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New Vinagaroon Question

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  • ren_junkie
    Do the leather pieces ever stop smelling like vinegar? For that would be awesome. Any way to maybe get it to stop? Storing it in a tupperware bin with a box
    Message 1 of 9 , May 8, 2010
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      Do the leather pieces ever stop smelling like vinegar? For that would be awesome.

      Any way to maybe get it to stop? Storing it in a tupperware bin with a box of baking soda maybe? Keeping them separate of course.

      Would there be any reaction if a dried piece was powdered with baking soda? hee hee....

      Thanks,
      Christopher
    • R Schooley
      I used the vingaroon to dye the Irish book satchel I made several years ago and ended up have to soak the pieces for the body of the bag so that I
      Message 2 of 9 , May 8, 2010
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        I used the vingaroon to dye the Irish book satchel I made several years ago and ended up have to soak the pieces for the body of the bag so that I could get the edges rolled in and sewn.  Those parts of the bag smell a lot less like vinegar, the smell isn't completely gone, but it's definitely much fainter than the strap which was not soaked.

        Rebecca




        ________________________________
        From: ren_junkie <ren_junkie@...>
        To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sat, May 8, 2010 2:32:32 PM
        Subject: [medieval-leather] New Vinagaroon Question

         
        Do the leather pieces ever stop smelling like vinegar? For that would be awesome.

        Any way to maybe get it to stop? Storing it in a tupperware bin with a box of baking soda maybe? Keeping them separate of course.

        Would there be any reaction if a dried piece was powdered with baking soda? hee hee....

        Thanks,
        Christopher







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ron Charlotte
        ... I ve done a couple of belts and bags with vinegar-iron, and the smell does fade after a while. I use a top dressing of neatsfoot oil and beeswax, and that
        Message 3 of 9 , May 8, 2010
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          At 04:32 PM 5/8/2010, Christopher wrote:
          >Do the leather pieces ever stop smelling like vinegar? For that
          >would be awesome.
          >
          >Any way to maybe get it to stop? Storing it in a tupperware bin with
          >a box of baking soda maybe? Keeping them separate of course.

          I've done a couple of belts and bags with vinegar-iron, and the smell
          does fade after a while. I use a top dressing of neatsfoot oil and
          beeswax, and that does seen to tone it down a bit (the slightly sweet
          sent of the wax and oil mix mixes with the vinegar scent to produce
          something reminiscent of a salad dressing, but it's better than the
          raw vinegar smell...)

          Basically, 4-6 weeks in, the odor is perceptible if you hold it to
          your nose, or when you first take it out of a closed container, but
          not at any distance that any person is likely to be putting their
          nose near your dress accessories.

          You could try the baking soda in the storage box, but I doubt it will
          speed up the process much.


          Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
          ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
        • ren_junkie
          Well, that s some help. Every little bit...lol My concern is making it for other people. For example, I make leather crowns. And I don t see them being a hot
          Message 4 of 9 , May 9, 2010
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            Well, that's some help. Every little bit...lol

            My concern is making it for other people. For example, I make leather crowns. And I don't see them being a hot item smelling like fishy pickles. And that's pretty close to the face, hence my concern. And I can't usually sit them out for a month to let it tone down. That's why I was looking for a quicker idea. So I guess I'll try the soaking thing, and see how that goes.

            Please tell me more about the top dressing you use. Ive always used spray on Saddle Lac or Super Sheen. I've recently started into using brush on Resoline, but I'm getting very inconsistent results. And it makes everything waaaaay darker. It's ok on black, but I had 2 pair of brown bracers just about turn black with Resoline. So, I'd be HUGELY interested in knowing more about your finish coat. Especially for belts and other need-to-be-super supple type items.

            Thanks,
            Christopher

            > I've done a couple of belts and bags with vinegar-iron, and the smell
            > does fade after a while. I use a top dressing of neatsfoot oil and
            > beeswax, and that does seen to tone it down a bit (the slightly sweet
            > sent of the wax and oil mix mixes with the vinegar scent to produce
            > something reminiscent of a salad dressing, but it's better than the
            > raw vinegar smell...)
            >
            > Basically, 4-6 weeks in, the odor is perceptible if you hold it to
            > your nose, or when you first take it out of a closed container, but
            > not at any distance that any person is likely to be putting their
            > nose near your dress accessories.
            >
            > You could try the baking soda in the storage box, but I doubt it will
            > speed up the process much.
            >
            >
            > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
            > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
            >
          • Diane Sawyer Dooley
            Mine s always stopped smelling like vinegar fairly quickly, but you could always try dipping it in a solution of baking soda and water. Tasha ... [Non-text
            Message 5 of 9 , May 9, 2010
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              Mine's always stopped smelling like vinegar fairly quickly, but you could always try dipping it in a solution of baking soda and water.

