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Re: [medieval-leather] Gallery10: Viking finds

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  • Saint Phlip
    ... Funny- and here I thought they looked rather like box cutters ;-) -- Saint Phlip Heat it up Hit it hard Repent as necessary. Has anyone seen my temper? I
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
      On 11/14/06, Anna Troy <owly3@...> wrote:
      > The blades look exactly like certain types of chip
      > carving and Sami horn carving blades...
      >
      > Anna T

      Funny- and here I thought they looked rather like box cutters ;-)

      --
      Saint Phlip

      Heat it up
      Hit it hard
      Repent as necessary.

      Has anyone seen my temper?
      I seem to have misplaced it at Stalag XXXV....
    • Susan Fox
      ... With all respect, good Magister, I do not see that this blade swivels. It looks to me as if
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
        Master Magnus writes:

        > The Canterbury Viking Age Swivel Knife with large
        > and small blades.
        > <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm
        <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm>>

        With all respect, good Magister, I do not see that this blade swivels.
        It looks to me as if the tang runs straight throughout and is bolted to
        the bone handles at the "pommel" end and the "quillion" end, if there
        were any quillions, that is, just before the business end of the blade
        is exposed.

        Also, I do not see "large and small blades." I only see one example in
        four views. Is there another larger or smaller knife? I should like to
        show these to my local bladesmiths, to be sure!

        Yours in service,
        Dame Selene Colfox, OP, OLC, etc.
        selene@...
      • Leslie Cox
        I also note that we have no sense of scale, but I find no further info at the link, darn it! It would appear that the sharp edge was not the angled edge, as
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
          I also note that we have no sense of scale, but I find no further info at
          the link, darn it! It would appear that the sharp edge was not the angled
          edge, as it would be with a "swivel" knife also, by looking at the four
          views.

          I'd like to know how big this is. My husband says there is a viking age
          folding knife about 8" long when closed either in this collection or a
          similar one.

          -- Lucy Rose Falconer



          -----Original Message-----
          From: medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of mmagnusol
          Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2006 12:49 AM
          To: - Historic-HornAntlerBone; - Manx; - Medieval Leather List; -
          Metallum_Lochac; - EKMetalsmiths
          Subject: [medieval-leather] Gallery10: Viking finds


          The Canterbury Viking Age Swivel Knife with large
          and small blades.
          <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm>






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mmagnusol
          ... Saxe knives that I have seen have whittle tangs, short or long. The best book I know of about Saxe/Sax/Seax knives in Europe is: OLSÉN, Pår : Die Saxe
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
            David Horvath wrote:

            >
            >
            > Cool! I always thought these were just really short sax blades (ie with the
            > cutting edge being the longest one). I didn't know that the cutting edge
            > was actually on the sloping portion of the blade.
            >
            > YIS Tarrach
            >

            Saxe knives that I have seen have whittle tangs,
            short or long.

            The best book I know of about Saxe/Sax/Seax knives
            in Europe is:
            OLSÉN, Pår : Die Saxe von Valsgärde I.
            Valsgärdestudien II. Acta Musei Antiquatuatum.
            Septentrion. Regiae Universitatis Upsaliensis III.
            Uppsala Universitets Museum, 1945.
            Almqvist and Wiksell Boktryckeri A-B, Ejnar
            Munksgaard, Kobenhavn/Copenhagen.
            Ill. 4:o 124 pp in German, plus 25 plates, 371
            illustrations, 5 page bibliography.
            Large number of Saxe and sheath depictions,
            including belt
            fittings, sheath fittings, handle decorations,
            carvings, related items from other
            cultures stretching from western Europe to
            Persia. Some decorated sword handles are
            also presented. Valsgarde is a large
            pre-scandinavian cemetery of about 5-700.
            The weapons depicted come from not only
            Valsgarde, where some warriors were
            apparently buried with two saxes and one sword,
            but also from other cultures by comparison.
            Saxe, Seax, or Sax weapons are from the size of
            small knives up to the size of small swords.
            Generally Anglo-Saxon ones had an angular clip
            pointed blade and a straight edge.
            Scandinavian tend to have a more curved back and
            sometimes a curved edge.
            The decoration of the sheaths often involves both
            woodcarving and decorated metalwork.

            Magnus
          • mmagnusol
            ... Let your imagination loose. ________________________________________________ / ___ ___ / / | | O | O | / O
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 14, 2006
              Susan Fox wrote:

              >
              >
              > Master Magnus writes:
              >
              > > The Canterbury Viking Age Swivel Knife with large
              > > and small blades.
              > > <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm
              > <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm>
              > <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm
              > <http://www.canterburytrust.co.uk/schools/gallery/gall10.htm>>>
              >
              > With all respect, good Magister, I do not see that this blade swivels.

              Let your imagination loose.


              ________________________________________________
              / ___ ___
              /
              / | | O | O |

              / O
              /_________| \___/
              |_____________________________/
              edge Pivot stop edge
              rivet at end

              This is how they work. Handle scales not drawn in.

              Only in this example the scales, or sides of the
              handle, move enough to
              wedge one or the other blade into it's side.

              > It looks to me as if the tang runs straight throughout and is bolted to
              > the bone handles at the "pommel" end and the "quillion" end, if there
              > were any quillions, that is, just before the business end of the blade
              > is exposed.
              >
              > Also, I do not see "large and small blades." I only see one example in
              > four views. Is there another larger or smaller knife? I should like to
              > show these to my local bladesmiths, to be sure!

              Rusted into the handle. Break that thing and kiss
              your career byebye.
              There are probably twenty or so of the blades in
              various books I have.
              They mostly show up in areas that had Viking trade
              or presence.
              This is the only one I know of with a handle survival.
              Plus it happens to be a jewel of a design.
              The Mammen style wasn't based on anything more
              complicated than
              this.

              I have a three or four of the actual period single
              bladed pivot knives.
              The metal below the pivot on the edge side is
              usually thin and almost
              similar to the blade.. This seems to change on
              the more complex
              knives of the late Renaissnce and later periods.
              I have several of those
              things.

              Magnus

              > Yours in service,
              > Dame Selene Colfox, OP, OLC, etc.
              > selene@... <mailto:selene%40earthlink.net>
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