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Re: [medieval-leather] Discoloured leather

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  • Ron Charlotte
    ... Oxalic Acid, sold in hardware stores as wood bleach. Optionally, dye it a solid, darker color. Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL ronch2@bellsouth.net OR
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 12 5:36 PM
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      At 06:08 AM 7/10/2005, Phil wrote:
      >Gentlefolk
      >
      >I have some veg tanned leather that is discoloured (unevenly) due to
      >exposure to the sun.
      >
      >Is there any way to remedy this please?

      Oxalic Acid, sold in hardware stores as wood bleach. Optionally, dye it a
      solid, darker color.


      Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
      ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
    • khailil1180@sbcglobal.net
      Or you could put back out in the sun. Give it an all over tan. ... From: Ron Charlotte To: Sent:
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 12 5:49 PM
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        Or you could put back out in the sun. Give it an all over tan.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Ron Charlotte" <ronch2@...>
        To: <medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, July 12, 2005 7:36 PM
        Subject: Re: [medieval-leather] Discoloured leather


        > At 06:08 AM 7/10/2005, Phil wrote:
        >>Gentlefolk
        >>
        >>I have some veg tanned leather that is discoloured (unevenly) due to
        >>exposure to the sun.
        >>
        >>Is there any way to remedy this please?
        >
        > Oxalic Acid, sold in hardware stores as wood bleach. Optionally, dye it a
        > solid, darker color.
        >
        >
        > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
        > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • rmhowe
        ... Ron, I know you may well be the smartest person on list but I would caution anyone about using oxalic acid without a really good chemical mask and goggles,
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 27 5:19 AM
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          Ron Charlotte wrote:

          > At 06:08 AM 7/10/2005, Phil wrote:
          >
          >>Gentlefolk
          >>
          >>I have some veg tanned leather that is discoloured (unevenly) due to
          >>exposure to the sun.
          >>
          >>Is there any way to remedy this please?
          >
          >
          > Oxalic Acid, sold in hardware stores as wood bleach. Optionally, dye it a
          > solid, darker color.
          >
          >
          > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
          > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...

          Ron, I know you may well be the smartest person on list but I would
          caution anyone about using oxalic acid without a really good
          chemical mask and goggles, gloves, apron, etc.

          My last year gainfully employed I and the rest of the shop at the
          university were treated to a wonderful experience.

          Some moron in the Chemistry department who was most immediately fired
          blew up an experiment involving nearly all the expensive commercially
          made cabinets in his lab room. They were originally finished blonde.
          Now they had lovely black streaks and spots. Being cheap, and thinking
          there was an easy fix for that mess they decided we had to bleach it
          out as opposed to making new doors. I guess there were at least 40.
          The carpenters dragged them in. I never saw the lab or the faceframes
          myself. But I wondered about it.

          I knew about oxalic acid as wood bleach and we applied it as per box
          instructions, and it sort of did a little. When we went to sand it
          off after it dried it reconverted to acid in our bodily breathing
          apparati. We were wearing masks too. What we needed instead was
          something akin to a full body suit with a chemical respirator.

          It actually cost us more not to make new doors and I don't think
          anyone in that shop wanted to repeat the experience. It never did
          fix the doors at all well.

          For that particular eight years I was the head cabinetmaker, which
          as I performed it had very many facets. Very much the top woodworking
          position on a campus of 40,000+. I had studied industrial arts ed
          there many years before. When they converted the I.A. Department to
          technical education and all the old professors had quit they had to
          request me to fix what was left of my old department's equipment.
          I'd say they have less than a quarter now of what they did when I
          studied there and I really don't think the technical education
          department [which is what they call it now] is a patch on the ass
          of my old one. I disabled working for the university.
          Neuromuscular disease. I was going to give them a LOT of hand tools
          when I drop off the twig but they'll go to the crafts centers now.
          I have books and tools for about thirty crafts/trades here.
          Thousands of them. Been buying them for over 30 years.

          Magnus
        • Ron Charlotte
          ... I m not especially bright, but I will admit to having worked with various acids and caustics for most of my adult life, so I reflexively take a lot of
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 27 3:30 PM
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            At 08:19 AM 7/27/2005, Magnus wrote:
            > >>Is there any way to remedy this please?
            > >
            > >
            > > Oxalic Acid, sold in hardware stores as wood bleach. Optionally, dye it a
            > > solid, darker color.
            > >
            > >
            > > Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
            > > ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
            >
            >Ron, I know you may well be the smartest person on list but I would
            >caution anyone about using oxalic acid without a really good
            >chemical mask and goggles, gloves, apron, etc.
            >
            >My last year gainfully employed I and the rest of the shop at the
            >university were treated to a wonderful experience.
            >
            >Some moron in the Chemistry department who was most immediately fired
            >blew up an experiment involving nearly all the expensive commercially
            >made cabinets in his lab room. They were originally finished blonde.
            >Now they had lovely black streaks and spots. Being cheap, and thinking
            >there was an easy fix for that mess they decided we had to bleach it
            >out as opposed to making new doors. I guess there were at least 40.
            >The carpenters dragged them in. I never saw the lab or the faceframes
            >myself. But I wondered about it.
            >
            >I knew about oxalic acid as wood bleach and we applied it as per box
            >instructions, and it sort of did a little. When we went to sand it
            >off after it dried it reconverted to acid in our bodily breathing
            >apparati. We were wearing masks too. What we needed instead was
            >something akin to a full body suit with a chemical respirator.
            >
            ><deletia>

            I'm not especially bright, but I will admit to having worked with various
            acids and caustics for most of my adult life, so I reflexively take a lot
            of precautions as a matter of course.

            I have a sneaking suspicion that what got you was less the wood bleach,
            than the reaction of it with whatever stained the cabinetry (most of the
            chemicals I can think of that would leave permanent black staining on wood
            qualify as "bad to breath" as a dust). That's not taking into account any
            other chemicals those surfaces had been exposed to, without leaving a stain.

            That said:
            Another method for evening discolored leather that I didn't mention because
            I haven't used it in awhile, is hair dresser's peroxide. You have to be
            careful with the stuff, because it's a bit trickier to neutralize in
            leather, but it's a gentler chemical (relatively speaking).


            Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
            ronch2@... OR afn03234@...
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