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Re: propane hotrod - THE H.A.M.B.

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  • briankk
    FWIW, Jalopy Journal set of my virus program.. said they were sending me a trojan horse.. bk ________________________________ From: hobot
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 11, 2013
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      FWIW, Jalopy Journal set of my virus program.. said they were sending me a trojan horse..

      bk



      From: hobot <hobot@...>
      To: "mc-engine@yahoogroups.com" <mc-engine@yahoogroups.com>; hobot <hobot@...>; Michael E. Starkey <mes116@...>
      Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 7:14 PM
      Subject: propane hotrod - THE H.A.M.B.

       
      I did business with Ak Miller Over The Hill Gang for a 366 hp V8 partially
      optimized for LPG with 11 CR and Crowler jet boat cam Al heads. Only
      lost 5% power vs hi test gas dyno runs, till ran out of flow size at 4600
      but as in heavy van lower 4000 is about as much as ever needed or desired.
      Here's bickering and bantering long forum page that pretty much covers
      the whole scope on how to get more pow than gasoline. About all other
      liquid fuels are poison in one way other another.

      http://jalopyjournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=290927&showall=1



    • hobot
      Ugh sorry, but it didn t seem to alert my digital social disease detector. Texas has a lot of LPG stations but Arkansas would need good storage on board so
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 11, 2013
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        Ugh sorry, but it didn't seem to alert my digital social disease detector.
        Texas has a lot of LPG stations but Arkansas would need good storage
        on board so would of replaced most of van rear frame with 2 or 3
        80 gal, of which 80% is useable.  The biggest advantage is how
        clean engines run for extra long time.   My 20 hp genset starts
        up every time like it was just shut down, no matter how super
        cold the power out storm gets.  I flat wore out a 20 hp diesel
        and what a mess of oil and other maintaince and when really
        cold to need it the dang thing is a frozen lump and no easy safe
        way to heat it up.  I will be on look out for carbon fiber tanks
        and LPG injectors someday to feed the blower, just for fun
        and to be different.   hobot

        On 9/11/2013 9:47 AM, briankk wrote:
         
        FWIW, Jalopy Journal set of my virus program.. said they were sending me a trojan horse..

        bk

      • djtcz2001
        No first hand experience, but there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that propane can have cold starting issues, even when cold refers to Texas. I am
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 12, 2013
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           No first hand experience, but there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that propane can have "cold" starting issues, even when "cold" refers to Texas.

          "I am located north of Dallas. From my experience with our school buses, it is harder to start propane engines in cold weather. We have about 60 propane-powered school buses. In cold weather, say below 40 degrees, it takes a LOT of cranking to get them going in the morning. The newest buses have a wait- to- start feature on them. It takes about 12 seconds for the light to go off, then they do start with somewhat less cranking. I am not sure what exactly happens during that wait to start period of time.
          If the batteries are even a little low on charge, you can forget about starting these things on a cold moring without a jump."

          http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-366121.html


          .................

          This suggests there are 2 basic types of propane systems, using either liquid or gas, and the liquid one is what is needed for temps below 20 F or so, especially if using a tank without a big surface area for phase change from liquid to vapor. 

          Post 5 asnd others here -

          http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=115093





        • hobot
          Ok there appears to be issues with all fuels and must wait for real good fuel cells to put all the mess and starting troubles behind us. LPG vapor kit all have
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 12, 2013
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            Ok there appears to be issues with all fuels and must wait for real good
            fuel cells to put all the mess and starting troubles behind us. LPG vapor
            kit all have an evaporator-heater with hot engine coolant passing through
            or the expansion to gas can keep it in liguid state.  The liquid :LPG injector
            systems solve that and more though,. hobot.

            On 9/12/2013 10:03 AM, djtcz@... wrote:
             

             No first hand experience, but there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that propane can have "cold" starting issues, even when "cold" refers to Texas.

            "I am located north of Dallas. From my experience with our school buses, it is harder to start propane engines in cold weather. We have about 60 propane-powered school buses. In cold weather, say below 40 degrees, it takes a LOT of cranking to get them going in the morning. The newest buses have a wait- to- start feature on them. It takes about 12 seconds for the light to go off, then they do start with somewhat less cranking. I am not sure what exactly happens during that wait to start period of time.
            If the batteries are even a little low on charge, you can forget about starting these things on a cold moring without a jump."

            http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-366121.html


            .................

            This suggests there are 2 basic types of propane systems, using either liquid or gas, and the liquid one is what is needed for temps below 20 F or so, especially if using a tank without a big surface area for phase change from liquid to vapor. 

            Post 5 asnd others here -

            http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=115093






          • Me
            In Ontario, it s not uncommon to have cold start issues on propane vehicles in the winter if you can t plug the vehicle in on below zero nights. I don t see
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 13, 2013
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              In Ontario, it's not uncommon to have cold start issues on propane vehicles in the winter if you can't plug the vehicle in on below zero nights.

              I don't see many propane vehicles at all in Northern Ontario.


              On Thu, Sep 12, 2013 at 11:03 AM, <djtcz@...> wrote:


               No first hand experience, but there is plenty of anecdotal evidence that propane can have "cold" starting issues, even when "cold" refers to Texas.

              "I am located north of Dallas. From my experience with our school buses, it is harder to start propane engines in cold weather. We have about 60 propane-powered school buses. In cold weather, say below 40 degrees, it takes a LOT of cranking to get them going in the morning. The newest buses have a wait- to- start feature on them. It takes about 12 seconds for the light to go off, then they do start with somewhat less cranking. I am not sure what exactly happens during that wait to start period of time.
              If the batteries are even a little low on charge, you can forget about starting these things on a cold moring without a jump."

              http://www.lawnsite.com/archive/index.php/t-366121.html


              .................

              This suggests there are 2 basic types of propane systems, using either liquid or gas, and the liquid one is what is needed for temps below 20 F or so, especially if using a tank without a big surface area for phase change from liquid to vapor. 

              Post 5 asnd others here -

              http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t=115093








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