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Re:New Guy

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  • The Dudleys
    Greetings Antonio, You have to differentiate between actually branding the leather (as with a soldering iron) and heating the stamps just enough to darken the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 25, 2008
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      Greetings Antonio,

      You have to differentiate between actually branding the leather (as with a
      soldering iron) and heating the stamps just enough to darken the
      leather. Branding has been around as long as there's been a piece of
      leather and a glowing stick from the fire. As an art form called
      "pyrogravure", it got popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries,
      and there is a certain case to be made for its use much earlier.

      What you really want to look at, and there is a good deal of documentation
      and period examples of it, is heating the stamps enough to darken the
      impression. This is a very old process and is how all those wonderfully
      ornamented book covers from antiquity were made. Heating negates the need
      to case the leather (wet it), and is exactly what you need when you have a
      sewn book, because you ornament it after you've bound it.

      The nice thing is, this particular leather art is alive and well in the
      world of antiquarian book restoration and hand book binding. These people
      ornament leather exactly as it was done before Herr Gutenberg and his
      press. Two companies and at least one freelance engraver/machinist in
      Britain still make the stamps, and there must be a couple thousand
      available. A good percentage of these are historically accurate, and they
      will do custom work if you just happen to have an antique book you need to
      match for restoration. The stamps are brass with wooden handles and have
      incredible detail, which makes them pricey. They start at about ten times
      what a basic Tandy-Leather Factory stamp costs. Occasionally, you can get
      a good deal on eBay. Search "bookbinding" and "bookbinding tool", but make
      sure you use the advanced option to search "Worldwide" because most book
      binding stamps are in Britain and Europe. And don't forget exchange rates
      - they bite! You'll also find books on the subject there, but they too
      can be pricey. There is one CD commonly available on historical leather
      ornamentation that has hundreds of excellent photographs of museum quality
      book covers. Sells under eBay tag "americanhistorybuff". There is another
      CD of antique books about bookbinding. Your mileage will vary on that
      one. Sells under name "Euriskodata Inc." but will usually give you
      multiple hits under "bookbinding" search.

      The nicest thing about heating is it will work on any stamp that won't
      melt. My experimenting shows that the temp of boiling water is about
      minimum to add some darkening to what simple pressure will give
      you. Actual bookbinding stamp "stoves" come in gas and electric and are
      outrageous ($400). Originally they used coal or charcoal. I cheat and use
      an old laboratory hot plate so I can regulate the temp (also eBay). Temp
      is simply a matter of experimentation starting about 225 F. If you smoke
      it, your branding. Wooden handles are nice and are easy to make for
      American stamps. File handles work. The closest to historical bookbinding
      patterns among the cased leather stamps are Midas (Kelly, NZ). They have a
      steel handle and a machined brass head. They also had a "K" or "HK" series
      that was highly detailed and stainless steel. "Had" as in out of business
      for thirty years. Yep, eBay again. St. Louis Leather Stamp is an
      excellent source for out of print stamps. Seller is harpsyjones and a good
      guy to do business with. Also check his store for solid metal type
      blocks. He's had some nice heraldic pieces that work well on
      leather. Some patience (and small fingers) required.

      Misc: Bookbinding stamps will work on cased veg tan but you have to
      develop a technique. Their fine detail seems to respond to simple hand
      pressure better than a mallet tap.

      Heated stamps are the only way I've found to stamp non-veg tan
      (mineral/chrome, oil, combo, latigos of unknown parentage) with any hope of
      success.

      Resources:

      http://www.finecut.co.uk/bookbinding/
      Fine Cut Graphic Imaging - This URL is a site search, so don't worry about
      "Page Not Found". They use a wide screen, so scroll to the right on each
      page for menu. E-catalog - They have their stamps separated by century!

      http://www.pandsengraving.co.uk/index.asp
      P&S Engraving - Paper catalog but their web page is pure eye candy for
      leather stampers. Their small rolls with interchangeable wheels go far
      beyond Osborne's.

      http://www.garnock.co.uk/
      Tom McEwan - Scottish engraver/machinest. Sells only on eBay.uk at this
      point. You'll find him by searching bookbinding tool and Worldwide. Or
      use his eBay tag, "gnkbooks". Beautiful stamps - I have half a dozen with
      one on order. Great to do business with! All of his eBay ads are purest
      eye candy and an incitement to stamp lust. He usually has half a dozen ads
      a week.

      http://www.hooleworks.com/
      Hoole Machine and Engraving - American, does large diameter book roll
      stamps for those infinite borders and long sword scabbards.

