Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [medieval-leather] Digest Number 1407

Expand Messages
  • michael tartaglio
    Hi. A modeling spoon is, in my recollection, a bone device that has, at one end, a spoon bowl shaped portion for burnishing and depressing, and the other
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 6, 2005
      Hi. A modeling spoon is, in my recollection, a bone device that has, at
      one end, a spoon bowl shaped portion for burnishing and depressing, and
      the other shaped like a round spoon handle with either a rounded or
      sharp end, again useful for burnishing and impressing. I think some
      folks that work in calligraphy and illumination use them to put down
      gold leaf and such. Along with a slicker and some other specialized
      tools, these can be probably also made or purchased in a number of other
      materials. My wife inherited from her father his stamps (early to late
      20th Cent. leatherstamping tools), many of which are dead ringers for
      some stamp styles found on extant leather items The chapter on
      leatherworking by John Cherry in English Medieval Industries has illos
      of some extant leatherworking tools. Good Luck, Mike T.


      >
      >
    • Ron Charlotte
      ... There have been a lot of variants on modeling spoons/burnishers made from anything from brass to polished stone. It s something of a chicken or egg
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 7, 2005
        At 09:57 PM 12/6/2005, you wrote:
        >Hi. A modeling spoon is, in my recollection, a bone device that has, at
        >one end, a spoon bowl shaped portion for burnishing and depressing, and
        >the other shaped like a round spoon handle with either a rounded or
        >sharp end, again useful for burnishing and impressing.

        There have been a lot of variants on modeling spoons/burnishers made from
        anything from brass to polished stone. It's something of a chicken or egg
        question as to which craft had them first. The bone folder tool, for
        example, probably started as a book binders tool, but that's just my opinion.

        Bone ones do work, but are breakable, brass or bronze is a bit more common
        historically for leather tools, as iron, of course, marks wet leather.


        Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
        ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.