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Need help with heel cup

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  • kringskeep@optonline.net
    OK - I ve finally decided to work on my prototype footwear. Now I have a problem - due to excessive sideways foot roll I need a hard (-ish) heel cup,
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 5, 2006
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      OK -

      I've finally decided to work on my prototype footwear. Now I have a problem - due to excessive sideways foot 'roll' I need a hard (-ish) heel cup, otherwise I end up 'walking' on the side of the shoe and not on the heel.

      I have the heavy leather, and I understand how to put it in. BUT - how big to make it??

      I want to make it a little higher (at the center back) than the 'ball' of my heel. Do I make the 'width' of the cup piece from just in front of the ankle bone to center back - doubled? or do I make it narrower than that.

      I have Shoes and Pattens, but they don't tell me how big the piece is - just what the pieces look like and how they were stiched together.

      And to top it off I want to wear these to Pennsic.... Yeah, my timing needs help.

      Katheryne
    • steve
      ... a problem - due to excessive sideways foot roll I need a hard (- ish) heel cup, otherwise I end up walking on the side of the shoe and not on the heel.
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 13, 2006
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        --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, kringskeep@... wrote:
        >
        > OK -
        >
        > I've finally decided to work on my prototype footwear. Now I have
        a problem - due to excessive sideways foot 'roll' I need a hard (-
        ish) heel cup, otherwise I end up 'walking' on the side of the shoe
        and not on the heel.
        >
        > I have the heavy leather, and I understand how to put it in. BUT -
        how big to make it??
        >
        > I want to make it a little higher (at the center back) than
        the 'ball' of my heel. Do I make the 'width' of the cup piece from
        just in front of the ankle bone to center back - doubled? or do I
        make it narrower than that.
        >
        > I have Shoes and Pattens, but they don't tell me how big the piece
        is - just what the pieces look like and how they were stiched
        together.

        I made some shoes many years ago for someone with the same problem.
        I made the cup by blocking some thickish leather into the shape of
        the persons heel so that it was comfortable (like a bowl). It
        covered the ankle entirely to give the support that was wanted. The
        cup was then scived down around the edges to remove any 'step' and
        then it was glued into place.
        >
        > And to top it off I want to wear these to Pennsic.... Yeah, my
        timing needs help.
        >
        > Katheryne
        >
      • steve pole
        I made some shoes many years ago for someone with the same problem. I made the cup by blocking some thickish leather into the shape of the persons heel so that
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 13, 2006
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          I made some shoes many years ago for someone with the same problem.
          I made the cup by blocking some thickish leather into the shape of
          the persons heel so that it was comfortable (like a bowl). It
          covered the ankle entirely to give the support that was wanted. The
          cup was then scived down around the edges to remove any 'step' and
          then it was glued into place.

          the last post looked confusing, so i have posted it again.
          steve




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        • Katheryne of Krings Keep
          ... I m back - I wore these shoes for most of Pennsic. WOW! I didn t realize how much a properly fitted set of heels makes all the difference. Usually I have
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 20, 2006
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            --- "steve" <leathstitch@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- kringskeep@ wrote:
            > > I've finally decided to work on my prototype footwear. Now I have
            > a problem - due to excessive sideways foot 'roll' I need a hard (-
            > ish) heel cup, otherwise I end up 'walking' on the side of the shoe
            > and not on the heel.
            > >
            > > I want to make it a little higher (at the center back) than
            > the 'ball' of my heel. Do I make the 'width' of the cup piece from
            > just in front of the ankle bone to center back - doubled? or do I
            > make it narrower than that.


            > I made some shoes many years ago for someone with the same problem.
            > I made the cup by blocking some thickish leather into the shape of
            > the persons heel so that it was comfortable (like a bowl). It
            > covered the ankle entirely to give the support that was wanted. The
            > cup was then scived down around the edges to remove any 'step' and
            > then it was glued into place.


            I'm back -

            I wore these shoes for most of Pennsic. WOW! I didn't realize how
            much a properly fitted set of heels makes all the difference.

            Usually I have to change shoes every other day because of heel pain
            or my arches hurt, the balls of my feet are sore, or some such. These
            actually became more comfortable as War went on.
            The only problem that came up - was that somehow the shoe stretched
            from heel to toe. It grew about 1" <huh?> Whn they were new they fit
            like a second skin.
            I wore them in the rain, in the dirt, over rocks and asphalt. What
            was the mixture that caused the stretching? Because they were
            prototypes that I expected 'blow-out' and have to be repaired, I used
            thin garment leather for the sole.

            The heel cup was 1/4" thick leather - and after 2 days it was already
            molding to my feet. <umm WOW!! again>

            Katheryne
            who can't wait to make the final shoes !!
          • Al Muckart
            On Monday 21 August 2006 11:55, Katheryne of Krings Keep wrote: Hi Katheryne, ... That s probably a good part of your problem there. I would guess that
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 20, 2006
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              On Monday 21 August 2006 11:55, Katheryne of Krings Keep wrote:

              Hi Katheryne,

              > The only problem that came up - was that somehow the shoe stretched
              > from heel to toe. It grew about 1" <huh?> Whn they were new they fit
              > like a second skin.
              > I wore them in the rain, in the dirt, over rocks and asphalt. What
              > was the mixture that caused the stretching? Because they were
              > prototypes that I expected 'blow-out' and have to be repaired, I used
              > thin garment leather for the sole.

              That's probably a good part of your problem there. I would guess that combined
              with water and wearing would be the cause of your stretching. A thick sole
              won't stretch lengthways as much and will help your shoe hold it's shape much
              better. Were they tight around your toes as well as over your instep? If so
              that may well have contributed to the stretching.

              > The heel cup was 1/4" thick leather - and after 2 days it was already
              > molding to my feet. <umm WOW!! again>

              If you have a good pattern and use veg tanned leather the whole shoe will do
              this if worn damp just after turning. Do this once and then grease it well to
              keep more water out and you should have something pretty comfy.

              --
              Al
              http://where.else.net.nz
            • Thomas Thurman
              ... I also tend to find a natural stretch in the leather running from the back of the animal to the belly. I would place the length of the sole running from
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 21, 2006
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                > On Monday 21 August 2006 11:55, Katheryne of Krings Keep wrote:

                >> The only problem that came up - was that somehow the shoe stretched
                >> from heel to toe. It grew about 1" <huh?> Whn they were new they fit
                >> like a second skin.
                >> I wore them in the rain, in the dirt, over rocks and asphalt. What
                >> was the mixture that caused the stretching? Because they were
                >> prototypes that I expected 'blow-out' and have to be repaired, I used
                >> thin garment leather for the sole.

                Al responded:

                >
                > That's probably a good part of your problem there. I would guess that
                > combined
                > with water and wearing would be the cause of your stretching. A thick sole
                > won't stretch lengthways as much and will help your shoe hold it's shape
                > much
                > better. Were they tight around your toes as well as over your instep? If
                > so
                > that may well have contributed to the stretching.

                I also tend to find a natural stretch in the leather running from the back
                of the animal to the belly. I would place the length of the sole running
                from the tail to the neck or just use a piece of shoulder leather where
                stretch isn't as natural a part of the animal. I would also hammer the
                soles to compress the leather which also takes out quite a bit of the
                stretch. I have had some 10 oz veg-tan soles stretch about an 1" or so
                after wearing them soaked and after learning this have not had the same
                problem ever again.

                Brian
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