnel-stitching I use an awl with curved blade, oval in cross section (not the diamond shape)
        After piercing, the thread is taken through the hole by means of a hog's bristle, slightly curved.
        You can also use the modern flexible needles or fishing-line.
        Always pull the thread tight in the same direction as you made the tunnel, so the thread is always "in line" with the hole.



        Filip



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: KenrickB




        Kind of on the same subject, I've had trouble with getting a tunnel stitch such that it doesn't rip out the side of the leather. I'm guessing the leather I'm using may be too thin. Any tips on how to avoid this?




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • steve pole
        I agree with kenrickB but I also advise sewing the leather dampened as the leather fibres will flex slightly when the awl is pushed through and not break as
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 29, 2010
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          I agree with kenrickB but I also advise sewing the leather dampened as the leather fibres will flex slightly when the awl is pushed through and not break as can happen when the leather is dry.
          I found this to be a good idea when making my own turnshoes. The passage of the awl though the leather can also be made easier by drawing the awl blade through bees wax before making the sewing hole.

          --- On Thu, 29/7/10, Filip De Clercq <filipdc@...> wrote:

          From: Filip De Clercq <filipdc@...>
          Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] binding stitch
          To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, 29 July, 2010, 13:05







           









          Hi,



          for tunnel-stitching I use an awl with curved blade, oval in cross section (not the diamond shape)

          After piercing, the thread is taken through the hole by means of a hog's bristle, slightly curved.

          You can also use the modern flexible needles or fishing-line.

          Always pull the thread tight in the same direction as you made the tunnel, so the thread is always "in line" with the hole.



          Filip



          ----- Original Message -----

          From: KenrickB



          Kind of on the same subject, I've had trouble with getting a tunnel stitch such that it doesn't rip out the side of the leather. I'm guessing the leather I'm using may be too thin. Any tips on how to avoid this?



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Filip De Clercq
          Hi Steve, Dampened the leather is a good trick. Beeswax will lubricate the awl indeed, but is not really necessary if you strop the awl. And it slows you
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 29, 2010
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            Hi Steve,

            Dampened the leather is a good trick.
            Beeswax will lubricate the awl indeed, but is not really necessary if you strop the awl.
            And it slows you down;-)

            The main reason I use the oval in cross section awl is you don't have to push it!
            The "point" is like a little blade.
            You just wiggle and the blade will cut his way through leather without effort.
            You have control over your action and lesser risk of ripping the leather.

            Filip


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: steve pole
            To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 3:07 PM
            Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] binding stitch



            I agree with kenrickB but I also advise sewing the leather dampened as the leather fibres will flex slightly when the awl is pushed through and not break as can happen when the leather is dry.
            I found this to be a good idea when making my own turnshoes. The passage of the awl though the leather can also be made easier by drawing the awl blade through bees wax before making the sewing hole.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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