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Re: [medieval-leather] veg-tan shoes

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  • William Stephenson
    Jon - I h use a stitch length of 5-6 mm for closing the side seams and attaching the soles on medieval type footwear without any problem of tear out on 4-5 oz
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 11, 2005
      Jon -

      I h use a stitch length of 5-6 mm for closing the side seams and
      attaching the soles on medieval type footwear without any problem of
      tear out on 4-5 oz veg tanned cow and calf. So, if you work carefully
      it should not be a problem. I usually leave the bottom of the side
      closing seam unfinished until I trim off the lasting margin.

      Liam
      On Apr 10, 2005, at 11:44 PM, Jonathan Getty wrote:

      >
      > I'm planning on making my next pair of turnshoes from veg-tanned
      > leather, but am somewhat worried that the stitching and lasting strings
      > will tear out if the leather is wet-stretched over the last. Any
      > thoughts on this? I haven't had this problem with chrome tanned shoes,
      > but I'm sort of expecting it with veg.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jon
    • Jonathan Getty
      ... wrong :) ... The way I learned to stretch leather over a last, you pull the leather around the last with pliers, but hold it in place by punching holes in
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
        > If your stitches tear out, that's a really good clue you've done them
        wrong :)

        > What do you mean by lasting strings?

        The way I learned to stretch leather over a last, you pull the leather around the last with pliers, but hold it in place by punching holes in the lasting margin and lacing across the "sole" of the last to tension the vamp in place while stretching and drying. With chrome tan, the holes in the margin occasionally tear out, which is a sign I made them too close to the edge. Since I've learned the hard way that veg-tan gets weaker when wet, I'm concerned I'll have more of a problem with the string tearing out the holes.

        Jon
      • William Stephenson
        Jon If you allow enough lasting margin and make your lacing holes close to the feather edge of the last, you should not have a tear out problem with veg
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
          Jon
          If you allow enough "lasting margin" and make your "lacing" holes close
          to the "feather edge" of the last, you should not have a tear out
          problem with veg tanned leather.

          Liam

          On Apr 12, 2005, at 8:50 AM, Jonathan Getty wrote:

          > The way I learned to stretch leather over a last, you pull the leather
          > around the last with pliers, but hold it in place by punching holes in
          > the lasting margin and lacing across the "sole" of the last to tension
          > the vamp in place while stretching and drying. With chrome tan, the
          > holes in the margin occasionally tear out, which is a sign I made them
          > too close to the edge. Since I've learned the hard way that veg-tan
          > gets weaker when wet, I'm concerned I'll have more of a problem with
          > the string tearing out the holes.
          >
          > Jon
        • Marc Carlson
          ... Hmm. This is one of those cases where I wish this wasn t all by email. For instance I find wet vegetable tanned leather stronger and more maleable for
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
            --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Jonathan Getty <beans@m...>
            wrote:
            >...them too close to the edge. Since I've learned the hard way that
            >veg-tan gets weaker when wet, I'm concerned I'll have more of a
            >problem with the string tearing out the holes.

            Hmm. This is one of those cases where I wish this wasn't all by
            email. For instance I find wet vegetable tanned leather stronger and
            more maleable for stitching. Which means either that we're doing
            some minor thing differently, or we're using different sorts of leather.

            Marc
          • lerxst1@comcast.net
            Does anyone have any step by step pictures or drawings showing how to turn the shoe? I think I know basicly what you are talking about but seeing it would
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
              Does anyone have any step by step pictures or drawings showing how to turn the shoe?

              I think I know basicly what you are talking about but seeing it would probably make it easer

              Bret


              >
              >
              > --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, Jonathan Getty <beans@m...>
              > wrote:
              > >...them too close to the edge. Since I've learned the hard way that
              > >veg-tan gets weaker when wet, I'm concerned I'll have more of a
              > >problem with the string tearing out the holes.
              >
              > Hmm. This is one of those cases where I wish this wasn't all by
              > email. For instance I find wet vegetable tanned leather stronger and
              > more maleable for stitching. Which means either that we're doing
              > some minor thing differently, or we're using different sorts of leather.
              >
              > Marc
              >
              >
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              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
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            • Marc Carlson
              ... turn the shoe? http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/MAKING/Shmking1.htm AND
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 12, 2005
                --- In medieval-leather@yahoogroups.com, lerxst1@c... wrote:
                > Does anyone have any step by step pictures or drawings showing how to
                turn the shoe?

                http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe/MAKING/Shmking1.htm

                AND

                http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-carlson/shoe2/shoeproject1.htm

                If those don't ansewr your question, please let me know.

                Marc
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