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Final Mix/Freq.Spectrum Analyzers

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    After 3 months of fooling around with my MC-505,I realized that the patches of MC-505 do not sound very transparent when they are blended together and sent to
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 30, 2001
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      After 3 months of fooling around with my MC-505,I
      realized that the patches of MC-505 do not sound very
      transparent when they are blended together and sent to
      the mix out, while my song is playing.
      I realized that I have more control over the sound of
      individual patches (+ drum notes) if I resample the
      sound of each track in my sequencer (I allocate one
      track for each drum note/group), using appropriate and
      different EQ and EFX for each of them (..thus overcome
      the limitation of having just 1 EFX besides Reverb and
      Delay). At the end, I get wavfiles (or SP-808 phrases)
      that are min. 1, max 32 bars. The rest is brickwork,
      which is mixed down into a stereo audio track.
      Now that's better!!
      I can hear the detail of every nuance, texture and
      build-up in my songs.
      So.....what's next??
      I know that there is no magic formula for making a
      perfect mix but people talk about the necessity to
      test your final mix in different locations and set-ups
      ranging from transistor portables with 2" mono
      speakers to club systems with 5000W sub-woofers.
      Hmmmmm....
      Is there an easier way?
      Do Frequency Spectrum Analyzers (hardware or
      software)help? Where do they enter? Here??
      What are some basic/rule-of-the-thumb things that we
      all should know...and how and when we should use this
      tool?
      Expert members!! Please stand up and teach us
      novices!!

      Thanks in advance for any comments/links on this
      important issue.


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    • erik_magrini@Baxter.com
      Try using Steinberg s Freefilter if you have access to DX or VST plugins. It allows you to analyse the frequency spectrum of a track and apply those settings
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2001
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        Try using Steinberg's Freefilter if you have access to DX or VST plugins.  It allows you to analyse the frequency spectrum of a track and apply those settings to your own music.  Not always worth the time, but it can provide you with a good visual representation of a properly mixed song's frequency spread.

        Alas the only way to bypass listening tests on multiple systems is to REALLY know your monitors so well that you already know how your songs will translate on other systems.  So in effect, no there is no way to get around that.  Let me know if you've got any particular questions about mixing, I'd be glad to help!

        rEalm




        I know that there is no magic formula for making a perfect mix but people talk about the necessity to test your final mix in different locations and set-ups ranging from transistor portables with 2" mono speakers to club systems with 5000W sub-woofers. Hmmmmm....

        Is there an easier way? Do Frequency Spectrum Analyzers (hardware or software)help?  Expert members!! Please stand up and teach us novices!!

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