              Tasha



              >
              >From: ren_junkie <ren_junkie@...>
              >To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
              >Sent: Sat, May 8, 2010 4:32:32 PM
              >Subject: [medieval-leather] New Vinagaroon Question
              >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > >
              >>
              >
              >Do the leather pieces ever stop smelling like vinegar? For that would be awesome.
              >
              >>Any way to maybe get it to stop? Storing it in a tupperware bin with a box of baking soda maybe? Keeping them separate of course.
              >
              >>Would there be any reaction if a dried piece was powdered with baking soda? hee hee....
              >
              >>Thanks,
              >>Christopher
              >
              >
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ron Charlotte
              ... I take beeswax and melt it in a double boiler setup, and mix in enough neatsfoot oil for the cooled mixture to have the consistency of paste wax (I think
              Message 6 of 9 , May 9, 2010
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                At 01:26 PM 5/9/2010, Christopher wrote:
                >Well, that's some help. Every little bit...lol
                >
                >My concern is making it for other people. For example, I make
                >leather crowns. And I don't see them being a hot item smelling like
                >fishy pickles. And that's pretty close to the face, hence my
                >concern. And I can't usually sit them out for a month to let it tone
                >down. That's why I was looking for a quicker idea. So I guess I'll
                >try the soaking thing, and see how that goes.
                >
                >Please tell me more about the top dressing you use. Ive always used
                >spray on Saddle Lac or Super Sheen. I've recently started into using
                >brush on Resoline, but I'm getting very inconsistent results. And it
                >makes everything waaaaay darker. It's ok on black, but I had 2 pair
                >of brown bracers just about turn black with Resoline. So, I'd be
                >HUGELY interested in knowing more about your finish coat. Especially
                >for belts and other need-to-be-super supple type items.

                I take beeswax and melt it in a double boiler setup, and mix in
                enough neatsfoot oil for the cooled mixture to have the consistency
                of paste wax (I think it works out to about a fluid ounce of oil to
                6-8 ounces of wax). You can play with the proportions to get the
                consistency you like. I know a couple of people who make the same
                mix but to a more soft-serve ice cream level.

                I rub it in with a clean cloth, then I burnish it out with a firm
                buffing cloth (canvas weight).

                I use a version of the same mix with a little bit of agricultural
                antifungal mixed in (a few drops, per pound) to dress armoring leathers.

                You can use this on top of either oil or acrylic based sealers, as
                well. It's essentially home made neutral shoe polish, but it's that
                additional step to take when I'm trying to avoid modern
                products. It's a tweak on a leather dressing found in R. Reed's
                _Ancient Skins, Parchments, and Leathers_.


                Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
              • dougvl2002
                What is the antifungal called? That s something I could use for several purposes. What is it used on agriculturally? That would be a help in finding a source,
                Message 7 of 9 , May 9, 2010
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                  What is the antifungal called? That's something I could use for several purposes.
                  What is it used on agriculturally? That would be a help in finding a source, asking for it in a local farm supply store.

                  Thanks!

                  Doug

                  --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Ron Charlotte <ronch2@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > At 01:26 PM 5/9/2010, Christopher wrote:
                  > >Well, that's some help. Every little bit...lol
                  snip
                  >
                  > I take beeswax and melt it in a double boiler setup, and mix in
                  > enough neatsfoot oil for the cooled mixture to have the consistency
                  > of paste wax (I think it works out to about a fluid ounce of oil to
                  > 6-8 ounces of wax). You can play with the proportions to get the
                  > consistency you like. I know a couple of people who make the same
                  > mix but to a more soft-serve ice cream level.
                  >
                  > I rub it in with a clean cloth, then I burnish it out with a firm
                  > buffing cloth (canvas weight).
                  >
                  > I use a version of the same mix with a little bit of agricultural
                  > antifungal mixed in (a few drops, per pound) to dress armoring leathers.
                  >
                  > You can use this on top of either oil or acrylic based sealers, as
                  > well. It's essentially home made neutral shoe polish, but it's that
                  > additional step to take when I'm trying to avoid modern
                  > products. It's a tweak on a leather dressing found in R. Reed's
                  > _Ancient Skins, Parchments, and Leathers_.
                  >
                  >
                  > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                  > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
                  >
                • ren_junkie
                  Sweet. I should be able to do that. After we re moved and unpacked. Thanks! Christopher
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 12, 2010
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                    Sweet. I should be able to do that. After we're moved and unpacked.

