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Re: [MATH for FUN] [Daily Brain Teaser] Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November

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  • MorphemeAddict
    Lavesh must be very quick! stevo ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 19, 2012
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      Lavesh must be very quick!

      stevo

      On Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 2:07 AM, lavesh rawat <love19_foryou@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November
      >
      > Lavesh, Bolt, and Lewis race each other in a 100 meters race. All of them
      > run at a constant speed throughout the race.
      >
      > Lavesh beats Bolt by 20 meters.
      > Bolt beats Lewis by 20 meters.
      >
      > How many meters does Lavesh beat Lewis by ?
      >
      > Update Your Answers at : Click Here
      >
      > Solution
      > Will be updated after 1 day
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tofique Fatehi
      In any race, I would like to be last. Then no one can overtake me !!!!! Tofique Fatehi ________________________________ From: MorphemeAddict
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 19, 2012
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        In any race, I would like to be last.
        Then no one can overtake me !!!!!
        Tofique Fatehi


        ________________________________
        From: MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...>
        To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, November 20, 2012 12:58 AM
        Subject: Re: [MATH for FUN] [Daily Brain Teaser] Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November

         
        Lavesh must be very quick!stevoOn Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 2:07 AM, lavesh rawat <mailto:love19_foryou%40yahoo.com>wrote:> **>>> Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November>> Lavesh, Bolt, and Lewis race each other in a 100 meters race. All of them> run at a constant speed throughout the race.>> Lavesh beats Bolt by 20 meters.> Bolt beats Lewis by 20 meters.>> How many meters does Lavesh beat Lewis by ?>> Update Your Answers at : Click Here>> Solution> Will be updated after 1 day>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]>> >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Arumai Raj
        In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two each of six.
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 19, 2012
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          In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be divided into four each of three.

          In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will follow the other.

          Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper cell have no follower.

          What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the follower as what is happened in the movie.


          Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ  

















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ashim kar
          36m ... From: MorphemeAddict Subject: Re: [MATH for FUN] [Daily Brain Teaser] Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November To:
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 19, 2012
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            36m

            --- On Mon, 19/11/12, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:


            From: MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...>
            Subject: Re: [MATH for FUN] [Daily Brain Teaser] Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November
            To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, 19 November, 2012, 7:28 PM



             



            Lavesh must be very quick!

            stevo

            On Mon, Nov 19, 2012 at 2:07 AM, lavesh rawat <love19_foryou@...>wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Maths Classic Race Puzzle - 19 November
            >
            > Lavesh, Bolt, and Lewis race each other in a 100 meters race. All of them
            > run at a constant speed throughout the race.
            >
            > Lavesh beats Bolt by 20 meters.
            > Bolt beats Lewis by 20 meters.
            >
            > How many meters does Lavesh beat Lewis by ?
            >
            > Update Your Answers at : Click Here
            >
            > Solution
            > Will be updated after 1 day
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • video_ranger
            There isn t enough information to calculate a probability - but what you re describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of a small fixed
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 21, 2012
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              There isn't enough information to calculate a probability - but what you're describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of a small fixed number of others (for example three others) and when it was necessary to make a lopsided split of agents (e.g. 2 and 1) the majority would go with the new contact and the minority stay with the old (who would be less likely to uncover someone new).

              Mark


              --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be divided into four each of three.
              >
              > In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will follow the other.
              >
              > Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper cell have no follower.
              >
              > What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the follower as what is happened in the movie.
              >
              >
              > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ  
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Arumai Raj
              There is enough information to calculate probability.  Also your idea  that majority will follow the new one is correct. But also there must be a confusion
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 22, 2012
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                There is enough information to calculate probability.  Also your idea  that majority will follow the new one is correct. But also there must be a confusion at that stage because all groups may not think the same way.
                 

