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Re: [medieval-leather] Re: Sheath construction...

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  • Michael Parker
    Also, Seth, what about ways of finishing the leather. Was it treated with bees wax or anything like that to seal it? ... [Non-text portions of this message
    Message 1 of 56 , Apr 22 4:57 PM
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      Also, Seth, what about ways of finishing the leather. Was it treated with
      bees wax or anything like that to seal it?

      On Thu, Apr 22, 2010 at 7:39 PM, legviiii <legviiii@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com<medieval-leather%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > "sethrun_magaoinghous" <sethrun.magaoinghous@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > ... Dyes are a modern invention but do make a nice modern way to decorate
      > the sheath...
      >
      > > Seth
      > >
      >
      > Seth, can you please expand a bit on this statement? I thought the
      > Stonyhurst Gospels binding c AD650 showed evidence of both dye and paint.
      >
      > Wayne
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Henry Plouse
      Wow, let me add my thanks to Lucy Rose s - I happen to have several projects which need some painting on them and I was a tad worried about relying on my usual
      Message 56 of 56 , Jul 26, 2010
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        Wow, let me add my thanks to Lucy Rose's - I happen to have several projects
        which need some painting on them and I was a tad worried about relying on my
        usual acrylic paints.  This is just what I need. 

        I might note that, based on your recommendation, I "Googled" Angelus Acrylic
        Leather Paint and found a couple sites which appear to offer better selections
        and deals than the others (incl. a 12 color "starter kit" for around $29.00 or
        $29.95).   "Manhatten Wardrobe Supply", www.wardrobesupplies.com, is the
        cheapest, while "Shoe Shine Express", www.shoeshineexpress.com, is a hair
        pricier, but has a lot better selection (incl. applicator pens for fine line
        work).

        Any purveyors you like or recommend?

        YOS,
        ALRIC



        ________________________________
        From: Leslie Cox <lucyrosefalconer@...>
        To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, July 26, 2010 7:31:41 PM
        Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Leather Paint.

        Thanks for that paint recommendation; found a website, marked it, will try
        soon.  Apparently you aren't the only one who likes them, and I hadn't found
        them until now.

        Smiles, Lucy Rose Falconer



        On Thu, Apr 22, 2010 at 11:56 AM, Gemma Evangelista Borgia <
        archerygirl108@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > The BEST leather paint by far is Angelus brand Acrylic Leather Paint. You
        > will not be disappointed. Seal it with their sealer also. I can't say enough
        > about this leather paint and I have tried them all. It will not wear or
        > crack like regular acrylic paint, it actually binds to the leather and just
        > doesn't "float" on top.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Gemma
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: "babiemine@... <babiemine%40aol.com>"
        ><babiemine@...<babiemine%40aol.com>
        > >
        > To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com <medieval-leather%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Thu, April 22, 2010 5:57:56 AM
        > Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Sheath construction...
        >
        > On another topic,
        >
        > Any recommendations for leather paint?
        >
        > Want to use it on a Norman Sword Belt/Scabbard.
        >
        > Daffyd the Taylor
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Karl Christensen <konrmac@yahoo. com>
        > To: medieval-leather@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Thu, Apr 22, 2010 8:14 am
        > Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Sheath construction. ..
        >
        > Another source is (Medieval Finds from Excavations in London:1) "Knives and
        > Scabbards", by J. Cowgill, M. deNeergaard and N. Griffiths. 1987 Museum of
        > London series.
        > ISBN: 0-11-290440.
        > I found it to be very helpful on a few sheaths and scabbards I have done
        > for others. Some are in remarkably good shape and show how intricately
        > decorated these scabbards were.
        >
        > YIS, and in leather,
        >
        > konr
        > Stagsgate, Meridies (used to be from An Tir)
        >
        > --- On Thu, 4/22/10, Henry Plouse <ozymandias1951@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        >
        > From: Henry Plouse <ozymandias1951@ yahoo.com>
        > Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Sheath construction. ..
        > To: medieval-leather@ yahoogroups. com
        > Date: Thursday, April 22, 2010, 12:26 AM
        >
        > Regrettably, we don't have a lot of exemplars left from the period, but in
        > those cases where the materials have been preserved (such as in some of the
        > bog deposits), sheath construction is pretty much the same as modern
        > constructions - that is to say that there is a shaped wood core usually with
        > a leather or hide wrap. It also appears that the inside of the sheath may
        > also have had a shearling lining - the fur/wool prevents moisture on the
        > blade and the lanolin likewise protects the blade. Early blades hung from a
        > scabbard slide and that style persisted throughout the Migration Period and
        > into the Viking Period, before being displaced by other styles. Some of the
        > Eastern groups (Goths, Gepids and the early Rus) probably adopted the
        > Sassanian Persian style with two attached ring mounts on the upper side of
        > the scabbard from which the scabbard would hang from the belt. To judge from
        > finds like Nydam, Sutton Hoo, and the Staffordshire Hoard, metal
        > furniture was common - throat, chape, and one or more reinforcing rings,
        > along with purely decorative elements (highly decorative, to judge from the
        > Staffordshire finds). The scabbard slide could be metal, bone, wood, ivory,
        > etc. A good source for SOME of that furniture (chapes and slides) is
        > Mercia-Sveiter. I've found it almost impossible to find pre-cast throat
        > pieces, but you can probably fabricate it from sheet brass or bronze.
        >
        > Hope that helps.
        >
        > YOS,
        > ALRIC (Glyn Dwfn/An Tir)
        >
        > ____________ _________ _________ __
        > From: Michael Parker <ArchAngel13@ gmail.com>
        > To: medieval-leather@ yahoogroups. com
        > Sent: Wed, April 21, 2010 5:44:15 PM
        > Subject: [medieval-leather] Sheath construction. ..
        >
        > Greetings all,
        >
        > I have a question or three for those with much more specialized
        > knowledge than I. I make knives primarily replicating Scandinavian
        > and Anglo Saxon blades from roughly 500AD - 1200AD and would like to
        > make my scabbards more historically accurate.
        >
        > Question one: Does anyone have any resources they can pass on
        > regarding the proper design and construction methods for this region
        > and time period?
        >
        > Question two: How would the leather be treated or finished? Were they
        > rubbed with bee's wax to seal them? Anything?
        >
        > Thank you very much for your time,
        > Michael
        > aka Valinn
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >

        >


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