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Sword Scabard

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  • Colin
    Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval scabard? I m wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis). I figure that with the
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 22, 2008
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      Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis). I figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider than many modern scabards.

      Many thanks

      Colin

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carowyn Silveroak
      Greetings, Only Tibetan ones - at the Oriental Arms & Armor exhibit at the Met in NYC. I have the book, if you want some pics taken & sent, but not European
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 22, 2008
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        Greetings,

        Only Tibetan ones - at the Oriental Arms & Armor exhibit at the Met in
        NYC. I have the book, if you want some pics taken & sent, but not
        European ones.

        -Carowyn

        > Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval
        > scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis).
        > I figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider
        > than many modern scabards.
        ____________________________________________________________
        Click here for free information on nursing degrees, up to $150/hour
        http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/Ioyw6i3nEnla2xt6TBYCdbICSjIWEQL42yfe6IOrozUHzwjt8IlXxH/
      • Sethrun Magaoinghous
        Yes add 2 to 3 mm of wood on each side. There are several good books available too. The RIA just published one on Irish finds and Several are available from
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 22, 2008
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          Yes add 2 to 3 mm of wood on each side. There are several good books
          available too. The RIA just published one on Irish finds and Several are
          available from England. I dont have the isbns with me.
          Seth




          --
          Trí labra ata ferr túa: ochán ríg do chath, sreth immais, molad iar lúag.
          Three speeches that are better than silence: inciting a king to
          battle,spreading knowledge, praise after reward.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Timothy Park
          Remind me if you don t hear from me in a few days ... Somewhere I have photos I took at the Royal Armory (Leeds, UK) and there were a few scabards there as I
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 22, 2008
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            Remind me if you don't hear from me in a few days ...

            Somewhere I have photos I took at the Royal Armory (Leeds, UK) and there
            were a few scabards there as I recall. If I can find them I'll scan and
            post. Regrettably, for some reason, they wouldn't let me close enough to
            put a ruler in for scale. ;) Cheeky fellows.

            Might need a poke, but I need to dig those out and scan then for another
            purpose.

            Timothy the Blacksmith
            (who tends to make things that go in scabards)

            Carowyn Silveroak wrote:
            >
            >
            > Greetings,
            >
            > Only Tibetan ones - at the Oriental Arms & Armor exhibit at the Met in
            > NYC. I have the book, if you want some pics taken & sent, but not
            > European ones.
            >
            > -Carowyn
            >
            > > Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval
            > > scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis).
            > > I figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider
            > > than many modern scabards.
            > __________________________________________________________
            > Click here for free information on nursing degrees, up to $150/hour
            > http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/Ioyw6i3nEnla2xt6TBYCdbICSjIWEQL42yfe6IOrozUHzwjt8IlXxH/
            > <http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/Ioyw6i3nEnla2xt6TBYCdbICSjIWEQL42yfe6IOrozUHzwjt8IlXxH/>
            >
            >
          • Henry Plouse
            I have had a chance to look (unfortunately, not close enough to handle) some ancient scabbards, retrieved from German/Danish bogs.  I saw no obvious
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 22, 2008
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              I have had a chance to look (unfortunately, not close enough to handle) some ancient scabbards, retrieved from German/Danish bogs.  I saw no obvious difference between their sizes/dimensions and modern replicas, then again, given their age and the circumstances of their burial/preservation, it's possible that the wood parts could either have swollen or shrunk and it's impossible to tell (except that, where there is associated furniture, it doesn't show any obvious disparity with the wood's dimensions).  I have, however, actually seen and handled a number of ancient and medieval scabbard furniture pieces (throats, chapes, etc.) and I saw no reason to believe that they were significantly different from a modern scabbard for a similarly sized and shaped sword.  Certainly, I can think of no technical reason why they would be so distinguished - wood is wood and our ancestors were more than capable woodworkers and could easily shave down a piece to an
              incredible thinness while still retaining its strength.  Indeed, given the availability of high quality, old growth wood, I'd imagine that they could actually turn out even thinner, stronger pieces than we can with our much less dense woods. 
               
              The main difference I saw was in the means of mounting the scabbard or hanging it from the belt or baldric.  Unlike us, with our modern reliance on frogs, most of the exemplars I've seen (whether in person or in pictures) had some integral mounting mechanism. 
               
              YOS,
              ALRIC, Glyn Dwfn. 