                --- On Wed, 21/11/12, video_ranger <markjones76@...> wrote:


                From: video_ranger <markjones76@...>
                Subject: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem
                To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, 21 November, 2012, 9:54 PM



                 



                There isn't enough information to calculate a probability - but what you're describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of a small fixed number of others (for example three others) and when it was necessary to make a lopsided split of agents (e.g. 2 and 1) the majority would go with the new contact and the minority stay with the old (who would be less likely to uncover someone new).

                Mark

                --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be divided into four each of three.
                >
                > In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will follow the other.
                >
                > Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper cell have no follower.
                >
                > What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the follower as what is happened in the movie.
                >
                >
                > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ  
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • MorphemeAddict
                ... How can one calculate the probability, then? stevo ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 22, 2012
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                  On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 6:30 AM, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:

                  > **
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > There is enough information to calculate probability.
                  >
                  How can one calculate the probability, then?

                  stevo

                  > Also your idea that majority will follow the new one is correct. But also
                  > there must be a confusion at that stage because all groups may not think
                  > the same way.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- On Wed, 21/11/12, video_ranger <markjones76@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: video_ranger <markjones76@...>
                  > Subject: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem
                  > To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Wednesday, 21 November, 2012, 9:54 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > There isn't enough information to calculate a probability - but what
                  > you're describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of
                  > a small fixed number of others (for example three others) and when it was
                  > necessary to make a lopsided split of agents (e.g. 2 and 1) the majority
                  > would go with the new contact and the minority stay with the old (who would
                  > be less likely to uncover someone new).
                  >
                  > Mark
                  >
                  > --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper
                  > cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two
                  > each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be
                  > divided into four each of three.
                  > >
                  > > In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of
                  > three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will
                  > follow the other.
                  > >
                  > > Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by
                  > two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper
                  > cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper
                  > cell have no follower.
                  > >
                  > > What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the
                  > follower as what is happened in the movie.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Arumai Raj
                  Three officers are following one terrorist. The terrorist meet new one and they travel in different directions. Now the officers have two options. Option 1: 
                  Message 8 of 10 , Nov 24, 2012
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                    Three officers are following one terrorist. The terrorist meet new one and they travel in different directions.

                    Now the officers have two options.

                    Option 1:  Two follow the old one. one to follow the new one.

                    Option 2: Two follow the new one. one to follow the old one.

                    If the one following by two officers meet another , the program will be successful that each officer will be following one terrorist.

                    If the one following by one officer meet another, then there will be a confusion that one terrorist will have no follower and there will be one terrorist following by two officers.

                    So out of the above two options, one will be successful  that the probability of success is 1/2.

                    There are four groups like that at that time. So the total probability will be

                    1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/16 = 6.25 %



                    Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ    

                    --- On Thu, 22/11/12, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:

                    From: MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...>
                    Subject: Re: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem
                    To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, 22 November, 2012, 9:46 PM
















                     









                    On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 6:30 AM, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:



                    > **

                    >

                    >

                    >

                    >

                    > There is enough information to calculate probability.

                    >

                    How can one calculate the probability, then?



                    stevo



                    > Also your idea that majority will follow the new one is correct. But also

                    > there must be a confusion at that stage because all groups may not think

                    > the same way.

                    >

                    >

                    > --- On Wed, 21/11/12, video_ranger <markjones76@...> wrote:

                    >

                    > From: video_ranger <markjones76@...>

                    > Subject: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem

                    > To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com

                    > Date: Wednesday, 21 November, 2012, 9:54 PM

                    >

                    >

                    >

                    >

                    > There isn't enough information to calculate a probability - but what

                    > you're describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of

                    > a small fixed number of others (for example three others) and when it was

                    > necessary to make a lopsided split of agents (e.g. 2 and 1) the majority

                    > would go with the new contact and the minority stay with the old (who would

                    > be less likely to uncover someone new).

                    >

                    > Mark

                    >

                    > --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:

                    > >

                    > >

                    > > In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper

                    > cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two

                    > each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be

                    > divided into four each of three.

