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Re: Help: Leather Thimble

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  • witheapfionn
    Thank you for taking the time to reply to my questions. What you wrote confirms what I have gathered from what I have been finding online. This is my first
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 16, 2007
      Thank you for taking the time to reply to my questions.
      What you wrote confirms what I have gathered from what I
      have been finding online.

      This is my first time entering a competitive A&S challenge,
      so it is mostly just a test run, and practice for next year most
      likely. Therefore I'm not that concerned about the thimble being
      an item that may have been spur of the moment in period.

      I have come to the same conclusions though, that metal was much
      preferred, and that any leather thimbles either disintegrated and/or
      degraded, or have been misidentified.

      Thanks again for your time, I appreciate it.
      Withe

      --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Ron Charlotte <ronch2@...> wrote:
      >
      > At 10:59 AM 11/15/2007, you wrote:
      > >Greetings Good Gentles,
      > >
      > >I'm new to this group.
      > >I've been experimenting with leather work (mostly assembly and pattern
      > >making), but am still not very good. Lack of consistent practice, I'm
      > >sure.
      > >
      > >I recently made a leather thimble to cushion my thumb when carving
      > >bone. This weekend I'm entering our kingdom A&S Pentathlon
      > >competition, and I'm looking for help on something.
      > >
      > >Specifically, references to (or extant examples of!) leather thimbles.
      >
      > Hmm, that's a tough one. I've got good references to thimbles in
      > various metals, horn, bone, and ivory, A leather one, while quick
      > and cheap to make, is one of those things that probably wouldn't
      > survive, or even be recognized as what it is. I've often taken a
      > scrap and made various forms when I was having a fight with things
      > like using a glover's needle on leather that turned out to be tougher
      > than expected.
      >
      > You can look up "stitching palm", but really thimbles are so easy to
      > make from the smallest bit's of metal, that very few would have made
      > a leather one for anything other than a momentary need, in my opinion
      > (and as best as research has shown me).
      >
      >
      > al Thaalibi ---- An Crosaire, Trimaris
      > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
      > ronch2@... or afn03234@...
      >
    • Gregory G. Stapleton
      If they had something like this, in period, for the purpose you are using yours for, it would probably have been made of soft lead. Look for examples of
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 2, 2007
        If they had something like this, in period, for the purpose you are
        using yours for, it would probably have been made of soft lead. Look
        for examples of period stitching palms. In your documentation, state
        that you have found lead examples of leather stitching palms and that
        you would conjecture a similar use for a thumb thimble to protect the
        carver.

        Gregory G. Stapleton

        --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, "witheapfionn"
        <organismism@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you for taking the time to reply to my questions.
        > What you wrote confirms what I have gathered from what I
        > have been finding online.
        >
        > This is my first time entering a competitive A&S challenge,
        > so it is mostly just a test run, and practice for next year most
        > likely. Therefore I'm not that concerned about the thimble being
        > an item that may have been spur of the moment in period.
        >
        > I have come to the same conclusions though, that metal was much
        > preferred, and that any leather thimbles either disintegrated and/or
        > degraded, or have been misidentified.
        >
        > Thanks again for your time, I appreciate it.
        > Withe
        >
        <snipage>
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