              --- On Fri, 8/22/08, Timothy Park <park.ta@...> wrote:

              From: Timothy Park <park.ta@...>
              Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Sword Scabard
              To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, August 22, 2008, 7:01 PM






              Remind me if you don't hear from me in a few days ...

              Somewhere I have photos I took at the Royal Armory (Leeds, UK) and there
              were a few scabards there as I recall. If I can find them I'll scan and
              post. Regrettably, for some reason, they wouldn't let me close enough to
              put a ruler in for scale. ;) Cheeky fellows.

              Might need a poke, but I need to dig those out and scan then for another
              purpose.

              Timothy the Blacksmith
              (who tends to make things that go in scabards)

              Carowyn Silveroak wrote:
              >
              >
              > Greetings,
              >
              > Only Tibetan ones - at the Oriental Arms & Armor exhibit at the Met in
              > NYC. I have the book, if you want some pics taken & sent, but not
              > European ones.
              >
              > -Carowyn
              >
              > > Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval
              > > scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis).
              > > I figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider
              > > than many modern scabards.
              > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
              > Click here for free information on nursing degrees, up to $150/hour
              > http://thirdpartyof fers.juno. com/TGL2141/ fc/Ioyw6i3nEnla2 xt6TBYCdbICSjIWE QL42yfe6IOrozUHz wjt8IlXxH/
              > <http://thirdpartyof fers.juno. com/TGL2141/ fc/Ioyw6i3nEnla2 xt6TBYCdbICSjIWE QL42yfe6IOrozUHz wjt8IlXxH/>
              >
              >

















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Griffin de Stokeport
              Several links and threads of some reproduction work that folks have done that I ve read on various sites:
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 23, 2008
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                Several links and threads of some reproduction work that folks have done
                that I've read on various sites:

                http://forums.armourarchive.org/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=651082&highlight=#651082

                Here's a thread I bookmarked awhile ago. The quality and workmanship is
                amazing.

                http://forums.swordforum.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=70438

                There's also this:

                http://www.mron.org/The_making_of_a_14th_century_scabbard.pdf




                Colin wrote:
                >
                > Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval
                > scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis). I
                > figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider than
                > many modern
                >
                > : 8/22/2008 6:48 AM
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Henry Plouse
                May I also recommend the following site:   www.templ.net   Not only does this Czech sword maker create MAGNIFICENT blades (based on, but not copies of
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 23, 2008
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                  May I also recommend the following site:
                   
                  www.templ.net
                   
                  Not only does this Czech sword maker create MAGNIFICENT blades (based on, but not copies of historical exemplars), but the accompanying scabbards, in addition to being historically accurate, are to die for.
                   
                  As soon as I win the lottery, I'm buying every thing he's ever made...
                   
                  YOS,
                  ALRIC, Glyn Dwfn.

                  --- On Sat, 8/23/08, Griffin de Stokeport <griffin@...> wrote:

                  From: Griffin de Stokeport <griffin@...>
                  Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Sword Scabard
                  To: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Saturday, August 23, 2008, 11:01 AM






                  Several links and threads of some reproduction work that folks have done
                  that I've read on various sites:

                  http://forums. armourarchive. org/phpBB2/ viewtopic. php?p=651082& highlight= #651082

                  Here's a thread I bookmarked awhile ago. The quality and workmanship is
                  amazing.

                  http://forums. swordforum. com/showthread. php?s=&threadid= 70438

                  There's also this:

                  http://www.mron. org/The_making_ of_a_14th_ century_scabbard .pdf

                  Colin wrote:
                  >
                  > Has anyone on here been able to stufy closely an original medieval
                  > scabard? I'm wondering how thick they are (on the most narrow axis). I
                  > figure that with the wooden core, they must be quite a bit wider than
                  > many modern
                  >
                  > : 8/22/2008 6:48 AM
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Sethrun Magaoinghous
                  Great links. Send me an email if you want a copy of the documentation I have on my scabbard I made for a 10th c sword.The bibilo has a few good links too. Seth
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 24, 2008
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                    Great links. Send me an email if you want a copy of the documentation I have
                    on my scabbard I made for a 10th c sword.The bibilo has a few good links
                    too.
                    Seth
                    --
                    Trí labra ata ferr túa: ochán ríg do chath, sreth immais, molad iar lúag.
                    Three speeches that are better than silence: inciting a king to
                    battle,spreading knowledge, praise after reward.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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