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  • antonio_di_giordani
    I am new to leathercrafting. I want to make a pair of bracers. What is the best way to get them to hold a shape?
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 23, 2008
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      I am new to leathercrafting. I want to make a pair of bracers. What is
      the best way to get them to hold a shape?
    • Christopher J
      Welcome.   Unless you plan on using them as armour, they don t need to hold shape. They ll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle them on. Latigo
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 24, 2008
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        Welcome.
         
        Unless you plan on using them as armour, they don't need to hold shape. They'll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle them on. Latigo is great for bracers. If you want to stamp or tool some pretty designs into your leather, you'll want to use veg tan. If it's just as a fashion accessory, even the veg should be light enough to be flexible. Use a belt weight leather, regardless of what type of leather you use.
         
        Now if you're doing armour (vambraces), go with veg. After  you cut it, make it wet. you can soak it or use a spray bottle to just dampen it. Either works, but you want to wait until the leather looks almost dry (it darkens when wet), but it still needs to feel cool to the touch. Then, you roll it into the shape you want. You can use the laces or straps to hold it that way either on or off your arm. If you do it on your arms, it will shape exactly to the shape of your arms. You can also do this with the lighter not-armour bracers, but only in veg. Latigo isn't responsive to wet-forming.
         
        And if you want it really hard, used the soak method, follow the directions, and then put them on a foil-lined cookie sheet in your oven at about 180 degrees, and check every 15 minutes until hard. Let them sit out a couple days to completely air dry (if you bake them totally dry, you'll have burnt spots, and those points will be weak).
         
        But for just regular costume bracers, they don't need to hold any shape after cutting. Eventually they will just from use, but you don't need to go out of your way to shape them.
         
        Hope this helps,
        Christopher




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • antonio_di_giordani
        Thanks, that helped a great bit. Can I tool on Latigo? ... shape. They ll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle them on. Latigo is great for
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 24, 2008
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          Thanks, that helped a great bit. Can I tool on Latigo?

          --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Christopher J
          <ren_junkie@...> wrote:
          >
          > Welcome.
          >  
          > Unless you plan on using them as armour, they don't need to hold
          shape. They'll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle
          them on. Latigo is great for bracers. If you want to stamp or tool
          some pretty designs into your leather, you'll want to use veg tan.
          If it's just as a fashion accessory, even the veg should be light
          enough to be flexible. Use a belt weight leather, regardless of what
          type of leather you use.
          >  
          > Now if you're doing armour (vambraces), go with veg. After  you
          cut it, make it wet. you can soak it or use a spray bottle to just
          dampen it. Either works, but you want to wait until the leather
          looks almost dry (it darkens when wet), but it still needs to feel
          cool to the touch. Then, you roll it into the shape you want. You
          can use the laces or straps to hold it that way either on or off
          your arm. If you do it on your arms, it will shape exactly to the
          shape of your arms. You can also do this with the lighter not-armour
          bracers, but only in veg. Latigo isn't responsive to wet-forming.
          >  
          > And if you want it really hard, used the soak method, follow the
          directions, and then put them on a foil-lined cookie sheet in your
          oven at about 180 degrees, and check every 15 minutes until hard.
          Let them sit out a couple days to completely air dry (if you bake
          them totally dry, you'll have burnt spots, and those points will be
          weak).
          >  
          > But for just regular costume bracers, they don't need to hold any
          shape after cutting. Eventually they will just from use, but you
          don't need to go out of your way to shape them.
          >  
          > Hope this helps,
          > Christopher
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Copernicus Skygazer
          Not really, no. Veg tan is the best for that. You can always tool a thin piece of veg tan and sew it onto the latigo for decoration, YIS, Phillipos the Skeptic
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 24, 2008
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            Not really, no. Veg tan is the best for that. You can always tool a thin
            piece of veg tan and sew it onto the latigo for decoration,
            YIS,
            Phillipos the Skeptic

            On Tue, 24 Jun 2008, antonio_di_giordani wrote:

            > Thanks, that helped a great bit. Can I tool on Latigo?
            >
            > --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Christopher J
            > <ren_junkie@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Welcome.
            >>  
            >> Unless you plan on using them as armour, they don't need to hold
            > shape. They'll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle
            > them on. Latigo is great for bracers. If you want to stamp or tool
            > some pretty designs into your leather, you'll want to use veg tan.
            > If it's just as a fashion accessory, even the veg should be light
            > enough to be flexible. Use a belt weight leather, regardless of what
            > type of leather you use.
            >>  
            >> Now if you're doing armour (vambraces), go with veg. After  you
            > cut it, make it wet. you can soak it or use a spray bottle to just
            > dampen it. Either works, but you want to wait until the leather
            > looks almost dry (it darkens when wet), but it still needs to feel
            > cool to the touch. Then, you roll it into the shape you want. You
            > can use the laces or straps to hold it that way either on or off
            > your arm. If you do it on your arms, it will shape exactly to the
            > shape of your arms. You can also do this with the lighter not-armour
            > bracers, but only in veg. Latigo isn't responsive to wet-forming.
            >>  
            >> And if you want it really hard, used the soak method, follow the
            > directions, and then put them on a foil-lined cookie sheet in your
            > oven at about 180 degrees, and check every 15 minutes until hard.
            > Let them sit out a couple days to completely air dry (if you bake
            > them totally dry, you'll have burnt spots, and those points will be
            > weak).
            >>  
            >> But for just regular costume bracers, they don't need to hold any
            > shape after cutting. Eventually they will just from use, but you
            > don't need to go out of your way to shape them.
            >>  
            >> Hope this helps,
            >> Christopher
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • antonio_di_giordani
            One last question(for now). I am doing a litle bit of tooling. But have seen some bracer,bags, and even armor that has been branded. Is that a period
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 24, 2008
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              One last question(for now). I am doing a litle bit of tooling. But
              have seen some bracer,bags, and even armor that has been branded. Is
              that a period technique?

              --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Copernicus Skygazer
              <muck@...> wrote:
              >
              > Not really, no. Veg tan is the best for that. You can always tool
              a thin
              > piece of veg tan and sew it onto the latigo for decoration,
              > YIS,
              > Phillipos the Skeptic
              >
              > On Tue, 24 Jun 2008, antonio_di_giordani wrote:
              >
              > > Thanks, that helped a great bit. Can I tool on Latigo?
              > >
              > > --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Christopher J
              > > <ren_junkie@> wrote:
              > >>
              > >> Welcome.
              > >>  
              > >> Unless you plan on using them as armour, they don't need to hold
              > > shape. They'll just flex right into place when you lace or buckle
              > > them on. Latigo is great for bracers. If you want to stamp or
              tool
              > > some pretty designs into your leather, you'll want to use veg
              tan.
              > > If it's just as a fashion accessory, even the veg should be light
              > > enough to be flexible. Use a belt weight leather, regardless of
              what
              > > type of leather you use.
              > >>  
              > >> Now if you're doing armour (vambraces), go with veg. After  you
              > > cut it, make it wet. you can soak it or use a spray bottle to
              just
              > > dampen it. Either works, but you want to wait until the leather
              > > looks almost dry (it darkens when wet), but it still needs to
              feel
              > > cool to the touch. Then, you roll it into the shape you want. You
              > > can use the laces or straps to hold it that way either on or off
              > > your arm. If you do it on your arms, it will shape exactly to the
              > > shape of your arms. You can also do this with the lighter not-
              armour
              > > bracers, but only in veg. Latigo isn't responsive to wet-forming.
              > >>  
              > >> And if you want it really hard, used the soak method, follow the
              > > directions, and then put them on a foil-lined cookie sheet in
              your
              > > oven at about 180 degrees, and check every 15 minutes until hard.
              > > Let them sit out a couple days to completely air dry (if you bake
              > > them totally dry, you'll have burnt spots, and those points will
              be
              > > weak).
              > >>  
              > >> But for just regular costume bracers, they don't need to hold
              any
              > > shape after cutting. Eventually they will just from use, but you
              > > don't need to go out of your way to shape them.
              > >>  
              > >> Hope this helps,
              > >> Christopher
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ------------------------------------
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Christopher J
              Well, the decorative stamping in book binding is done hot (according to the Binder at Colonial Williamsburg), but that isn t really a brand. It s a hot stamp
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 26, 2008
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                Well, the decorative stamping in book binding is done hot (according to the Binder at Colonial Williamsburg), but that isn't really a brand. It's a hot stamp into damp leather. Veg tan, again. I wouldn't doubt that pyrography was used in period, tho.
                 
                If you want to decorate latigo, get a woodburning kit. It sears just fine. Just make sure you buy a good kit. I think I was told copper heads rather than brass heads work better on hide.
                 
                Christopher




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • antonio_di_giordani
                Thanks for the help. I have a copper tiped woodburning kit, I was going to try it. I di not expect all this help, thanks alot. -- In
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 26, 2008
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                  Thanks for the help. I have a copper tiped woodburning kit, I was
                  going to try it. I di not expect all this help, thanks alot.
                  -- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Christopher J
                  <ren_junkie@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Well, the decorative stamping in book binding is done hot
                  (according to the Binder at Colonial Williamsburg), but that isn't
                  really a brand. It's a hot stamp into damp leather. Veg tan, again.
                  I wouldn't doubt that pyrography was used in period, tho.
                  >  
                  > If you want to decorate latigo, get a woodburning kit. It sears
                  just fine. Just make sure you buy a good kit. I think I was told
                  copper heads rather than brass heads work better on hide.
                  >  
                  > Christopher
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Christopher J
                  No problem. That s why we re here.   Christopher [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 27, 2008
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                    No problem. That's why we're here.
                     
                    Christopher




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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