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Dr Graves pats himself on the back deservedly

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  • Joe F
    Clinical lectures By Robert James Graves
    Message 1 of 1 , May 7, 2010
      Clinical lectures By Robert James Graves

      http://books.google.com/books?printsec=frontcover&dq=robert%20graves%20lectures&sig=8qptcZovmpnXwWOTc_KrO8DM5Hw&ei=dSHkS8fYLoGClAeu5bH-AQ&ct=result&id=MJg-AAAAYAAJ&ots=Ts1veGkXPo&output=text&pg=PA137

      LECTURE XI.
      General account of the spotted fever epidemic in Dublin, in 1834-5 —
      Its most remarkable features — Insidious character — Further
      explanation of the reasoning which led Dr. Graves to the discovery of
      the utility of tartar emetic in its latter stages — Dr. Nolan's
      remarkable case of enteritis, with collapse, cured by enormous doses
      of opium — Cases of singular proportions between the frequency of the
      pulse and of respiration — Case of acute cesophagitis.

      When the latter and dangerous period of the fever was accompanied by
      the former nervous group of symptoms alone, they yielded to wine,
      musk, porter, and opiates; but when the symptoms indicating cerebral
      congestion were superadded, then it was that the case assumed so great
      and striking a similarity, so far as the functions of the nervous
      system were concerned, to the well-known variety of delirium tremens
      accompanied by cerebral congestion, — to that variety of delirium
      tremens, in fact, which can only be successfully treated by the
      judicious but bold exhibition of tartar emetic combined with
      laudanum.* It is Ike discovery of the utility of this practice in the
      advanced stages of spotted fevers, that 1 claim peculiarly as my own;
      for there is not, in the writing of any author on the subject, the
      slightest trace of such a method of treatment to be found. As this
      method has manifestly saved many, many lives, under a combination of
      circumstances apparently hopeless, I cannot avoid congratulating
      myself upon being the first to propose a practice which has not only
      diminished the rate of our hospital mortalityf in a remarkable manner,
      but has been the means of saving many of my friends and pupils; for,
      without its adoption, our class at the Meath Hospital would hjve been
      more than decimated, whereas at present we have to regret the loss of
      but one pupil.
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