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Re: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene

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  • Sanford Sears
    Thank you all for you help and suggestions.  I will start to do all as to the best of my ability but many things are quite beyond my ability.  Does anyone
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 1, 2011
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      Thank you all for you help and suggestions.  I will start to do all as to the best of my ability but many things are quite beyond my ability.  Does anyone have suggestions as to a good restoration shop here on the east coast?
       
      Sanford Sears

      From: tim simonsma <tsimonsma@...>
      To: "maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com" <maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 1:39 PM 
      Subject: Re: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene

       
      Sanford,
      As an individual that has restored Maxwells, I would like to offer these suggestions.  The worst thing you can do is nothing or prolong the time of action waiting for an insurance company.  You should be able to go out to the car and remove the (2) ¼” pipe plugs on the lower portion of the crank case and transmission housing.  This will allow the water to drain from the transmission.  Next you should open up or remove the 2 outside compression petcocks.  This will allow the water that is trapped in the combustion area to be drained.  Cranking the engine over will help blow the water and oil out.  To remove the water out of the crankshaft/piston area you may have to remove the magneto and timing cover and reach in the crankshaft reservoir and remove any excess water with an absorbing rag.  You might want to look around the area where the car has been stored and determine whether you are removing water or water and sand.  If the running boards appear to be fairly clear of standing sediment you are probably good just removing water.  In a worst case senario with a lot of sand in the engine you may have to drop the drive line, remove the rear housing on the engine, pull out the clutch packs, and flush with diesel fuel and re-assemble.  This is probably not the case as 1 hour simply sitting under water would not bring much silt into the engine.  After the water has been removed make sure that you re-install the plugs, remove the transmission cover, and pour a quart of 30-weight motor oil over the clutch pack.  If you have removed the oil from the engine crankshaft area you need to pour some back into that area to a depth of about 1/2”.  Reinstall or close your compression plugs, then drain the bowl on the carburetor to make sure all the water is out.  Start the engine and let it warm up and make sure all the drippers are dripping at a faster than normal rate until the oil starts dripping out the rear of the engine.
                  The rear end will require a check to see how much water has entered the rear end housing.  As there is no drain plug on the 1910 AA Maxwell you will have to work from the 1/8” pipe plug on the top of the housing.  You should be able to take 1/8” copper tube and slide it from the top down to the bottom of the rear end housing where the water would be and simply suck out any remaining water until you get oil to come out your suction tube.  Replenish your oil level and you should be good to go.  If you find that you are having trouble accessing this area through your small pipe plug you can always remove the driveline and pull the pinion gear out and access through the front. 
                  The front wheel bearings should be removed and repacked to make sure that there is no water trapped in there and pitting the bearings and races. 
                  These little cars are very resilient and have been flooded many times over the last 100 years.  You will find with quick action that this is a simple task and can be done in an afternoon. 
      Thank you for taking care of a national treasure, any specific questions you can call me @ 916-995-1804.  Tim Simonsma

      From: Sanford Sears <fathersears@...>
      To: "maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com" <maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 7:50 AM
      Subject: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene

       
      Asking all about suggestions:
       
      My restored 1910 AA was flooded up to the floor boards during Irene.  I have contacted the insurance company and am waiting for a return call.  Right now water is dripping out of the crank shaft.  The water was river and creek water from the surge of the storm.  Water stayed high for about an hour.  I had the car another 8 inches off the car on jacks, so you can imagine the result if I had not raised it.  No electronics were flooded.  I would like suggestions as to what to do and what I need to say to the insurer as to repair etc.  I am not a mechanico and I was not the one who restored the car.
       
      Thanks for your advice.
      Sanford+
       
      The Rev. Father Sanford Sears
      Rector St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, New Bern, NC
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    • S ATHERTON
      Thank you From: Frank Cerutti To: maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, 30 July 2012, 10:13 Subject: Re:
      Message 33 of 33 , Jul 30, 2012
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        Thank you

        From: Frank Cerutti <cerutfa@...>
        To: maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, 30 July 2012, 10:13
        Subject: Re: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene
         
        Hello s atherton I am planning to use a Penrite product called "Semi Fluid Grease". It comes packaged in 450g cartridge suitable for use in a caulking gun or a cartridge grease gun. The viscosity is NLGI 00 which you can search for on line. In the 1909 LD, one cartridge fills the differential case to about 2/3 of the distance up to the axle centre line, which I think will be adequate. I was fortunate enough to have been able to pump the sun gear case full of grease via a temporary grease nipple during assembly. The original Hyatt style roller bearings are still serviceable and I packed them with grease during assembly. I lubricate these with motor oil via the oilers when I take the car out. I too would appreciate any comments from members. Frank 1909 LD9024 Townsville Australia
        Home phone - 07 4775 7885 || Home fax -
         07 4422 0034 || Home e-mail - cerutfa@...
        Work phone - 07 4727 6598 || Work fax - 07 4727 6680 || Work e-mail - frank.cerutti@...
        Mobile phone - 0417 705 309 || Mail: 22 Sabadine Street, Aitkenvale 4814, Queensland, Australia
        On 29/07/2012 10:38 PM, S ATHERTON wrote:
         
        hello can anyone tell me what oil goes in rare axle 1909 model  A   run a about , and the amount  , thank you s atherton uk