                    > >

                    > > In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of

                    > three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will

                    > follow the other.

                    > >

                    > > Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by

                    > two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper

                    > cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper

                    > cell have no follower.

                    > >

                    > > What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the

                    > follower as what is happened in the movie.

                    > >

                    > >

                    > > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > >

                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    > >

                    >

                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    >

                    >

                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



























                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • video_ranger
                    OK I see. In general it s impossible to calculate a probability without a probabilistic hypothesis. It s best to be explicit about it by using the word
                    Message 9 of 10 , Nov 26, 2012
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                      OK I see.

                      In general it's impossible to calculate a probability without a probabilistic hypothesis. It's best to be explicit about it by using the word "random" or by using devices conventionally assumed to be random (coin flips, etc.).

                      Mark

                      --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Three officers are following one terrorist. The terrorist meet new one and they travel in different directions.
                      >
                      > Now the officers have two options.
                      >
                      > Option 1:  Two follow the old one. one to follow the new one.
                      >
                      > Option 2: Two follow the new one. one to follow the old one.
                      >
                      > If the one following by two officers meet another , the program will be successful that each officer will be following one terrorist.
                      >
                      > If the one following by one officer meet another, then there will be a confusion that one terrorist will have no follower and there will be one terrorist following by two officers.
                      >
                      > So out of the above two options, one will be successful  that the probability of success is 1/2.
                      >
                      > There are four groups like that at that time. So the total probability will be
                      >
                      > 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 x 1/2 = 1/16 = 6.25 %
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ    
                      >
                      > --- On Thu, 22/11/12, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > From: MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...>
                      > Subject: Re: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem
                      > To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Thursday, 22 November, 2012, 9:46 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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                      >  
                      >
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                      >
                      > On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 6:30 AM, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > > **
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > There is enough information to calculate probability.
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > How can one calculate the probability, then?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > stevo
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > > Also your idea that majority will follow the new one is correct. But also
                      >
                      > > there must be a confusion at that stage because all groups may not think
                      >
                      > > the same way.
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > --- On Wed, 21/11/12, video_ranger <markjones76@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > From: video_ranger <markjones76@...>
                      >
                      > > Subject: [MATH for FUN] Re: Thuppaakki - logic problem
                      >
                      > > To: mathforfun@yahoogroups.com
                      >
                      > > Date: Wednesday, 21 November, 2012, 9:54 PM
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > There isn't enough information to calculate a probability - but what
                      >
                      > > you're describing is not necessarily unlikely if each cell has knowledge of
                      >
                      > > a small fixed number of others (for example three others) and when it was
                      >
                      > > necessary to make a lopsided split of agents (e.g. 2 and 1) the majority
                      >
                      > > would go with the new contact and the minority stay with the old (who would
                      >
                      > > be less likely to uncover someone new).
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > Mark
                      >
                      > >
                      >
                      > > --- In mathforfun@yahoogroups.com, Arumai Raj <arumairajp@> wrote:
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > > In thuppaakki movie, Vijay with 11 other officers following one sleeper
                      >
                      > > cell who will meet another by that time the group will divide in to two
                      >
                      > > each of six. After each of them meet another sleeper cell the group will be
                      >
                      > > divided into four each of three.
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > > In the next step when the sleeper cell meet another one, each group of
                      >
                      > > three should be divided into two of which two will follow one and one will
                      >
                      > > follow the other.
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > > Here the problem comes in the last step, if the sleeper cell followed by
                      >
                      > > two officers meet another, there will be no problem. But if the sleeper
                      >
                      > > cell followed by a single officer meet the other, there will be one sleeper
                      >
                      > > cell have no follower.
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > > What is the chance or probability that all sleeper cells will have the
                      >
                      > > follower as what is happened in the movie.
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > > Regards P. ARUMAIRAJ
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > >
                      >
                      > > >
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                      > > >
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