      Good luck and best regards,

      Friedrich Breckner
      mka Doug Dudley
      Favour Leather Works
    • antonio_di_giordani
      WOW, that was very cool. I was thinking about putting a design on a pouch,with an iron. But heat stamping sounds good too. -- In
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 25, 2008
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        WOW, that was very cool. I was thinking about putting a design on a
        pouch,with an iron. But heat stamping sounds good too.
        -- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, The Dudleys <favour@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Greetings Antonio,
        >
        > You have to differentiate between actually branding the leather
        (as with a
        > soldering iron) and heating the stamps just enough to darken the
        > leather. Branding has been around as long as there's been a piece
        of
        > leather and a glowing stick from the fire. As an art form called
        > "pyrogravure", it got popular in the late 19th and early 20th
        centuries,
        > and there is a certain case to be made for its use much earlier.
        >
        > What you really want to look at, and there is a good deal of
        documentation
        > and period examples of it, is heating the stamps enough to darken
        the
        > impression. This is a very old process and is how all those
        wonderfully
        > ornamented book covers from antiquity were made. Heating negates
        the need
        > to case the leather (wet it), and is exactly what you need when
        you have a
        > sewn book, because you ornament it after you've bound it.
        >
        > The nice thing is, this particular leather art is alive and well
        in the
        > world of antiquarian book restoration and hand book binding.
        These people
        > ornament leather exactly as it was done before Herr Gutenberg and
        his
        > press. Two companies and at least one freelance
        engraver/machinist in
        > Britain still make the stamps, and there must be a couple thousand
        > available. A good percentage of these are historically accurate,
        and they
        > will do custom work if you just happen to have an antique book you
        need to
        > match for restoration. The stamps are brass with wooden handles
        and have
        > incredible detail, which makes them pricey. They start at about
        ten times
        > what a basic Tandy-Leather Factory stamp costs. Occasionally, you
        can get
        > a good deal on eBay. Search "bookbinding" and "bookbinding tool",
        but make
        > sure you use the advanced option to search "Worldwide" because
        most book
        > binding stamps are in Britain and Europe. And don't forget
        exchange rates
        > - they bite! You'll also find books on the subject there, but
        they too
        > can be pricey. There is one CD commonly available on historical
        leather
        > ornamentation that has hundreds of excellent photographs of museum
        quality
        > book covers. Sells under eBay tag "americanhistorybuff". There
        is another
        > CD of antique books about bookbinding. Your mileage will vary on
        that
        > one. Sells under name "Euriskodata Inc." but will usually give
        you
        > multiple hits under "bookbinding" search.
        >
        > The nicest thing about heating is it will work on any stamp that
        won't
        > melt. My experimenting shows that the temp of boiling water is
        about
        > minimum to add some darkening to what simple pressure will give
        > you. Actual bookbinding stamp "stoves" come in gas and electric
        and are
        > outrageous ($400). Originally they used coal or charcoal. I
        cheat and use
        > an old laboratory hot plate so I can regulate the temp (also
        eBay). Temp
        > is simply a matter of experimentation starting about 225 F. If
        you smoke
        > it, your branding. Wooden handles are nice and are easy to make
        for
        > American stamps. File handles work. The closest to historical
        bookbinding
        > patterns among the cased leather stamps are Midas (Kelly, NZ).
        They have a
        > steel handle and a machined brass head. They also had a "K"
        or "HK" series
        > that was highly detailed and stainless steel. "Had" as in out of
        business
        > for thirty years. Yep, eBay again. St. Louis Leather Stamp is an
        > excellent source for out of print stamps. Seller is harpsyjones
        and a good
        > guy to do business with. Also check his store for solid metal
        type
        > blocks. He's had some nice heraldic pieces that work well on
        > leather. Some patience (and small fingers) required.
        >
        > Misc: Bookbinding stamps will work on cased veg tan but you have
        to
        > develop a technique. Their fine detail seems to respond to simple
        hand
        > pressure better than a mallet tap.
        >
        > Heated stamps are the only way I've found to stamp non-veg tan
        > (mineral/chrome, oil, combo, latigos of unknown parentage) with
        any hope of
        > success.
        >
        > Resources:
        >
        > http://www.finecut.co.uk/bookbinding/
        > Fine Cut Graphic Imaging - This URL is a site search, so don't
        worry about
        > "Page Not Found". They use a wide screen, so scroll to the right
        on each
        > page for menu. E-catalog - They have their stamps separated by
        century!
        >
        > http://www.pandsengraving.co.uk/index.asp
        > P&S Engraving - Paper catalog but their web page is pure eye candy
        for
        > leather stampers. Their small rolls with interchangeable wheels
        go far
        > beyond Osborne's.
        >
        > http://www.garnock.co.uk/
        > Tom McEwan - Scottish engraver/machinest. Sells only on eBay.uk
        at this
        > point. You'll find him by searching bookbinding tool and
        Worldwide. Or
        > use his eBay tag, "gnkbooks". Beautiful stamps - I have half a
        dozen with
        > one on order. Great to do business with! All of his eBay ads are
        purest
        > eye candy and an incitement to stamp lust. He usually has half a
        dozen ads
        > a week.
        >
        > http://www.hooleworks.com/
        > Hoole Machine and Engraving - American, does large diameter book
        roll
        > stamps for those infinite borders and long sword scabbards.
        >
        > Good luck and best regards,
        >
        > Friedrich Breckner
        > mka Doug Dudley
        > Favour Leather Works
        >
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