        From: Sanford Sears mailto:fathersears@...
        To: maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, 28 July 2012, 20:09
        Subject: Re: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene
         
        Tim,
        Thank you to you and your father as to your help as to the flooded Maxwell AA.  I had my re restorer clean out everything as you suggested, rebuild the Magneto, but now the car is still giving us problems.  Even with a 12 volt system we cannot get enough spark.  The coil had been soaked so the mechanic had a new coil built by R V Anderson and did not work, hence his going to 12 volt.  He gets the car running well on 2 Model T coils and has suggested building an authentic coil box to mount those coils.  I don't know and of course as just one who care takes and doesn't have the knowledge to tear a car apart I am out of the box here.  I trust the guy, he has done some very good restorations on early Packards.  Do you have any suggestions?  Can I have this gentleman contact you if you do. 
         
        Again thank you.
         
        Sanford Sears, 1910 Maxwell Model AA
        New Bern, NC --- On Wed, 8/31/11, tim simonsma mailto:tsimonsma@... wrote:

        From: tim simonsma mailto:tsimonsma@...
        Subject: Re: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene
        To: mailto:maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com mailto:maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, August 31, 2011, 1:39 PM

         
        Sanford,
        As an individual that has restored Maxwells, I would like to offer these suggestions.  The worst thing you can do is nothing or prolong the time of action waiting for an insurance company.  You should be able to go out to the car and remove the (2) ¼” pipe plugs on the lower portion of the crank case and transmission housing.  This will allow the water to drain from the transmission.  Next you should open up or remove the 2 outside compression petcocks.  This will allow the water that is trapped in the combustion area to be drained.  Cranking the engine over will help blow the water and oil out.  To remove the water out of the crankshaft/piston area you may have to remove the magneto and timing cover and reach in the crankshaft reservoir and remove any excess water with an absorbing rag.  You might want to look around the area where the car has been stored and determine whether you are removing water or water and sand.  If the running boards appear to be fairly clear of standing sediment you are probably good just removing water.  In a worst case senario with a lot of sand in the engine you may have to drop the drive line, remove the rear housing on the engine, pull out the clutch packs, and flush with diesel fuel and re-assemble.  This is probably not the case as 1 hour simply sitting under water would not bring much silt into the engine.  After the water has been removed make sure that you re-install the plugs, remove the transmission cover, and pour a quart of 30-weight motor oil over the clutch pack.  If you have removed the oil from the engine crankshaft area you need to pour some back into that area to a depth of about 1/2”.  Reinstall or close your compression plugs, then drain the bowl on the carburetor to make sure all the water is out.  Start the engine and let it warm up and make sure all the drippers are dripping at a faster than normal rate until the oil starts dripping out the rear of the engine.
                    The rear end will require a check to see how much water has entered the rear end housing.  As there is no drain plug on the 1910 AA Maxwell you will have to work from the 1/8” pipe plug on the top of the housing.  You should be able to take 1/8” copper tube and slide it from the top down to the bottom of the rear end housing where the water would be and simply suck out any remaining water until you get oil to come out your suction tube.  Replenish your oil level and you should be good to go.  If you find that you are having trouble accessing this area through your small pipe plug you can always remove the driveline and pull the pinion gear out and access through the front. 
                    The front wheel bearings should be removed and repacked to make sure that there is no water trapped in there and pitting the bearings and races. 
                    These little cars are very resilient and have been flooded many times over the last 100 years.  You will find with quick action that this is a simple task and can be done in an afternoon. 
        Thank you for taking care of a national treasure, any specific questions you can call me @ 916-995-1804.  Tim Simonsma
        From: Sanford Sears mailto:fathersears@...
        To: mailto:maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com mailto:maxwellbriscoeowners@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2011 7:50 AM
        Subject: [maxwellbriscoeowners] Maxwell vrs. Hurricane Irene
         
        Asking all about suggestions:
         
        My restored 1910 AA was flooded up to the floor boards during Irene.  I have contacted the insurance company and am waiting for a return call.  Right now water is dripping out of the crank shaft.  The water was river and creek water from the surge of the storm.  Water stayed high for about an hour.  I had the car another 8 inches off the car on jacks, so you can imagine the result if I had not raised it.  No electronics were flooded.  I would like suggestions as to what to do and what I need to say to the insurer as to repair etc.  I am not a mechanico and I was not the one who restored the car.
         
        Thanks for your advice.
        Sanford+
         
        The Rev. Father Sanford Sears
        Rector St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, New Bern, NC
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