                    Thanks!

                    Christopher

                    >
                    > I take beeswax and melt it in a double boiler setup, and mix in
                    > enough neatsfoot oil for the cooled mixture to have the consistency
                    > of paste wax (I think it works out to about a fluid ounce of oil to
                    > 6-8 ounces of wax). You can play with the proportions to get the
                    > consistency you like. I know a couple of people who make the same
                    > mix but to a more soft-serve ice cream level.
                    >
                    > I rub it in with a clean cloth, then I burnish it out with a firm
                    > buffing cloth (canvas weight).
                    >
                    > I use a version of the same mix with a little bit of agricultural
                    > antifungal mixed in (a few drops, per pound) to dress armoring leathers.
                    >
                    > You can use this on top of either oil or acrylic based sealers, as
                    > well. It's essentially home made neutral shoe polish, but it's that
                    > additional step to take when I'm trying to avoid modern
                    > products. It's a tweak on a leather dressing found in R. Reed's
                    > _Ancient Skins, Parchments, and Leathers_.
                    >
                    >
                    > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                    > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
                    >
                  • dougvl2002
                    Could you describe the agricultural antifungal you use? Who makes it, or what s its name/ Where do you get it - maybe a farm supply store? What size
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 15, 2010
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                      Could you describe the 'agricultural antifungal' you use?
                      Who makes it, or what's its name/ Where do you get it - maybe a farm supply store? What size container does it come in? Hopefully small.

                      I'd like to find something like this for mold and mildew prevention and remediation, on leather and other products too.

                      Thanks!

                      Doug

                      --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Ron Charlotte <ronch2@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > At 01:26 PM 5/9/2010, Christopher wrote:
                      > >Well, that's some help. Every little bit...lol
                      > >
                      > >My concern is making it for other people. For example, I make
                      > >leather crowns. And I don't see them being a hot item smelling like
                      > >fishy pickles. And that's pretty close to the face, hence my
                      > >concern. And I can't usually sit them out for a month to let it tone
                      > >down. That's why I was looking for a quicker idea. So I guess I'll
                      > >try the soaking thing, and see how that goes.
                      > >
                      > >Please tell me more about the top dressing you use. Ive always used
                      > >spray on Saddle Lac or Super Sheen. I've recently started into using
                      > >brush on Resoline, but I'm getting very inconsistent results. And it
                      > >makes everything waaaaay darker. It's ok on black, but I had 2 pair
                      > >of brown bracers just about turn black with Resoline. So, I'd be
                      > >HUGELY interested in knowing more about your finish coat. Especially
                      > >for belts and other need-to-be-super supple type items.
                      >
                      > I take beeswax and melt it in a double boiler setup, and mix in
                      > enough neatsfoot oil for the cooled mixture to have the consistency
                      > of paste wax (I think it works out to about a fluid ounce of oil to
                      > 6-8 ounces of wax). You can play with the proportions to get the
                      > consistency you like. I know a couple of people who make the same
                      > mix but to a more soft-serve ice cream level.
                      >
                      > I rub it in with a clean cloth, then I burnish it out with a firm
                      > buffing cloth (canvas weight).
                      >
                      > I use a version of the same mix with a little bit of agricultural
                      > antifungal mixed in (a few drops, per pound) to dress armoring leathers.
                      >
                      > You can use this on top of either oil or acrylic based sealers, as
                      > well. It's essentially home made neutral shoe polish, but it's that
                      > additional step to take when I'm trying to avoid modern
                      > products. It's a tweak on a leather dressing found in R. Reed's
                      > _Ancient Skins, Parchments, and Leathers_.
                      >
                      >
                      > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
                      > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
                      >
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